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NEWS
June 22, 1989 | MITCH POLIN, Times Staff Writer
When she first competed as a teen-age archer while attending Arroyo High School of El Monte, Janet Dykman displayed flashes of promise. Dykman was talented enough to earn a berth in the Junior Olympic Archery Development program and place high in numerous state and local tournaments. But shortly after graduating from high school in 1972, Dykman left the sport. But from time to time over the next 12 years, Dykman said, she thought about returning. "Every once in a while I'd go back to it but I'd talk myself out of staying," she recalled.
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NEWS
July 30, 1996
Wang Xiaozhi of China, ranked 32nd in the preliminary round, authored the upset special of the women's individual archery competition Monday, beating top-ranked Lina Herasymenko of Ukraine, 156-152, in the second round. Ahead for Wang: Janet Dykman of El Monte. Dykman, ranked 17th, advanced to the round of 16 by beating Sweden's Christa Backman, 156-154, in the morning, then China's Yang Jianping, 156-152, in the afternoon.
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NEWS
July 30, 1996
Wang Xiaozhi of China, ranked 32nd in the preliminary round, authored the upset special of the women's individual archery competition Monday, beating top-ranked Lina Herasymenko of Ukraine, 156-152, in the second round. Ahead for Wang: Janet Dykman of El Monte. Dykman, ranked 17th, advanced to the round of 16 by beating Sweden's Christa Backman, 156-154, in the morning, then China's Yang Jianping, 156-152, in the afternoon.
NEWS
July 20, 1996 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
It was the summer of '84, the Los Angeles Olympics were blooming in all their resplendent glory, and Janet Dykman was falling in love again. There, at the archery venue, stood Karl Rabbe, displaying the latest in archery equipment, earnestly explaining the advances that had brought the sport from Sherwood Forest to the space age. And there, watching him, stood Dykman, eyes shining, heart pounding. Not because of Rabbe, although she did think he was a very nice man.
NEWS
July 20, 1996 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
It was the summer of '84, the Los Angeles Olympics were blooming in all their resplendent glory, and Janet Dykman was falling in love again. There, at the archery venue, stood Karl Rabbe, displaying the latest in archery equipment, earnestly explaining the advances that had brought the sport from Sherwood Forest to the space age. And there, watching him, stood Dykman, eyes shining, heart pounding. Not because of Rabbe, although she did think he was a very nice man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're sharpshooting, quick-thinking, goal-achieving women. But on Wednesday, all they could do was blush. In a send-off fit for a departing army, the city of El Monte honored and--at times--overwhelmed two of its residents who are headed for the Olympics, skeet shooter Kim Rhode and archer Janet Dykman.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | Times Wire Services
American archers, led by Justin Huish of Simi Valley and Janet Dykman of El Monte, trailed in the Olympic ranking rounds, which determine pairings for individual matches. The women's event begins today and the men start Tuesday. Huish had the top finish for the U.S. team with a ninth in the men's event with 670. Michele Frangilli of Italy led with 684, and the Korean men had a total of 2,031, breaking their own world mark of 2,011. Dykman had the top U.S. women's score with 646 to place 17th.
SPORTS
August 13, 2004 | From Associated Press
South Korean archers broke three world records Thursday in men's and women's events in the ranking rounds of the Olympic competition. Park Sung-Hyun set a record of 682 points in the 72-arrow women's competition, breaking the mark of 679 set in May by Italian Natalia Valeeva. The team of Park, Lee Sung-Jin and Yun Mi-Jin also set a record of 2,030 for the 216-arrow event.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Merely the thought of a perfect 10 helped Kim Kyung-Wook become the fourth consecutive South Korean to win the Olympic gold medal in women's archery. Kim had six 10s, two that hit dead center on the target, and five 9s to beat China's He Ying, 113-107, in the championship match. Her worst shot was an 8, which came on her 12th and final shot with the gold virtually clinched. Since 1984, South Korea has won eight of the 12 medals--and all four golds--awarded in women's individual archery.
SPORTS
March 17, 1995 | From Associated Press
Leroy Walker, head of the U.S. delegation to the Pan American Games, reacted Thursday to criticism from Mario Vasquez Rana, the head of the games' organizing committee. Vasquez Rana, referring to the fact that the United States sent 1,202 people, including 746 athletes, Wednesday said, "It's craziness. I don't know why they brought so many. It was a mistake. It's not even good for them." Walker said he took the comments as "almost a personal affront."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're sharpshooting, quick-thinking, goal-achieving women. But on Wednesday, all they could do was blush. In a send-off fit for a departing army, the city of El Monte honored and--at times--overwhelmed two of its residents who are headed for the Olympics, skeet shooter Kim Rhode and archer Janet Dykman.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | MITCH POLIN, Times Staff Writer
When she first competed as a teen-age archer while attending Arroyo High School of El Monte, Janet Dykman displayed flashes of promise. Dykman was talented enough to earn a berth in the Junior Olympic Archery Development program and place high in numerous state and local tournaments. But shortly after graduating from high school in 1972, Dykman left the sport. But from time to time over the next 12 years, Dykman said, she thought about returning. "Every once in a while I'd go back to it but I'd talk myself out of staying," she recalled.
SPORTS
August 22, 1999 | Associated Press
Oscar-winning actress Geena Davis lost her bid to be an Olympic archer, but she said she loves the challenge and will try again in four years. "I think I did well. I was very happy," Davis said Saturday after finishing 24th out of 28 women competing in the semifinals of the U.S. Olympic trials. Davis, 42, made it to the semifinals only two years after taking her first lesson. The top 16 archers advanced to today's second round.
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