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Janella Sue Martin

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BUSINESS
December 22, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janella Sue Martin--who gained national attention after winning a $20-million jury award in a sex discrimination suit against Texaco only to have a judge toss out the decision--has settled her dispute for a sum believed to be less than $2 million. Both sides were under court orders not to discuss the settlement, but sources familiar with the case said Thursday that the pact also calls for Martin, now on paid administrative leave from Texaco, to soon give up her job with the oil company.
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BUSINESS
December 22, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janella Sue Martin--who gained national attention after winning a $20-million jury award in a sex discrimination suit against Texaco only to have a judge toss out the decision--has settled her dispute for a sum believed to be less than $2 million. Both sides were under court orders not to discuss the settlement, but sources familiar with the case said Thursday that the pact also calls for Martin, now on paid administrative leave from Texaco, to soon give up her job with the oil company.
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BUSINESS
October 3, 1991 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury that originally awarded a Los Angeles woman more than $6 million in a sex-discrimination case against Texaco Inc. cut the damages to $2.6 million Wednesday after acknowledging that it initially had included a punitive sum in its verdict. Lawyers said the award--which could grow again today when the jury returns to consider punitive damages--is still the largest amount awarded to an individual in a sex-discrimination lawsuit.
NEWS
November 27, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janella Sue Martin once was the $20-million woman, the winner of a record-shattering award from a Los Angeles jury in a sex discrimination lawsuit against Texaco. Martin's court victory--against a corporate giant that she claims unfairly denied her job promotions and retaliated after she complained--brought her a "Feminist of the Year" honor and other acclaim from women's rights advocates. She was featured on TV shows and profiled in People magazine.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury awarded more than $6 million to a Los Angeles woman Wednesday in a sex discrimination case against Texaco Inc., an amount that labor attorneys called the largest in the nation ever awarded to one person. Lawyers said Wednesday that the award, which could increase Friday when the same jury will decide punitive damages, sends a strong message to large corporations about the risks of biased promotion practices.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1991
In the recent civil judgment in favor of Janella Sue Martin's sex discrimination claim against Texaco Inc. ("Award in Sex Bias Case Raised to $17.6 Million," Oct. 4), Martin claimed that Texaco systematically excludes women from upper-level management jobs. The jury awarded her $2.65 million in compensatory damages and $15 million in punitive damages. Who is entitled to receive the punitive damage award? Let's assume the judgment was fair. Martin filed the suit, but why should she be entitled to the punitive damage settlement for wrongs that harmed many women?
BUSINESS
July 21, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision upsetting the largest single award in a sex discrimination case, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ordered a new trial on charges brought against Texaco by long-time employee Janella Sue Martin. The judge's ruling essentially throws out last year's jury verdict in Martin's favor, the jury's award of $20.3 million in damages and the judge's own decision, made earlier this year, that Texaco must promote Martin. In his ruling last Friday, Judge Ronald E.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury awarded more than $6 million to a Los Angeles woman Wednesday in a sex-discrimination case against Texaco Inc. Labor attorneys said it was the largest amount ever awarded to an individual . Lawyers said Wednesday that the award, which could be increased Friday when the same jury decides on punitive damages, sends a strong message to large corporations about the risks in biased promotion practices.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ordered Texaco to promote Janella Sue Martin, the 48-year-old credit supervisor who last year won the largest jury award ever in a sex discrimination suit. While Texaco hinted Tuesday that it was prepared to appeal, Martin and her attorney said the ruling by Judge Ronald E. Cappai vindicates Martin's fight and the $20.3 million in damages the jury awarded last October. Attorneys for both sides received notice of Cappai's ruling late Monday.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 48-year-old woman passed over for promotion and then fired from La Jolla-based Science Applications International Corp. won $3.1 million in court Tuesday, the largest award ever issued by a San Diego County jury in a sex discrimination suit. Bernice Stanfill of Del Mar, who worked her way up in 16 years at SAIC from secretary to corporate vice president, was passed over for promotion in favor of one man, then another a few years later.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision upsetting the largest single award in a sex discrimination case, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ordered a new trial on charges brought against Texaco by long-time employee Janella Sue Martin. The judge's ruling essentially throws out last year's jury verdict in Martin's favor, the jury's award of $20.3 million in damages and the judge's own decision, made earlier this year, that Texaco must promote Martin. In his ruling last Friday, Judge Ronald E.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 48-year-old woman passed over for promotion and then fired from La Jolla-based Science Applications International Corp. won $3.1 million in court Tuesday, the largest award ever issued by a San Diego County jury in a sex discrimination suit. Bernice Stanfill of Del Mar, who worked her way up in 16 years at SAIC from secretary to corporate vice president, was passed over for promotion in favor of one man, then another a few years later.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ordered Texaco to promote Janella Sue Martin, the 48-year-old credit supervisor who last year won the largest jury award ever in a sex discrimination suit. While Texaco hinted Tuesday that it was prepared to appeal, Martin and her attorney said the ruling by Judge Ronald E. Cappai vindicates Martin's fight and the $20.3 million in damages the jury awarded last October. Attorneys for both sides received notice of Cappai's ruling late Monday.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1991
In the recent civil judgment in favor of Janella Sue Martin's sex discrimination claim against Texaco Inc. ("Award in Sex Bias Case Raised to $17.6 Million," Oct. 4), Martin claimed that Texaco systematically excludes women from upper-level management jobs. The jury awarded her $2.65 million in compensatory damages and $15 million in punitive damages. Who is entitled to receive the punitive damage award? Let's assume the judgment was fair. Martin filed the suit, but why should she be entitled to the punitive damage settlement for wrongs that harmed many women?
BUSINESS
October 4, 1991 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury on Thursday awarded a Los Angeles woman $15 million in punitive damages in a sex discrimination case against Texaco Refining & Marketing Inc., bringing her total award up to a record $17.6 million. Legal experts said the award was the largest ever granted to an individual in a sex discrimination case.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1991 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury that originally awarded a Los Angeles woman more than $6 million in a sex-discrimination case against Texaco Inc. cut the damages to $2.6 million Wednesday after acknowledging that it initially had included a punitive sum in its verdict. Lawyers said the award--which could grow again today when the jury returns to consider punitive damages--is still the largest amount awarded to an individual in a sex-discrimination lawsuit.
NEWS
November 27, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janella Sue Martin once was the $20-million woman, the winner of a record-shattering award from a Los Angeles jury in a sex discrimination lawsuit against Texaco. Martin's court victory--against a corporate giant that she claims unfairly denied her job promotions and retaliated after she complained--brought her a "Feminist of the Year" honor and other acclaim from women's rights advocates. She was featured on TV shows and profiled in People magazine.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1991 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury on Thursday awarded a Los Angeles woman $15 million in punitive damages in a sex discrimination case against Texaco Refining & Marketing Inc., bringing her total award up to a record $17.6 million. Legal experts said the award was the largest ever granted to an individual in a sex discrimination case.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury awarded more than $6 million to a Los Angeles woman Wednesday in a sex discrimination case against Texaco Inc., an amount that labor attorneys called the largest in the nation ever awarded to one person. Lawyers said Wednesday that the award, which could increase Friday when the same jury will decide punitive damages, sends a strong message to large corporations about the risks of biased promotion practices.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury awarded more than $6 million to a Los Angeles woman Wednesday in a sex-discrimination case against Texaco Inc. Labor attorneys said it was the largest amount ever awarded to an individual . Lawyers said Wednesday that the award, which could be increased Friday when the same jury decides on punitive damages, sends a strong message to large corporations about the risks in biased promotion practices.
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