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Janet Hadda

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March 6, 1988 | Diane Kovacs, Kovacs is a marriage, family and child counselor in private practice in Santa Monica. and
As in life, literary characters sometimes have been emotionally or physically abandoned by a parent, suffering an inconsolable loss. As in life, they have sometimes committed suicide. As in life, the suicide of a fictional character "is the culmination of a life gone awry," Janet Hadda says in her post-Freudian psychoanalytic study of suicide in Yiddish literature.
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April 30, 1997 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Isaac Bashevis Singer: A Life," by Janet Hadda, opens with an endearing reminiscence of the author's heroic effort to search out the real man behind the celebrated (and calculated) public image of the beloved Yiddish storyteller.
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April 3, 1988
I was surprised that the review of Janet Hadda's book, "Passionate Women, Passive Men, Suicide in Yiddish Literature" (Book Review, March 6), omitted a vital piece of information about the author. Hadda, in addition to being an associate professor of Yiddish at UCLA, is also a respected psychoanalyst. LEBA BEIERS LOS ANGELES
BOOKS
April 3, 1988
I was surprised that the review of Janet Hadda's book, "Passionate Women, Passive Men, Suicide in Yiddish Literature" (Book Review, March 6), omitted a vital piece of information about the author. Hadda, in addition to being an associate professor of Yiddish at UCLA, is also a respected psychoanalyst. LEBA BEIERS LOS ANGELES
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Isaac Bashevis Singer: A Life," by Janet Hadda, opens with an endearing reminiscence of the author's heroic effort to search out the real man behind the celebrated (and calculated) public image of the beloved Yiddish storyteller.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1997 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Ellroy, the master of hard-boiled crime novels, will be at the Ventura Bookstore at 7 tonight to read from and sign "My Dark Places," an account of his mother's slaying, and to discuss his novel "L.A. Confidential," now a movie playing in local theaters. The bookstore, owned and managed by Ed Elrod and Kent Weigel for 19 years, opened its doors 59 years ago in downtown Ventura as Blendine Nickel's Bookshop and Lending Library.
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November 2, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Alamitos suspense author Martin J. Smith says he's throwing away his alarm clock and switching to decaf coffee. For three years, Smith has been rising at 4 a.m. to work a couple of hours on his novels before heading to Newport Beach for his job as editor of Orange Coast magazine. But Smith, whose first novel, "Time Release," was published in March, has announced his intention to step down as editor in December after 3 1/2 years with the 38,000-circulation monthly magazine.
BOOKS
March 6, 1988 | Diane Kovacs, Kovacs is a marriage, family and child counselor in private practice in Santa Monica. and
As in life, literary characters sometimes have been emotionally or physically abandoned by a parent, suffering an inconsolable loss. As in life, they have sometimes committed suicide. As in life, the suicide of a fictional character "is the culmination of a life gone awry," Janet Hadda says in her post-Freudian psychoanalytic study of suicide in Yiddish literature.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stuart Markowitz and Ann Kelsey of "L.A. Law" share at least one thing with Michael and Hope Steadman of "thirtysomething": The television couples live with the consequences of marriage between Jews and non-Jews. The highly visible characters reflect the fact that off the TV screen, Jews are wedding non-Jews in record numbers.
BOOKS
November 5, 2006 | Jeffrey Meyers, Jeffrey Meyers has published 20 biographies, most recently "Modigliani: A Life." He is at work on a biography of Samuel Johnson.
ISAAC SINGER'S fiction is, like Hawthorne's, gothic and grotesque; like Gogol's, fantastic and satiric; like Dostoevsky's, feverish and horrific. His dominant themes are the conflict with evil, the search for God, the vital connection between demonic possession and creative power, the attraction of the mystical, the pull of the perverse and the slavish pleasures of sex. Singer wrote in Yiddish, a Germanic language written in Hebrew letters and read from right to left.
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