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Janet F Mckinzie

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BUSINESS
May 27, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet Faye McKinzie, the first person convicted of federal racketeering in the thrift industry debacle, will be released from prison next week after serving barely four years for her role in the 1987 collapse of North America Savings & Loan in Santa Ana. McKinzie, who helped North America owner Duayne (Doc) Christensen pilfer $13.5 million from the thrift and spend it on lavish gifts and parties, had won a reduction of her 20-year sentence to six years.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 12-person jury was selected Tuesday to hear the case of former real estate broker Janet F. McKinzie's involvement in the collapse of a tiny Orange County thrift. Opening arguments in the case are scheduled to be heard today. McKinzie faces 40 counts of bank fraud, conspiracy and racketeering and could receive more than 200 years in prison if convicted on all counts for her role in the 1987 failure of North America Savings & Loan in Santa Ana.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The final two defendants in the North America Savings & Loan scandal were each sentenced Monday to serve one month in a halfway house and ordered to pay $35,000 in restitution and fines for laundering $1.5 million stolen from the now-defunct thrift. Armando J. Vasquez, 53, and Frederick Youngdahl, 55, were convicted last month of bank fraud for submitting phony invoices to North America and then returning the money they received--minus a $25,000 laundering fee--to thrift Chairman Duayne D.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Stepping up the stakes in their war on fraud in Southern California's troubled thrift industry, federal prosecutors Tuesday unleashed a powerful anti-racketeering law against the former operators and associates of North America Savings & Loan. A 40-count racketeering and fraud indictment, returned by a federal grand jury in Los Angeles against former executive consultant Janet F. McKinzie and five others, alleges that the now-defunct Orange County financial institution operated as a fraudulent enterprise almost since its inception in 1983.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | JAMES S. GRANELLI and JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writers
The FBI and the state attorney general's office said Wednesday they are investigating possible fraud and embezzlement involving up to $20 million at North America Savings & Loan Assn., the Santa Ana institution that was seized by regulators Jan. 16. The state's investigation, spurred by the state Department of Savings and Loan after it seized the $219-million association, is focusing on the role played by the late owner's close friend and business confidante, Janet F.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was clearly no ordinary birthday bash. Hundreds of well-dressed guests had poured into the Newport Beach Marriott in the fall of 1986 and gorged themselves on a boatload of shrimp appetizers and a river of liquor. The full-course meal that followed was served on tables decorated like lily ponds. But the piece de resistance of Janet Faye McKinzie's birthday extravaganza was the entertainment. Some of the guests were shocked to see Sammy Davis Jr.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trial starting today involving defunct North America Savings & Loan is the latest twist in the richly interesting career of Houston attorney Richard (Racehorse) Haynes. The flamboyant Texas lawyer first came to national attention as a subject in the bestseller "Blood and Money" by novelist Tommy Thompson.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
A 12-person jury was selected Tuesday to hear the bizarre case of former real estate broker Janet Faye McKinzie's involvement in the collapse of a tiny Orange County thrift. Opening arguments in the case are scheduled to be heard today. McKinzie faces 40 counts of bank fraud, conspiracy and racketeering and could receive more than 200 years in prison if convicted on all counts for her role in the 1987 collapse of North America Savings & Loan in Santa Ana.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sentencing Friday of Janet Faye McKinzie to a 20-year prison term for her role in the collapse of North America Savings & Loan brought wide praise from thrift regulators and law enforcement authorities. McKinzie's sentence, which was coupled with an order to repay $14 million swindled from the now-defunct Santa Ana thrift, is one of the stiffest penalties in the nation for anyone charged with thrift fraud.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet Faye McKinzie, a high school dropout with a penchant for Rolls-Royces and $1,000 cocktail dresses, was sentenced to 20 years in prison Friday and ordered to pay $13.5 million in restitution for her role in looting the now-defunct North America Savings & Loan of Santa Ana. U.S. District Judge Alicemarie H.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet Faye McKinzie--convicted last March of looting the now-defunct North America Savings & Loan in Santa Ana--would receive a 20-year prison sentence and be forced to pay more than $18 million in restitution and fines if the federal government gets its way. On Friday, Assistant U.S. Atty. Paul L.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet Faye McKinzie was convicted Thursday of looting the now-defunct North America Savings & Loan, ending what had once been a fairy tale existence of Rolls-Royces, $1,000 cocktail dresses and lavish parties with entertainment provided by the likes of Sammy Davis Jr. A jury of six men and six women deliberated eight days in U.S.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet Faye McKinzie was convicted Thursday of looting the now-defunct North America Savings & Loan, forever ending what had once been a fairy tale existence of Rolls Royces, $1,000 cocktail dresses and lavish parties with the likes of Sammy Davis Jr. as entertainment. A jury of six men and six women deliberated eight days in U.S.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Monday ruled that Janet Faye McKinzie can call medical experts in her criminal trial to support her contention that the late owner of North America Savings & Loan plied her with drugs to help him manipulate a massive fraud on the Santa Ana thrift. U.S. District Court Judge Alicemarie H. Stotler said McKinzie can try to prove that her mental capacity in regard to racketeering, conspiracy and other crimes was diminished by constant drug use.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1990
A federal judge here has granted a motion by federal prosecutors to forgo a second trial to see if convicted thrift consultant Janet Faye McKinzie must relinquish millions of dollars in assets. McKinzie was convicted last month of looting the now-defunct North America Savings & Loan in Santa Ana. She was the beneficiary of a $10-million life insurance policy held by the thrift's chairman, Duayne D.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dead man did it. So concluded defense attorney Richard (Racehorse) Haynes during closing arguments Thursday in the seven-week trial of Janet Faye McKinzie, who is accused of looting North America Savings & Loan in Santa Ana with the help of the thrift's president, Duayne D. Christensen. Haynes told jurors in U.S.
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