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Janet Cooke

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Mike Sager tells it, the letter arrived 18 months ago, written by Janet Cooke in her choolteacher hand. The proposal: that he, as her former boyfriend and Washington Post colleague, tell her story at last. Before the 12,000-word piece even surfaced in the June issue of GQ, Hollywood jumped in head-first. In a May 16 bidding war, TriStar Pictures committed a whopping $1.6 million for the movie rights, payable in full when principal photography begins.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
These days journalists aren't merely writing headlines. More and more, they're making them -- to their editors' and publishers' chagrin.
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OPINION
July 12, 1998 | Daniel Schorr, Daniel Schorr is a senior news analyst for National Public Radio. He covered Watergate and the CIA investigations for CBS and was senior Washington correspondent for CNN
Some of us journalists have sinned, oh Lord Public, master of our universe. We beg of you to forgive us our press passes. How did we sin? Let me count the ways: 1) By telling you things that we knew were not so; 2) By telling you things we believed to be so, but had not substantiated; 3) By telling you things that were so, but had been acquired by questionable means. Why does there, suddenly, seem to be so much journalistic sinning? Because the public seems to be turned off on the media.
OPINION
July 12, 1998 | Daniel Schorr, Daniel Schorr is a senior news analyst for National Public Radio. He covered Watergate and the CIA investigations for CBS and was senior Washington correspondent for CNN
Some of us journalists have sinned, oh Lord Public, master of our universe. We beg of you to forgive us our press passes. How did we sin? Let me count the ways: 1) By telling you things that we knew were not so; 2) By telling you things we believed to be so, but had not substantiated; 3) By telling you things that were so, but had been acquired by questionable means. Why does there, suddenly, seem to be so much journalistic sinning? Because the public seems to be turned off on the media.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
These days journalists aren't merely writing headlines. More and more, they're making them -- to their editors' and publishers' chagrin.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1996
I just read the story by Elaine Dutka about ex-journalist Janet Cooke and the media frenzy about her return to the public forum ("Janet Cooke's Life: The Picture-Perfect Tale," May 28). I normally don't pay attention to these types of stories, but this one bothered me tremendously. I am a black parent in a constant struggle with teenage children about right and wrong, working hard and doing the right thing, regardless of what they see in the media about people getting away with constant wrongdoing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005
David SHAW must feel threatened by the remarkable rise of the blogger ["Do Bloggers Deserve Basic Journalistic Protections?," March 27]. Part of his concern is that because blogger articles do not get filtered by four different editors, they don't offer reliable or objective news. The one and only time I have put down money to buy a copy of the L.A. Times was a few weeks ago when blogger John Aravosis (of AMERICAblog.com) wrote about prostitute and phony White House journalist "Jeff Gannon," a solid story with huge implications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vivian Aplin-Brownlee, 61, a former Washington Post editor who raised an early alarm concerning a Pulitzer Prize-winning story about an 8-year-old heroin addict who turned out not to exist, died Oct. 20 of complications from leukemia at her Washington home, said her husband, Dennis Brownlee. Aplin-Brownlee had sent an ambitious reporter, Janet Cooke, to check out a report about a new type of heroin on Washington's streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2005
Thanks to David Shaw for an interesting piece on Mitch Albom ["How One Careless Act Became a Really Big Deal," April 24]. It raised interesting points to think about, such as "pre-writing" and lax copy editing for columnists of high stature. I slightly disagree with Shaw about Albom's fate at the Free Press. I think he should have been fired automatically for what he did. His telling readers that Cleaves and Richardson were at the game, when they in fact weren't, was a fabrication of the same type as Jayson Blair's and Stephen Glass'.
NEWS
May 30, 1996
Candid cameras: Researchers are scanning 45 minutes of film taken in Dallas the day of the JFK assassination: * "It turns out Oliver Stone did it." (Steve Tatham) * "Sure enough, it shows the Cowboys' Michael Irvin having a beer with Jack Ruby." (Argus Hamilton) * "It's being released on videotape and, like every other movie, it co-stars Antonio Banderas." (Alex Kaseberg) * "The footage disproves one recent contention: Faye Resnick was not on the grassy knoll."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Mike Sager tells it, the letter arrived 18 months ago, written by Janet Cooke in her choolteacher hand. The proposal: that he, as her former boyfriend and Washington Post colleague, tell her story at last. Before the 12,000-word piece even surfaced in the June issue of GQ, Hollywood jumped in head-first. In a May 16 bidding war, TriStar Pictures committed a whopping $1.6 million for the movie rights, payable in full when principal photography begins.
OPINION
May 30, 2003 | Leon E. Wynter, Leon E. Wynter is author of "American Skin: Pop Culture, Big Business & The End of White America" (Crown, 2002).
Let's skip saying that Jayson Blair doesn't represent me or any other African American working journalist any more than, say, disgraced stock analyst Jack Grubman represents the truth about all white men on Wall Street. Blair's mug shot now hangs with former Washington Post reporter Janet Cooke's in the Black Professionals Hall of Shame, journalism division, but they are not professional black America.
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