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October 19, 2003 | Jane Yolen
The first time down, we saw him in the grass, Flagged by the white breast, the broad brown wings. Now we count on him each time we pass, Our talisman, mascot. What luck he brings We cannot know yet, not for weeks and weeks. We must endure your sores, your aches, your pains, Your quiet separation, your midday peaks, And the guarded optimism at your gains. What does the hawk mean? Nothing more Than a buteo on the hunt in a field.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2012 | Alice Short
Curse of the Thirteenth Fey The True Tale of Sleeping Beauty Jane Yolen Philomel: 256 pp., $16.99; for readers 10 and older -- We love fairy tales. Every culture offers them up: Scandinavians, Nigerians, Indonesians. Their commonality -- and the constant on-passing from parent to child -- attests to their endurance. It's as though they are somehow encoded in our DNA. Theories abound about their importance in our social evolution: Tales of abandonment, death and monstrous behavior allow children to deal with their fears in an age-appropriate manner.
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NEWS
May 3, 1989
The National Year of the Young Reader and the Judy Lopez Memorial Children's Book Award will be celebrated at a banquet on May 16 at the Sportsmen's Lodge in Studio City. Co-sponsors of the event are the Judy Lopez Memorial Foundation, the Los Angeles Chapter of the Women's National Book Assn., Southern California Children's Booksellers' Assn., Friends of Children and Libraries and the Society of Children's Book Writers. Highlighting the evening will be presentation of the fourth annual Judy Lopez Memorial Children's Book Award to Betty Levin for "The Trouble with Gramery" (Greenwillow Books)
BOOKS
July 17, 2005 | Anne Boles Levy, Anne Boles Levy, a reviewer whose work has appeared in The Times, writes a children's book blog at www.bookbuds.net.
If your baby brother's a devil and you see nothing but darkness in the adults around you, you're probably just imagining things. But then, what do grown-ups know? Not much, at least when it comes to conjuring fantasy and science-fiction stories pitched to teens. It ought to be a natural fit: Teens have an outsized number of dragons to slay, metaphorically speaking, including dating to underage drinking, and don't yet know they're not invincible.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something happened to actress Kirsten Dunst while making Showtime's Holocaust drama, "The Devil's Arithmetic," in Lithuania last fall. She grew up. "I went to Lithuania more of a child," explains the 16-year-old Dunst. "I have matured so much after this film. I learned so much about life and everything." Adapted by Robert J. Avrech from the popular novel by Jane Yolen, "Devil's Arithmetic"' centers on Hannah (Dunst), a spoiled Jewish teenager whose comfortable life in New Rochelle, N.Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2012 | Alice Short
Curse of the Thirteenth Fey The True Tale of Sleeping Beauty Jane Yolen Philomel: 256 pp., $16.99; for readers 10 and older -- We love fairy tales. Every culture offers them up: Scandinavians, Nigerians, Indonesians. Their commonality -- and the constant on-passing from parent to child -- attests to their endurance. It's as though they are somehow encoded in our DNA. Theories abound about their importance in our social evolution: Tales of abandonment, death and monstrous behavior allow children to deal with their fears in an age-appropriate manner.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | PENELOPE MOFFET
The blank page is God's way of letting you know how hard it is to be God. --Writer Craig Vetter, as quoted by writer Bob Reichle. That saying spoke directly to the subject of Bob Reichle's workshop--"Writer's Block and Reader's Block: Nazi Voices in the Brain"--recently at the seventh annual "Writing for Your Life" conference at Loyola Marymount University.
BOOKS
July 17, 2005 | Anne Boles Levy, Anne Boles Levy, a reviewer whose work has appeared in The Times, writes a children's book blog at www.bookbuds.net.
If your baby brother's a devil and you see nothing but darkness in the adults around you, you're probably just imagining things. But then, what do grown-ups know? Not much, at least when it comes to conjuring fantasy and science-fiction stories pitched to teens. It ought to be a natural fit: Teens have an outsized number of dragons to slay, metaphorically speaking, including dating to underage drinking, and don't yet know they're not invincible.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few things define a culture as well as its myths and celebrations, those traditional folkloric tales and festivals that are passed down through generations to explain and venerate everything from the rising of the sun to the changing of the seasons. And in a place like Southern California, where people from more than 100 distinct cultures live, work, study and play together on a daily basis, these tales can't help but cross cultures, forming the hybrids that we pass on to our children.
BOOKS
May 11, 2003
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* SO. CAL. RATING *--* *--* 1 How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague (Blue Sky Press, $15.95) Sniffly dinosaurs misbehave when their moms and dads take them to see the doctor. Ages 4-8 2 The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke (Scholastic, $16.95) Two brothers run away from their aunt and arrive in Venice, where they take up with a band of young thieves led by a skillful young boy.
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Jane Yolen
The first time down, we saw him in the grass, Flagged by the white breast, the broad brown wings. Now we count on him each time we pass, Our talisman, mascot. What luck he brings We cannot know yet, not for weeks and weeks. We must endure your sores, your aches, your pains, Your quiet separation, your midday peaks, And the guarded optimism at your gains. What does the hawk mean? Nothing more Than a buteo on the hunt in a field.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something happened to actress Kirsten Dunst while making Showtime's Holocaust drama, "The Devil's Arithmetic," in Lithuania last fall. She grew up. "I went to Lithuania more of a child," explains the 16-year-old Dunst. "I have matured so much after this film. I learned so much about life and everything." Adapted by Robert J. Avrech from the popular novel by Jane Yolen, "Devil's Arithmetic"' centers on Hannah (Dunst), a spoiled Jewish teenager whose comfortable life in New Rochelle, N.Y.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few things define a culture as well as its myths and celebrations, those traditional folkloric tales and festivals that are passed down through generations to explain and venerate everything from the rising of the sun to the changing of the seasons. And in a place like Southern California, where people from more than 100 distinct cultures live, work, study and play together on a daily basis, these tales can't help but cross cultures, forming the hybrids that we pass on to our children.
NEWS
May 3, 1989
The National Year of the Young Reader and the Judy Lopez Memorial Children's Book Award will be celebrated at a banquet on May 16 at the Sportsmen's Lodge in Studio City. Co-sponsors of the event are the Judy Lopez Memorial Foundation, the Los Angeles Chapter of the Women's National Book Assn., Southern California Children's Booksellers' Assn., Friends of Children and Libraries and the Society of Children's Book Writers. Highlighting the evening will be presentation of the fourth annual Judy Lopez Memorial Children's Book Award to Betty Levin for "The Trouble with Gramery" (Greenwillow Books)
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | PENELOPE MOFFET
The blank page is God's way of letting you know how hard it is to be God. --Writer Craig Vetter, as quoted by writer Bob Reichle. That saying spoke directly to the subject of Bob Reichle's workshop--"Writer's Block and Reader's Block: Nazi Voices in the Brain"--recently at the seventh annual "Writing for Your Life" conference at Loyola Marymount University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2001
Books recommended by Ilene Abramson, senior librarian for the children's literature department, Los Angeles Public Library: Science fiction--New Year's promises are often expressed through books that reach out and stretch the imagination. Preschool: "Hush, Little Alien," by Daniel Kirk To the rhythm of the song "Hush, Little Baby," an alien child is promised a variety of space-related presents but ultimately settles for a good old human-type kiss.
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