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Jane Reno

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NEWS
November 14, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno extended a preliminary inquiry Thursday into allegations that Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt rejected a Native American casino project because of contributions to the Democratic Party by its opponents. The move by Reno gives the Justice Department 90 more days to determine if there is sufficient "specific and credible" evidence of wrongdoing by Babbitt to request the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate the matter.
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NEWS
November 14, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno extended a preliminary inquiry Thursday into allegations that Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt rejected a Native American casino project because of contributions to the Democratic Party by its opponents. The move by Reno gives the Justice Department 90 more days to determine if there is sufficient "specific and credible" evidence of wrongdoing by Babbitt to request the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate the matter.
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MAGAZINE
December 5, 1993 | Jamie Reno (no relation) \f7
At the dedication of a memorial to the Women's Air Force Service Pilots in Sweetwater, Tex., earlier this year, Atty. Gen. Janet Reno said she grew up mesmerized by stories of World War II's WASPs told by her Aunt Winnie. Aunt Winnie is Winifred Wood, 74, a former WASP and retired elementary school teacher who lives in Idyllwild. The youngest of five children, Wood grew up in a Southern family that encouraged the breaking of boundaries.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | CONNIE CASS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Janet Reno wheeled her 79-year-old mother into the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum and together they gazed up at the dinosaur skeletons. Jane Wood Reno--journalist, alligator wrestler and all-around Florida character--was losing a battle with lung cancer and her eyes were weak. But she could still see the big things--like the triceratops that dwarfed even her 6-foot-2-inch daughter. "She loved the dinosaurs," Janet Reno said. A year later, the elder Reno is gone.
MAGAZINE
October 31, 1993 | Nina J. Easton and Ronald J. Ostrow, Nina J. Easton is a staff writer of this magazine. Ronald J. Ostrow is a Times staff writer who has covered the Justice Department for 27 years.
JANET RENO'S VISION OF JUSTICE BEGINS IN A DINGY, OVERCROWDed Miami courtroom swarming with junkies. Anxiety and cynicism hover over the addicts filling the public viewing seats, the former emanating from those sincerely trying to kick their habit, the latter from a savvy few adept at playing the system. The new arrestees, handcuffed and sitting in the jury box, are a sorrier lot, dirt on their elbows, eyes glazed over, smelling of a night in the pen, smelling of failure.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It looked like an ordinary homicide, the bodies of three drowned drug dealers--bearing marks of a beating--floating in the Miami River. But as Janet Reno's state prosecutors examined the case over the next several months, it grew more complex. Evidence accumulated that several policemen had robbed the dopers of $35 million worth of cocaine before the trio was found in the river.
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