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Jane Roe

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NEWS
August 11, 1995 | JESSE KATZ and LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The woman whose unwanted pregnancy helped establish the legal right to an abortion nearly a quarter of a century ago said Thursday that she now believes abortion is wrong and pledged to begin "helping women save their babies." "Once you know the realities of an abortion and what goes along with it, it stays with you," said Norma McCorvey, better known as the pseudonymous Jane Roe of the landmark 1973 Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court decision.
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NATIONAL
February 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a challenge to its landmark 1973 ruling legalizing abortion by the woman once known as Jane Roe, who was at the center of the historic case. Without comment, justices declined to hear the appeal from Norma McCorvey and thus dodged a charged political debate. McCorvey's protest of Texas' abortion ban led to the Roe vs. Wade ruling establishing a constitutional right to abortion.
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NEWS
June 28, 1990 | Joseph N. Bell
Norma McCorvey--whom most of us know better as the Jane Roe of Roe vs. Wade--has been living quietly in Orange County for the last six months, which is just the way she wants it. She left Dallas last year in a volley of gunfire and hard feelings, and she has no desire to risk that again. For the first time since she became by pure accident two decades ago the central figure in one of the most controversial decisions ever handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court, she has found some inner peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1995 | From Religion News Service
When Operation Rescue opened an office in Dallas next door to the abortion clinic where Norma McCorvey worked, the woman who had by then become the symbol of the abortion-rights movement took to taunting Operation Rescue's leader, the Rev. Flip Benham, with insults and gallows humor.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | From Times wire services
The woman known as "Jane Roe" in the landmark Supreme Court ruling legalizing abortion has gone into hiding indefinitely after three shotgun blasts were fired at her home and car, her roommate said today. "She's real emotional right now," Connie Gonzales, Norma McCorvey's roommate, said. "She cries and cries." At 4:45 a.m. Tuesday, someone in a car fired a .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1995 | SUSAN CARPENTER McMILLAN, Susan Carpenter McMillan is a television commentator in Los Angeles and spokesperson for the Woman's Coalition.
I felt strange watching the face on TV that had for too many years been the symbol of everything I vehemently opposed. It was the face of legalized abortion. The face of tragedy. The face of Norma McCorvey. Through the years I had seen her on various news programs, as the "Jane Roe" of Roe vs. Wade, which in one broad sweep had overturned all protective laws for unborn humans and opened the floodgates of destruction through the ninth month of pregnancy.
NEWS
April 6, 1989
Dallas police searched for a gunman who shot out two windows and a glass door at the home of "Jane Roe," the woman whose pregnancy led to the legalization of abortion. Norma McCorvey, 41, who went by the pseudonym Jane Roe in the Roe vs. Wade abortion case, was shaken by the shooting at 4:30 a.m. Tuesday, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989
In "Roe vs. Wade" Jane Roe's proposed solution to her emotional agony was to kill her unborn child to protect it from possible abuse by adoptive parents. Those who believe a fetus is a human believe the baby would have suffered greatly during the abortion. So this was a decision made for Jane Roe's sake, not the baby's. Also, Jane was prejudging adoptive parents' lack of love, ignoring the fact that people who adopt are probably less likely than natural parents to abuse a child.
NATIONAL
February 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a challenge to its landmark 1973 ruling legalizing abortion by the woman once known as Jane Roe, who was at the center of the historic case. Without comment, justices declined to hear the appeal from Norma McCorvey and thus dodged a charged political debate. McCorvey's protest of Texas' abortion ban led to the Roe vs. Wade ruling establishing a constitutional right to abortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1995 | SUSAN CARPENTER McMILLAN, Susan Carpenter McMillan is a television commentator in Los Angeles and spokesperson for the Woman's Coalition.
I felt strange watching the face on TV that had for too many years been the symbol of everything I vehemently opposed. It was the face of legalized abortion. The face of tragedy. The face of Norma McCorvey. Through the years I had seen her on various news programs, as the "Jane Roe" of Roe vs. Wade, which in one broad sweep had overturned all protective laws for unborn humans and opened the floodgates of destruction through the ninth month of pregnancy.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was a ninth-grade dropout thrust at random into the headlights of a divisive social movement--but she was also a powerful symbol. It's no wonder, analysts say, she flipped over last week from the complex, intellectual ideology of the abortion rights movement to the security of a fundamentalist faith dedicated to "saving babies." Norma McCorvey, they say, is a classic religious convert, a woman searching for meaning and structure in an ambivalent world. For many years, McCorvey was the silent, invisible "Jane Roe" plaintiff in the landmark 1973 Roe vs. Wade ruling.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | JESSE KATZ and LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The woman whose unwanted pregnancy helped establish the legal right to an abortion nearly a quarter of a century ago said Thursday that she now believes abortion is wrong and pledged to begin "helping women save their babies." "Once you know the realities of an abortion and what goes along with it, it stays with you," said Norma McCorvey, better known as the pseudonymous Jane Roe of the landmark 1973 Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court decision.
OPINION
July 22, 1990 | Laurence H. Tribe, Laurence H. Tribe's most recent book is "Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes" (Norton), from which this is excerpted. He is the Tyler Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard University
Most people are torn by the abortion question. There is something deeply misleading about discussing the abortion debate solely in terms of a clash between pro-life "groups" and pro-choice "groups," as though each of us could properly be labeled as belonging to one camp or the other. For nearly everyone, the deepest truth is that the clash is internal. Few people who really permit themselves to feel all of what is at stake in the abortion issue can avoid a profound sense of internal division.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | Joseph N. Bell
Norma McCorvey--whom most of us know better as the Jane Roe of Roe vs. Wade--has been living quietly in Orange County for the last six months, which is just the way she wants it. She left Dallas last year in a volley of gunfire and hard feelings, and she has no desire to risk that again. For the first time since she became by pure accident two decades ago the central figure in one of the most controversial decisions ever handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court, she has found some inner peace.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Roe vs. Wade, the landmark 1973 case in which the U.S. Supreme Court established a woman's right to have an abortion, will be dramatized in a TV movie for NBC, entertainment division President Brandon Tartikoff said Tuesday. Tartikoff's announcement, made at the annual National Assn.
OPINION
July 22, 1990 | Laurence H. Tribe, Laurence H. Tribe's most recent book is "Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes" (Norton), from which this is excerpted. He is the Tyler Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard University
Most people are torn by the abortion question. There is something deeply misleading about discussing the abortion debate solely in terms of a clash between pro-life "groups" and pro-choice "groups," as though each of us could properly be labeled as belonging to one camp or the other. For nearly everyone, the deepest truth is that the clash is internal. Few people who really permit themselves to feel all of what is at stake in the abortion issue can avoid a profound sense of internal division.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
They tell strikingly similar personal histories. Both say they were born to dirt-poor families in the South, both were high-school dropouts who were married as teen-agers to abusive men and, for much of their lives, both have led turbulent, Gypsy-like existences. Sixteen years ago, they both also were immortalized in American law in companion cases--the well-known Roe vs. Wade and the obscure but no less judicially important Doe vs. Bolton--which established a constitutional right for women to have abortions.
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