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Jane Vandenburgh

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Stolen Pleasures Selected Stories Gina Berriault Counterpoint: 296 pp., $15.95 paper No one else ends a story like Gina Berriault. It's her signature, the focus to her fiction: that edge of, yes, epiphany. In "A Dream of Fair Women," a restaurant worker, newly single, remains oddly disengaged as her boss falls dead in the dining room of a heart attack. Later, she awakens in the middle of the night, stirred not by loss but by "gratefulness that her love, no longer there, was taken from her only by the dream, only by that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Stolen Pleasures Selected Stories Gina Berriault Counterpoint: 296 pp., $15.95 paper No one else ends a story like Gina Berriault. It's her signature, the focus to her fiction: that edge of, yes, epiphany. In "A Dream of Fair Women," a restaurant worker, newly single, remains oddly disengaged as her boss falls dead in the dining room of a heart attack. Later, she awakens in the middle of the night, stirred not by loss but by "gratefulness that her love, no longer there, was taken from her only by the dream, only by that.
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NEWS
May 5, 1989 | MONA GABLE, Mona Gable is a Los Angeles writer
Established novelist Mary Gordon was a guest on the show. So was critic and biographer James Atlas. Then there was first-time novelist Jane Vandenburgh. "I pronounced myself a Valley girl," Vandenburgh says with a grin. Vandenburgh, who grew up in Northridge, is talking about her performance the week before on the very highbrow PBS series, "Bookmark." She was there plugging her first novel, "Failure to Zigzag" (North Point Press: $16.95), a darkly funny mother-daughter story set in Southern California in the late '50s and early '60s.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One insidious problem stemming from political correctness--for me, anyway--is that I sometimes find myself thinking in its terms even when I don't intend to. It's not always a question of approving or disapproving: It has simply become hard not to notice, in one film or book, macho women (hear them roar?) gamely defying sexist stereotypes and, in another, retro women strangely devoid of assertiveness.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One insidious problem stemming from political correctness--for me, anyway--is that I sometimes find myself thinking in its terms even when I don't intend to. It's not always a question of approving or disapproving: It has simply become hard not to notice, in one film or book, macho women (hear them roar?) gamely defying sexist stereotypes and, in another, retro women strangely devoid of assertiveness.
MAGAZINE
August 9, 1992
Too many people have read, and imitated, Ann Beattie. And now, thanks to your publication of "The Arsenic Hour" (by Jane Vandenburgh), the fashion of "spare" prose (and I mean uncrafted, immature prose, riddled with stereotype) will only continue. I wonder if I am the only reader who considers this sort of fiction a big gyp. JEAN PEHRSON San Diego
MAGAZINE
December 11, 1988 | JANE VANDENBURGH
' "Nice weather," they'd say, looking up, squinting. "Yup, another nice day." ' From the novel "Failure to Zigzag," by Jane Vandenburgh, to be published in April by North Point Press, Berkeley. THE CLIMATE OF Southern California, Charlotte had read somewhere, was half wind and half water. Having never been to any other place, however, she had no way of knowing what it would feel like to be in real weather.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | ELAINE KENDALL
Failure to Zigzag by Jane Vandenburgh (North Point Press: $16.95; 329 pages) If you saw 14-year-old Charlotte and her mother, Katrinka, at the soda fountain in Montrose, you'd think they were winding up a mother-daughter shopping trip, but if you were within earshot, you'd soon realize that this was no ordinary excursion. Katrinka is loudly insisting she's being pursued by teams of psychiatrists from Camarillo; Charlotte is desperately trying to calm her down. After the first few sentences, it's plain that Katrinka is no delightfully madcap mom but a woman temporarily furloughed from the mental hospital; not madcap but truly mad. From that point on, pleasure in the mordant satire and witty dialogue is edged with guilt and pity for the child who so valiantly attempts to understand and cope.
MAGAZINE
September 5, 1993 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is the magazine's staff writer. Her last article was "Shinto Meets Chanel," about the crown prince and princess of Japan
WE BEGIN WITH THE PALMS, TOWering imperiously over Beverly Drive, lazily looping MacArthur Park, silently swaying to the beat of Pasadena's Rose Parade as frigid Easterners look on enviously. We begin with the palms because they so often do, the storytellers who bottle the essence of Southern California, spraying its seductive mist on the rest of the world. Like its chaotic citizenry, most of Southern California's palms are recent transplants, squatters on the natural flora.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | MONA GABLE, Mona Gable is a Los Angeles writer
Established novelist Mary Gordon was a guest on the show. So was critic and biographer James Atlas. Then there was first-time novelist Jane Vandenburgh. "I pronounced myself a Valley girl," Vandenburgh says with a grin. Vandenburgh, who grew up in Northridge, is talking about her performance the week before on the very highbrow PBS series, "Bookmark." She was there plugging her first novel, "Failure to Zigzag" (North Point Press: $16.95), a darkly funny mother-daughter story set in Southern California in the late '50s and early '60s.
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