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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | Elysa Gardner
Seldom has a mouse roared more loudly or gloriously than Janet Jackson. When she embarked on a recording career 15 years ago, few could have guessed that this tentative-sounding young singer would ultimately outrank her prodigiously gifted brother, Michael, as the most consistently exciting entertainer in pop music's most famous family.
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NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The former top watchdog for the Homeland Security Department rewrote reports and slowed investigations at the request of senior staff for then-Secretary Janet Napolitano, a review conducted by Senate staff found. Charles K. Edwards, who was acting inspector general for Homeland Security from late 2011 through early 2013, considered aides to Napolitano to be friends, socialized with them over drinks and dinner and, at their urging, improperly made changes to several investigative reports, according to the Senate review released Thursday.
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OPINION
December 7, 1997
What part of janet reNO don't you understand? LYLE TALBOT Lancaster
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Janet L. Yellen, who broke the Federal Reserve's glass ceiling, marks two more milestones Wednesday, wrapping up her initial policymaking meeting as chairwoman then facing reporters' questions for the first time since taking office last month. The Fed chair's quarterly news conferences have drawn great attention since her predecessor, Ben S. Bernanke, began holding them in 2011 to improve public understanding of the central bank's actions. Now Yellen takes over the tradition, which adds an additional challenge to the job as financial markets try to interpret every answer for signs of the Fed's direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Take "Lost," mash it up with "The Prisoner," throw in a little "Saw," over-season with badly written and poorly delivered dialogue, glaze with horror-film lighting, dream-scene camerawork and elevators like you haven't seen since "The Shining," and you've got "Persons Unknown," the new mystery- drama premiering on NBC Monday night. Seven strangers wake up to find themselves in a creepy hotel in the middle of an otherwise empty Rockwellian town. They have no idea why anyone would want to kidnap them, mainly because they are so very uninteresting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2000 | Dana Bushee, (714) 966-5636
Pastor Bayless Conley of Cottonwood Christian Center will attend Friday's inauguration of Mexico's President Elect Vincente Fox. Conley and his wife, Janet, were invited to attend the Mexico City event as representatives of the United States. Conley, who is seen on Fox Family Television and locally weekday mornings on KCAL-TV Channel 9, is spearheading plans to build a church in Cypress for his 4,000-member congregation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Laurel Green has one of the best screams in the business, and Justin Tanner never tires of inventing pressure-cooker situations in which Green's shriek can break free in all of its hysterical glory. In "Coyote Woman," his new play at the Cast Theatre in Hollywood, he's come up with a doozy. Green plays Janet, a secretary living in Silver Lake with a nicer, looser roommate named Debbie (Dana Schwartz). Janet is dullsville--priggish, petty, bratty.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Janet and her husband have a vacation timeshare, which they like. What they don't like are the annual dues, which have risen to $3,500. Janet wants to know: If they stop making payments, can the timeshare company place a lien on their home? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions It seems like lots of people find themselves in a similar position. They sign up for a timeshare thinking it will save money on vacations, and then discover that they're locked in to a system they don't like or are paying far more money than they originally thought.
OPINION
December 25, 2010 | By David McGrath
Janet, our youngest child, was the last to leave home, setting up house with Kevin. And now she is preparing for the first Christmas in their new place, 1,500 miles away. I won't use the word "stubborn," but Janet has always been independent, and she is intent on establishing their own holiday tradition. But a dozen phone calls in early December made clear her need to replicate aspects of holidays growing up in our home. "You sent her the Christmas stockings, right?" I asked my wife.
BOOKS
December 29, 1985 | ELISSA RABELLINO
DIVORCING YOUR GRANDMOTHER by Jean Gould (Morrow: $15.95). Kate, married to George, a psychiatrist, is having an affair with Charlie. Charlie is married to Janet, a patient of George. High-spirited Kate loves Charlie's zaniness, in sharp contrast to the stolid security provided by George, whom she has known since childhood. The story begins on the eve of Kate's hysterectomy to remove a cancer.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Janet and her husband have a vacation timeshare, which they like. What they don't like are the annual dues, which have risen to $3,500. Janet wants to know: If they stop making payments, can the timeshare company place a lien on their home? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions It seems like lots of people find themselves in a similar position. They sign up for a timeshare thinking it will save money on vacations, and then discover that they're locked in to a system they don't like or are paying far more money than they originally thought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
“The media's insatiable appetite for transsexual women's bodies contributes to the systematic othering of trans women as modern-day freak shows, portrayals that validate and feed society's dismissal and dehumanization of trans women.” - Janet Mock, in her new memoir “Redefining Realness” Well, Piers Morgan stepped right into that one. This week, the CNN host caused a stir for what some say was his insensitive handling of an...
