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Jane Nathanson

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NEWS
March 10, 1986 | TIA GINDICK, Times Staff Writer
Jane Nathanson has sized up the situation. Do-gooding was fine for her mother's generation, those energetic women of usually affluent households who about 40 years ago were spotting needs--unwed mothers, deprived children, bright youngsters who need scholarships--and starting organizations to handle these problems. But not today. Today, if you've got the energy and you want to make an impact, it's do-gooding plus politics plus activism.
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NEWS
August 9, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
Elizabeth Glaser was more than a little anxious when she priced tickets to her first "A Time for Heroes" benefit for the Pediatric AIDS Foundation at $2,500 per family, or $1,000 per person. Many of the city's moneyed elite who drive Jaguars, send their children to private schools and vacation in Aspen found the hefty price tag too steep. "A lot of people said it was just too expensive for them," says Glaser, co-founder of the foundation, who hiked ticket prices in hopes of raising $1 million.
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NEWS
August 9, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
Elizabeth Glaser was more than a little anxious when she priced tickets to her first "A Time for Heroes" benefit for the Pediatric AIDS Foundation at $2,500 per family, or $1,000 per person. Many of the city's moneyed elite who drive Jaguars, send their children to private schools and vacation in Aspen found the hefty price tag too steep. "A lot of people said it was just too expensive for them," says Glaser, co-founder of the foundation, who hiked ticket prices in hopes of raising $1 million.
NEWS
March 10, 1986 | TIA GINDICK, Times Staff Writer
Jane Nathanson has sized up the situation. Do-gooding was fine for her mother's generation, those energetic women of usually affluent households who about 40 years ago were spotting needs--unwed mothers, deprived children, bright youngsters who need scholarships--and starting organizations to handle these problems. But not today. Today, if you've got the energy and you want to make an impact, it's do-gooding plus politics plus activism.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mortons restaurant in West Hollywood was the site Tuesday evening for the first of two pre-events celebrating the fifth International Contemporary Art Fair (better known as ART/LA90). The year-old Los Angeles office of the National Resources Defense Council, a national environmental organization, was the beneficiary of the $150-a-person dinner, which was served up to 270 people under a tent in Mortons' parking lot.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | BEA MAXWELL
John Wayne Cancer Institute received $18,000 raised at the July 16 "Casino Night" benefit hosted by Chapter II, a new institute support group. The event was held at the Olympic Collection in West Los Angeles. Proceeds will provide psychosocial programs for cancer patients. * Best Buddies, a nonprofit organization founded by Anthony Shriver, raised $55,000 at its June 29 benefit at the home of Marc and Jane Nathanson.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
A new name is going up at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's soon-to-open Broad Contemporary Art Museum. LACMA trustee Jane Nathanson and her husband, communication and investment mogul Marc Nathanson, will have a ground-floor gallery in the building named for them in recognition of a $10-million gift to the museum to be announced today. The donation is earmarked for contemporary art programs and acquisitions. "It's going to be one of the best spaces in the world to show contemporary art.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: Book party on Monday night at Neiman Marcus for first-time novelist and current bicoastalist (L.A./Washington, D.C.) Marylouise Oates. A former social columnist and reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Oates veers far from the social whirl in "Making Peace" (Warner Books) to write about the '60s anti-war movement. (In a former life, Oates was a press aide to Sen. Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential campaign and worked for the Vietnam Moratorium.) Author tranquillity rating: Low.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
No matter that Nancy Reagan just said no. Tout Hollywood just said yes. Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown pulled together an eclectic, star-filled A-list party Thursday night at Culver Studios to drum up support for Phoenix House, the substance-abuse program headed by Dr. Mitchell Rosenthal. Phoenix House used to have a strong cheerleader in the former First Lady until she yanked her support.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Thanks to a donor who loves the work of Edward Ruscha, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art has compiled a nearly complete set of the quintessential L.A. artist's prints. LACMA trustee Jane Nathanson and her husband, Marc, provided funds for the museum to purchase 156 works from Ruscha -- examples of all the prints in his personal collection not already owned by the museum.
REAL ESTATE
February 22, 2004 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
A step inside this Santa Monica Canyon house is like a leap back into the golden age of Hollywood and a visit with the beautiful actress Dolores del Rio and her handsome husband, Cedric Gibbons, multiple Oscar-winning art director for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Gibbons, who has been credited with designing the Oscar statuette, co-designed this house with Douglas Honnold, who also worked as an art director at MGM.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
"This doesn't feel like a stuffy opera party," declared Nancy Vreeland, as her eyes scanned the room of tuxedoed men and elegantly dressed women. "We don't have a stuffy opera," replied her friend. Despite the formality of clothes and major jewels, there was little stuffiness at the home of Jane and Marc Nathanson on Saturday night when 130 Los Angeles Music Center Opera supporters met for dinner.
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