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Janet L Norwood

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NEWS
October 30, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Janet L. Norwood, veteran U.S. commissioner of labor statistics, decried Washington's lack of leadership on economic problems Tuesday, saying that the country is being polarized by the growth of the most severe gap between the poorest and richest Americans that she has seen in 38 years of government service.
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NEWS
October 30, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Janet L. Norwood, veteran U.S. commissioner of labor statistics, decried Washington's lack of leadership on economic problems Tuesday, saying that the country is being polarized by the growth of the most severe gap between the poorest and richest Americans that she has seen in 38 years of government service.
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NEWS
April 4, 1992 | Associated Press
President Bush has announced that he plans to nominate Marvin H. Kosters of Arlington, Va., an economist who worked in the Gerald R. Ford White House, to be commissioner of labor statistics at the Labor Department. If confirmed by the Senate, Kosters would succeed Janet L. Norwood.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | Washington Post
Janet L. Norwood, who has served as commissioner of labor statistics since 1979, will leave her post to join the Urban Institute at the end of this year. A spokeswoman at the Bureau of Labor Statistics said Norwood is leaving government to speak and write on labor market issues from the private sector.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1987
President Reagan said he intends to nominate Edward H. Fleischman for another term as a member of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Fleischman has been a commissioner since 1985. Reagan said he also will nominate Janet L. Norwood for reappointment to a four-year term as commissioner of labor statistics, a post she has held since 1979.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The Bureau of Labor Statistics announced Tuesday in Washington that the rate of workplace injuries and illnesses increased 5% from 1986 to 1987. The rate increased to 8.3 injuries and illnesses per 100 workers from 7.9 per 100 workers. The total number of injuries and illnesses in 1987 was 6.03 million, up from 5.63 million in 1986, the bureau said. Janet L. Norwood, commissioner of labor statistics, said the increase was mainly in mining, manufacturing, transportation and public utilities.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Unemployment edged up slightly to 5.4% last month but unusually robust January growth created 408,000 new payroll jobs and the number of working-age Americans holding jobs reached a record high, the government reported today. The Labor Department said the unemployment rate rose by 0.1 of a percentage point from the December rate of 5.3%.
NEWS
July 5, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Unemployment remained 7.3% in June for the fifth consecutive month, the Labor Department reported today, the longest period the jobless rate has remained at the same level in more than 15 years. (Joblessness in the Los Angeles area jumped to 7.7% from May's 7%, while California's rate spurted the same amount, to 7.8% from 7.1%.) Nationwide, the service sector continued to add employment in June with 85,000 new jobs. But total employment, which had hit a record 106.96 million in May, fell to 106.
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Unemployment fell slightly to 6.6% in March--the lowest rate in seven years--as a decline in the nation's labor force more than made up for a slowing in the rate of new job creation, the government said today. The White House proclaimed that "the march of economic progress continues," but private economists saw nothing but bad omens in today's report. The economists pointed out that the new jobs were in service-producing industries rather than the goods-producing part of the economy.
NEWS
October 12, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--After 110 years, Washington's Cosmos Club is about to welcome its first women members, with actress Helen Hayes and Labor Secretary Ann Dore McLaughlin among the first to join, club President Tedson Meyers announced. After years of legal challenges, the club said in June that it would change its all-male membership policy. Two days later, the Supreme Court upheld a New York City law forcing clubs dealing in business matters to admit women and minorities.
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