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September 15, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
The in Washington has announced the resignation of its chief curator, who left as an apparent result of the gallery's decision to cancel a show of work by the late photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. The resignation of Jane Livingston was announced by the gallery late Wednesday. She is currently on a six-month leave of absence working, under a Guggenheim fellowship, on a book titled "The New York School: Photography, 1936-1963."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
The in Washington has announced the resignation of its chief curator, who left as an apparent result of the gallery's decision to cancel a show of work by the late photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. The resignation of Jane Livingston was announced by the gallery late Wednesday. She is currently on a six-month leave of absence working, under a Guggenheim fellowship, on a book titled "The New York School: Photography, 1936-1963."
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BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Margarita Nieto, Nieto is an art and literary critic and a frequent contributor to Artweek on Latino art. An associate professor at Cal State Northridge, she recently completed an interview with the Mexican painter, Rufino Tamayo
Since the late '60s, Latino art in the United States has gone from the street and public art muralist movements into the mainstream of contemporary American art. As a response to the American political scene of that period and of the decade that followed, the Latino murals of Chicago, San Antonio, San Diego and Los Angeles were didactic and strongly ideological, often depicting the realities of recent political struggles and the need for social justice.
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Margarita Nieto, Nieto is an art and literary critic and a frequent contributor to Artweek on Latino art. An associate professor at Cal State Northridge, she recently completed an interview with the Mexican painter, Rufino Tamayo
Since the late '60s, Latino art in the United States has gone from the street and public art muralist movements into the mainstream of contemporary American art. As a response to the American political scene of that period and of the decade that followed, the Latino murals of Chicago, San Antonio, San Diego and Los Angeles were didactic and strongly ideological, often depicting the realities of recent political struggles and the need for social justice.
BOOKS
June 30, 1996 | Noel Riley Fitch
ZELDA An Illustrated Life: The Private World of Zelda Fitzgerald Edited by Eleanor Lanahan; essays by Peter Kurth and Jane Livingston (Harry N. Abrams: $24.95; 128 pages). The Jazz Age was the age of the gifted amateur. One always allowed time to "Save me the waltz," and Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald is very much of her era. This centenary year of F.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2011
MUSIC Bleeding Knees Club The youthful musical duo from Australia's Gold Coast burst upon the music scene early this year with a catchy treasure trove of garage-pop and surf-punk flavored demos. With the summer release of their first official single, "Have Fun" from the British Noir label, they've solidified their reputation as an irreverent rock 'n' roll force, making their first Southland appearance a must for indie fans. Satellite, 1717 Silverlake Blvd., Silver Lake.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
It was swinging '64. Vietnam was boiling over again, there were riots in Harlem, Stanley Kubrick made "Dr. Strangelove" and Bob Dylan was singing "It Ain't Me, Babe." Maurice Tuchman--a 27-year-old research fellow at New York's Guggenheim Museum--was considering an offer to become the first full-time curator of modern art at the new Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1995 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer.
The first issue of Vernacular, a Los Angeles-based art mag azine with international aspirations, has hit the news stands. Co-founders and editors Lita Barrie and Brett Horner describe their creation as a publication about visual culture that blurs boundaries between disciplines and targets a broad audience. "We're committed to not following old models of magazines," Barrie says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, Times Staff Writer
The Indian holy man stares straight into the camera, his open mouth revealing the wire that he has pushed through his cheeks as self-inflicted penance. A lama caretaker in China poses in a library of ill-fated printing blocks used to publish the Tibetan Buddhist scripture. Three balloons are frozen in various stages of explosion as the bullet that tore through them seems to hang suspended in mid-air.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
In his early artistic life, Carlos Almaraz branded the walls of the East Los Angeles barrio with angry political iconography, campaigning for California grape workers' rights ("Boycott Gallo Wine") and proclaiming the dignity of Chicanos ("We're Not Slaves of Immigration"). The work was subsidized by the Department of Recreation and Parks, which initially offered Chicano muralists $45.50 per artist, 12 gallons of paint, two ladders and a plank. "Hey, you're going to kill yourselves!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Lee Miller must have been some piece of work. Just a kid from Poughkeepsie, she became a queen of Paris' Lost Generation. Hemingway could have invented her. Beautiful, both draped and bare, she ravished the lenses of photographers from Steichen to Horst.
BOOKS
December 8, 1996 | Judith Freeman and Anthony Hernandez, Judith Freeman's most recent novel is "A Desert of Pure Feeling" (Pantheon Books). Anthony Hernandez's book of photographs, "Landscapes for the Homeless," was published last year by the Sprengel Museum in Hanover, Germany
A book of photographs can make a fine gift, especially if it's one that can be looked at again and again for the way in which it illuminates aspects of the human condition. We discovered three such books in this year's offerings: Come Sunday, The Tunnel and Hospice. Here's why we liked them: Judith Freeman: Come Sunday is unlike any book I've over seen. A few years ago, a pastor invited Thomas Roma to photograph inside an African American church in Brooklyn.
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