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Janet Fitch

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012
Panel: Fiction — Family Ties When: 1:30 p.m. Saturday Where: Andrus Gerontology Center on the USC campus Who: Janet Fitch, Julie Otsuka, Christopher Tilghman, moderated by John Freeman
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
"For us, as writers, this is what we do: Use our voices. We want to be heard," says Kelly Rudnicki. She expects to get her masters in professional writing from USC in the spring of 2015 -- and if all goes as planned, she'll be one of the program's last graduates.  However, students and alumni are trying to disrupt the plan. Faculty members and students learned last fall that the MPW program will be shuttered by 2016. Now students are rallying a letter-writing campaign appealing to Steve Kay, dean of USC's Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, hoping to keep the  MPW alive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Janet Fitch's first novel, "White Oleander," hit big when it was picked by Oprah for her book club. Before that happened, she was just another aspiring writer in this big city. She sat down with me at the L.A. Times Festival of Books and talked about who she used to come to see. Sometimes, when she couldn't get tickets to see an author, she'd sit on the grass and watch readers and writers pass by. Once, when her own writing wasn't going well, she couldn't bear to attend. That time passed -- she published "Paint It Black" in 2006 and is now hard at work on a new, very different novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Janet Fitch's first novel, "White Oleander," hit big when it was picked by Oprah for her book club. Before that happened, she was just another aspiring writer in this big city. She sat down with me at the L.A. Times Festival of Books and talked about who she used to come to see. Sometimes, when she couldn't get tickets to see an author, she'd sit on the grass and watch readers and writers pass by. Once, when her own writing wasn't going well, she couldn't bear to attend. That time passed -- she published "Paint It Black" in 2006 and is now hard at work on a new, very different novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2006 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
WHILE Janet Fitch worked on the follow-up to her multimillion-selling debut novel and Oprah's Book Club pick "White Oleander," she listened to a particular cassette over and over again. It was a mix tape of what she called "the saddest songs in the world," full of morose folk musings by Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell. But the saddest song of them all, she said, was Janis Joplin's take on Gershwin's "Summertime."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
"For us, as writers, this is what we do: Use our voices. We want to be heard," says Kelly Rudnicki. She expects to get her masters in professional writing from USC in the spring of 2015 -- and if all goes as planned, she'll be one of the program's last graduates.  However, students and alumni are trying to disrupt the plan. Faculty members and students learned last fall that the MPW program will be shuttered by 2016. Now students are rallying a letter-writing campaign appealing to Steve Kay, dean of USC's Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, hoping to keep the  MPW alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The program schedule for the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books was released Monday morning. The schedule, which is online, includes the complete list of author appearances and special events during the Festival of Books, April 20-21, on the campus of USC. More than 400 writers are to appear at the festival, and 150,000 people are expected to attend. There are to be panel discussions with authors, poetry readings, book signings and celebrity appearances. Did you know Debbie Reynolds is publishing a memoir?
FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Janet Fitch, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's become a tradition at the L.A. Times Food section: Every year, we run a holiday essay by a noted Southern California writer reflecting the unique nature of the way we celebrate the season. This year's is by Janet Fitch, whose novels include the best-selling "White Oleander" and "Paint It Black. " We won't be coming home for the holidays this year. My mother no longer lives in our rambling old Wilshire Park home. She moved out in July. She and my father bought the place in 1961, an old house even then, an old-fashioned place with a dining room and a library and closets you could walk into, a million hiding places, even a tiny door for my imaginary friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2002 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Janet Fitch is trying to slink back into the Writer's Life -- working unnoticed on her novel in a downtown Los Angeles studio, grabbing meals out of a can -- the life she had before her bestselling book, "White Oleander," was turned into a feature film. The movie, starring Michelle Pfeiffer and directed by Peter Kosminsky, is one of several upcoming big-screen adaptations of literary fiction that have the potential to introduce vast audiences to writers who are known in relatively small circles.
BOOKS
September 17, 2006 | Nina Revoyr, Nina Revoyr is the author of the novels "The Necessary Hunger" and "Southland."
HAVING a novel become a literary sensation -- as Janet Fitch did seven years ago with "White Oleander" -- can be a mixed blessing. On the one hand, it's hard to argue with widespread critical praise, being selected for Oprah's Book Club, selling more than 3 million copies and seeing the book made into a successful film. On the other, what can you possibly do as a follow-up?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The program schedule for the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books was released Monday morning. The schedule, which is online, includes the complete list of author appearances and special events during the Festival of Books, April 20-21, on the campus of USC. More than 400 writers are to appear at the festival, and 150,000 people are expected to attend. There are to be panel discussions with authors, poetry readings, book signings and celebrity appearances. Did you know Debbie Reynolds is publishing a memoir?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012
Panel: Fiction — Family Ties When: 1:30 p.m. Saturday Where: Andrus Gerontology Center on the USC campus Who: Janet Fitch, Julie Otsuka, Christopher Tilghman, moderated by John Freeman
FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Janet Fitch, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's become a tradition at the L.A. Times Food section: Every year, we run a holiday essay by a noted Southern California writer reflecting the unique nature of the way we celebrate the season. This year's is by Janet Fitch, whose novels include the best-selling "White Oleander" and "Paint It Black. " We won't be coming home for the holidays this year. My mother no longer lives in our rambling old Wilshire Park home. She moved out in July. She and my father bought the place in 1961, an old house even then, an old-fashioned place with a dining room and a library and closets you could walk into, a million hiding places, even a tiny door for my imaginary friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2006 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
WHILE Janet Fitch worked on the follow-up to her multimillion-selling debut novel and Oprah's Book Club pick "White Oleander," she listened to a particular cassette over and over again. It was a mix tape of what she called "the saddest songs in the world," full of morose folk musings by Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell. But the saddest song of them all, she said, was Janis Joplin's take on Gershwin's "Summertime."
BOOKS
September 17, 2006 | Nina Revoyr, Nina Revoyr is the author of the novels "The Necessary Hunger" and "Southland."
HAVING a novel become a literary sensation -- as Janet Fitch did seven years ago with "White Oleander" -- can be a mixed blessing. On the one hand, it's hard to argue with widespread critical praise, being selected for Oprah's Book Club, selling more than 3 million copies and seeing the book made into a successful film. On the other, what can you possibly do as a follow-up?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2002 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Janet Fitch is trying to slink back into the Writer's Life -- working unnoticed on her novel in a downtown Los Angeles studio, grabbing meals out of a can -- the life she had before her bestselling book, "White Oleander," was turned into a feature film. The movie, starring Michelle Pfeiffer and directed by Peter Kosminsky, is one of several upcoming big-screen adaptations of literary fiction that have the potential to introduce vast audiences to writers who are known in relatively small circles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2008 | Scott Timberg
Playwright and poet Brighde Mullins will become director of the University of Southern California Master of Professional Writing program, starting July 1. The organizer of reading series at REDCAT, LACMA and New York's Dia Art Foundation, Mullins directs a writing program at the California Institute of the Arts. Her plays include "Fire Eater," performed at Venice's Electric Lodge in 2004. The faculty for the USC program includes writers Janet Fitch, Judith Freeman and Sandra Tsing Loh. -- Scott Timberg
MAGAZINE
April 15, 2007
Janet Fitch hit a home run ("In Sights," Home Design Issue, March 18). Most of us live our somnambulist lives, never bothering to really see who and what is around us. But if we could, I believe we would be the better for it. Fitch's essay forces us to examine where we fit and to be more fully engaged in who we are. Marco A. Fierro Phoenix
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