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Jane Mendelsohn

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NEWS
September 1, 2000 | CARA MIA DIMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"My name is Beckett, and this is not a dream. This is not a delusion. This is not based on a true story. This is true. Doesn't anyone believe me?" This desperate introduction opens "Innocence," Jane Mendelsohn's follow-up to the much-acclaimed "I Was Amelia Earhart." It is not an easy time for Beckett Warner, the flawed narrator of "Innocence." She is on the verge of puberty.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The People Who Watched Her Pass By Scott Bradfield Two Dollar Radio: 146 pp., $14.50 Salome Jensen is 3 years old and brilliant. She is also brave and unforgettable. One day, the guy who fixes the hot water heater takes her away from her family to live with him in a bungalow in Van Nuys. From the moment they pull away in his Volkswagen van, Salome calls him Daddy. "I care for you very much in my own special way, and not in any of those sick, perverted ways you hear about in tabloid television programs and newspapers.
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NEWS
July 18, 1996 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can tell you're in someone else's fantasy just by reading the title, "I Was Amelia Earhart." You might even wonder if the author, Jane Mendelsohn, still answers to her real name. Such odd concerns have only helped attract more readers to her brief, poetic novel. Within weeks of the book's April publication (Alfred Knopf), there were paperback and movie deals, a rushed second printing and high visibility on the bestseller lists. "I don't feel like I was ever Amelia Earhart.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | CARA MIA DIMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"My name is Beckett, and this is not a dream. This is not a delusion. This is not based on a true story. This is true. Doesn't anyone believe me?" This desperate introduction opens "Innocence," Jane Mendelsohn's follow-up to the much-acclaimed "I Was Amelia Earhart." It is not an easy time for Beckett Warner, the flawed narrator of "Innocence." She is on the verge of puberty.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The People Who Watched Her Pass By Scott Bradfield Two Dollar Radio: 146 pp., $14.50 Salome Jensen is 3 years old and brilliant. She is also brave and unforgettable. One day, the guy who fixes the hot water heater takes her away from her family to live with him in a bungalow in Van Nuys. From the moment they pull away in his Volkswagen van, Salome calls him Daddy. "I care for you very much in my own special way, and not in any of those sick, perverted ways you hear about in tabloid television programs and newspapers.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | SUSAN HEEGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Good news, Amelia Earhart fans. This summer your elusive hero flies again in two recently published novels that can be knocked off in a couple of beach days. And I do recommend the beach. Both are largely set on desert islands, the kind where palm trees sway and the only beverage comes in coconuts. Both are first novels that suggest that Amelia--who vanished in 1937 on a trans-world flight--didn't go down in a blast of fire but landed safely on some atoll with her navigator, Fred.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can tell you're in someone else's fantasy just by reading the title, "I Was Amelia Earhart." You might even wonder if the author, Jane Mendelsohn, still answers to her real name. Such odd concerns have only helped attract more readers to her brief, poetic novel. Within weeks of the book's April publication (Alfred Knopf), there were paperback and movie deals, a rushed second printing and high visibility on the bestseller lists. "I don't feel like I was ever Amelia Earhart.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | SUSAN HEEGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Good news, Amelia Earhart fans. This summer your elusive hero flies again in two recently published novels that can be knocked off in a couple of beach days. And I do recommend the beach. Both are largely set on desert islands, the kind where palm trees sway and the only beverage comes in coconuts. Both are first novels that suggest that Amelia--who vanished in 1937 on a trans-world flight--didn't go down in a blast of fire but landed safely on some atoll with her navigator, Fred.
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