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Janet Chusmir

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NEWS
December 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
Miami Herald Executive Editor Janet Chusmir, a pioneering journalist who guided the newspaper to two Pulitzer Prizes, died Saturday of a brain aneurysm at age 60. She collapsed Friday night at her home in Miami Beach and was rushed to St. Francis Hospital in a coma. She died Saturday morning without regaining consciousness, the Herald said. The collapse came only about an hour after she left the Herald's evening news meeting and stopped at desks to extend holiday wishes to reporters and editors.
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NEWS
December 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
Miami Herald Executive Editor Janet Chusmir, a pioneering journalist who guided the newspaper to two Pulitzer Prizes, died Saturday of a brain aneurysm at age 60. She collapsed Friday night at her home in Miami Beach and was rushed to St. Francis Hospital in a coma. She died Saturday morning without regaining consciousness, the Herald said. The collapse came only about an hour after she left the Herald's evening news meeting and stopped at desks to extend holiday wishes to reporters and editors.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
To the personnel office, Janet Chusmir seemed a bad risk. She was a 33-year-old housewife with two adolescent kids and no job experience. It was 1963, and even though the job was just women's editor of the tiny Miami Beach Daily Sun, a community paper owned as a sideline by some executives of the Miami Herald, the word came down from personnel: Skip her. The Sun failed to take that advice.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
To the personnel office, Janet Chusmir seemed a bad risk. She was a 33-year-old housewife with two adolescent kids and no job experience. It was 1963, and even though the job was just women's editor of the tiny Miami Beach Daily Sun, a community paper owned as a sideline by some executives of the Miami Herald, the word came down from personnel: Skip her. The Sun failed to take that advice.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1987
Janet Chusmir, president and publisher of the Daily Camera in Boulder, Colo., will become executive editor of the Miami Herald in May, replacing Heath Meriwether. Meriwether, 43, who has held the post since July, 1983, will assume another role in the Knight-Ridder organization, which owns the Herald and the Daily Camera. Chusmir, 57, was a member of the Herald staff from 1968 to 1982.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1988
Jane Amsterdam, a magazine and book editor, will be the next editor of the New York Post, the newspaper's new owner, Peter S. Kalikow, announced. Amsterdam will be the sixth woman at the editorial helm of an American newspaper of greater than 100,000 circulation, according to the American Society of Newspaper Editors. It marks the second time a woman has been named a top editor at a newspaper with more than 250,000 circulation. Out of the 38 largest U.S.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The federal court of appeals ruling Friday that the press has a right to change quotations in stories and sometimes even fabricate them may be one case in which judges are granting freedoms to the press that most journalists don't want. At least they don't want them now that the tape recorder has come along. If quotes don't mean anything, said Bill Kovach, director of the Neiman Foundation for Journalism, "you might as well eliminate the definition of a quotation mark."
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | DAVID SHAW, Times Staff Writer
Many newspaper reporters are lazy, careless, cynical and inclined toward exaggeration, speculation and sensationalism. Worse, they often decide what their stories should say before they even begin their interviews and research. Who offers this scathing indictment of the nation's press? Gary Hart? Ed Meese? Nancy Reagan? Richard Nixon? No, not this time. These criticisms were made by many of America's top newspaper editors (and other prominent journalists). The basis of their criticism?
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stung by criticism that they either ignore minorities or cover them in a negative, superficial and sensationalized fashion, a number of major newspapers around the country have made serious efforts to present a more balanced picture of minority life. No paper has been more diligent or innovative in this than USA Today. Almost every day, in keeping with its basic design formula, USA Today publishes four photographs on the top half of Page 1.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas Greer was fed up. Here he was--managing editor of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, a proud and successful black man--and yet every time his newspaper's photographers came back to the office with photographs of fans at a Browns' football game, the photos showed only white people. Cleveland was more than 40% black, and Greer "didn't see how five or six photographers could shoot a crowd of 80,000 people and come back with only white faces."
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