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Jane Pratt

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2011 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Before its launch a few weeks ago, frenzied reports of the coming of xoJane.com had the same gossipy, mythic quality that accompanied James Franco's academic career or, say, the birth of Shiloh Jolie-Pitt: confusion, rumor and a little cattiness. It isn't surprising that the website's launch was greeted with such mixed feelings, because it's the new online women's magazine from Jane Pratt aimed at the audience that she helped raise, first as founder of the teen magazine Sassy in 1988 and then of Jane magazine, aimed at the 18-34 market, in 1997.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2011 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Before its launch a few weeks ago, frenzied reports of the coming of xoJane.com had the same gossipy, mythic quality that accompanied James Franco's academic career or, say, the birth of Shiloh Jolie-Pitt: confusion, rumor and a little cattiness. It isn't surprising that the website's launch was greeted with such mixed feelings, because it's the new online women's magazine from Jane Pratt aimed at the audience that she helped raise, first as founder of the teen magazine Sassy in 1988 and then of Jane magazine, aimed at the 18-34 market, in 1997.
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NEWS
September 18, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forgive Jane Pratt for jiggling in her chair. Forgive the girlish squeal that sneaks into her voice. At 29, Pratt is finally queen of the prom. "Now I'm the popular kid I wasn't when I was 16," she coos, relieved at having survived the awkwardness and embarrassments that pain so many teen-agers. "I was miserable then." Now she is editor-in-chief--which sounds entirely too grown-up--of her own magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Read my lip service. Americans preach honesty to their children while passively accepting dishonesty from those who shape and define the universe in which they live. That's because lying has become so institutionalized in the United States that society is now largely desensitized to it. Meet the usual suspects: Television routinely tells lies--white ones, pastel ones and darker ones, falsely advertising, falsely promoting and falsely reporting. Politicians routinely tell lies.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Read my lip service. Americans preach honesty to their children while passively accepting dishonesty from those who shape and define the universe in which they live. That's because lying has become so institutionalized in the United States that society is now largely desensitized to it. Meet the usual suspects: Television routinely tells lies--white ones, pastel ones and darker ones, falsely advertising, falsely promoting and falsely reporting. Politicians routinely tell lies.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Beth Kleid is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Jane Pratt plans to wear her funky black hiking boots on the Monday premiere of her new talk show on cable's Lifetime channel. And if she's in the mood, she might talk about her zits, why her hair won't work or her fierce crush on actor Keanu Reeves. Pratt, the 30-year-old editor of the teen magazine Sassy, wants to be a different kind of talk-show host for a different kind of talk show. "Jane Pratt" is aimed at 18- to 24-year-olds, who are usually neglected by other talk shows.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging the unprofitable economics of its daytime programs, NBC will turn some time periods over to its affiliates as part of a major overhaul of its schedule. The move, the second time in a year that NBC has cut its daytime programming, is the strongest evidence yet of the network's retrenchment efforts in the face of stiffer competition from syndication, cable and other networks. NBC will drop its struggling afternoon soap opera "Santa Barbara" on Jan. 15.
NEWS
October 6, 1989
Jill Lytle, a junior at University High School in Irvine, was a winner in the "Sweet 16 Contest" sponsored by Sassy magazine and the Diamond Information Center. Her essay on why it's "cool" to be 16 and those of 15 other contestants were deemed the most creative and original by a panel of judges, which included young celebrities Lonnie Quinn from the soap opera "All My Children" and Sean Kanan of "Karate Kid III."
BUSINESS
September 5, 1997 | Krissy Harris
Address: http://www.girlsonfilm.com What it is: It's girls on film . . . duh. A chick's-eye view of movies: reviews, commentary and fluff. All the articles and reviews have a link to a bulletin board set up for the topic. Current stints with "Girls on Art," "Girls on Classics" and book reviews will eventually become their own sites, said Dan Pelson, president of Concrete Media, which owns GOF.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | SUSANNE ALTHOFF, COLUMBIA NEWS SERVICE
The woman had been married four months, and already she was sneaking out to see other men. One morning while watching "The Joan Rivers Show," she saw a commercial asking women who were having affairs to call the talk show. She did. On the phone, a producer reminded her that her husband would learn about the affair if she appeared as a guest. Mariann Sabol, senior producer at "Joan Rivers," recalled the woman's answer: "I wanted to tell him somehow."
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forgive Jane Pratt for jiggling in her chair. Forgive the girlish squeal that sneaks into her voice. At 29, Pratt is finally queen of the prom. "Now I'm the popular kid I wasn't when I was 16," she coos, relieved at having survived the awkwardness and embarrassments that pain so many teen-agers. "I was miserable then." Now she is editor-in-chief--which sounds entirely too grown-up--of her own magazine.
NEWS
August 30, 1993 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Girl's Battle With Booze. Save The Earth, Girl. Black Kids Who Are Fed Up. Menstrual Customs: A World Tour. Guns Put Fear In Teens' Hearts. These are not the teen magazine articles your mother used to read. Even compared to just 10 years ago, periodicals for teen-age girls have grown up.
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