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The nomination of former Bank of Israel head Stanley Fischer to be Janet Yellen's lieutenant gives the Federal Reserve a "Dream Team" in the top two positions,  Pimco Chief Executive Mohamed El-Erian said Monday. Fischer was the "most inspired choice" of a slate of three nominees announced Friday by the White House, El-Erian said in an opinion column for CNBC. The others were former Treasury official Lael Brainard, and Jerome Powell, a Fed governor since 2012 whose term expires on Jan. 31. El-Erian said the three nominees "form a well-balanced and strong slate at a particularly important time for Fed policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2013 | David Colker
Romance novelist Janet Dailey, who went from secretary to bestselling author with millions of copies of her books sold worldwide, found herself in the midst of a scandal in 1997 that could have been a career-ender. But in her world, the heroine always found a way to overcome dire straits. In Dailey's "Night of the Cotillion" (1977), Amanda finds love with Jarod, though he mocks her early on for being "wrapped up in those romantic notions ... and the happily-ever-afters. " In "For the Love of God" (1981)
NATIONAL
December 20, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - In its last workday of the year, the Democratic-controlled Senate overcame GOP objections Friday to confirm two high-profile Obama nominees to the Department of Homeland Security and the Internal Revenue Service, but put off final approval of Federal Reserve chairwoman candidate Janet L. Yellen until January as part of a late-night cease-fire so lawmakers could adjourn for the holiday recess. After heated debate, the Senate narrowly approved Alejandro Mayorkas, President Obama's controversial pick for the No. 2 job at Homeland Security, in a 54-41 vote.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee
WASHINGTON - Now that the Federal Reserve has started to ease a key economic stimulus, the reins of managing monetary policy to finish the job soon will be turned over to Janet L. Yellen, the central bank's vice chair. She won't find it easy. Yellen, expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Saturday as the Fed's first female chief, will be leading a very different and potentially more fractious policymaking team at the central bank. A more divisive group could be particularly nettlesome as she tries to execute the complicated exit from the Fed's unprecedented actions to stimulate the economy after the Great Recession.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
There's this new drug everybody's talking about--you know the one. If you've forgotten the name of it, take a look at every other headline in the paper. It's for men. It's blue. It's a comedian's dream. According to medical reports, it's the best thing to happen to the sexually challenged American male since the little red Corvette. But it takes no prescription, in fact, no pill at all, to change your ordinary, run-of-the-mill female into a Coyote Woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2000 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The art of subtext in playwriting--in which a character says one thing, but is thinking something else--has almost become lost in the current theater, where on-the-nose dialogue is king. Except subtext is how real people talk in the real world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | Cynthia Dizikes
When Janet Rowley was accepted into the University of Chicago's medical school in 1944, the quota for women was already filled - three in a class of 65. So she had to wait a year. Dr. Rowley made up for that early setback by becoming an internationally known scientist whose research in the 1970s redefined cancer as a genetic disease and led to a paradigm shift in how it is studied and treated. An advisor to presidents and recipient of her nation's highest honors, Rowley achieved breakthroughs that prolonged the lives of countless cancer patients.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- The nomination of Janet L. Yellen to be the next leader of the Federal Reserve cleared the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday. The panel voted 14 to 8 in favor of the former UC Berkeley professor and current Fed vice chair, with three Republican members joining 11 Democrats in sending the nomination to the Senate floor. If confirmed, Yellen would be the first woman to lead the 100-year-old central bank. Despite GOP efforts that have blocked many of President Obama's picks for various posts, Yellen is expected to be approved by the full chamber in a vote sometime after Thanksgiving.
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