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Jane Sara Olson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the Los Angeles County district attorney's office gets its way, the revolution will not be televised. Gavel to gavel coverage of the trial of Symbionese Liberation Army fugitive Sara Jane Olson "will hinder law enforcement and be detrimental to public safety," prosecutors said Thursday, opposing a request for television cameras at the trial, to begin Feb. 7. At most trials, the defense objects to television coverage, while the prosecution remains xneutral. But this is not most trials.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1976 indictment against Sara Jane Olson accuses her of plotting to plant pipe bombs under police cars, but a Los Angeles Superior Court judge said Monday that prosecutors can show jurors evidence of nearly two dozen other crimes--including two murders and a kidnapping. Judge James M. Ideman gave Deputy Dist. Attys. Eleanor Hunter and Michael Latin the green light to delve into details of 23 crimes attributed to the notorious Symbionese Liberation Army during its violent, 22-month campaign.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1976 indictment against Sara Jane Olson accuses her of plotting to plant pipe bombs under police cars, but a Los Angeles Superior Court judge said Monday that prosecutors can show jurors evidence of nearly two dozen other crimes--including two murders and a kidnapping. Judge James M. Ideman gave Deputy Dist. Attys. Eleanor Hunter and Michael Latin the green light to delve into details of 23 crimes attributed to the notorious Symbionese Liberation Army during its violent, 22-month campaign.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in 1975, they were revolutionaries--Teko and Yolanda--the gun-toting, rhetoric-spewing leaders of the notorious Symbionese Liberation Army. These college sweethearts out of Indiana helped kidnap heiress Patty Hearst, saw six of their comrades incinerated in an armed standoff with Los Angeles police, and led the FBI on one of the biggest, most publicized manhunts in U.S. history. Today, settled and gone gray, the former firebrands, Bill and Emily Harris, have become downright upright.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in 1975, they were revolutionaries--Teko and Yolanda--the gun-toting, rhetoric-spewing leaders of the notorious Symbionese Liberation Army. These college sweethearts out of Indiana helped kidnap heiress Patty Hearst, saw six of their comrades incinerated in an armed standoff with Los Angeles police, and led the FBI on one of the biggest, most publicized manhunts in U.S. history. Today, settled and gone gray, the former firebrands, Bill and Emily Harris, have become downright upright.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the Los Angeles County district attorney's office gets its way, the revolution will not be televised. Gavel to gavel coverage of the trial of Symbionese Liberation Army fugitive Sara Jane Olson "will hinder law enforcement and be detrimental to public safety," prosecutors said Thursday, opposing a request for television cameras at the trial, to begin Feb. 7. At most trials, the defense objects to television coverage, while the prosecution remains xneutral. But this is not most trials.
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