Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJanet L Yellen
IN THE NEWS

Janet L Yellen

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 9, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet L. Yellen, the soft-spoken academic who heads the White House Council of Economic Advisors, is resigning for personal reasons and will return to the faculty of UC Berkeley, administration officials confirmed Tuesday. Her likely successor is Martin N. Baily, an expert on productivity who has served on the economic council, according to the White House. Yellen's exit represents the third departure of a major economic policymaker in just the last few weeks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 20, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - In its last workday of the year, the Democratic-controlled Senate overcame GOP objections Friday to confirm two high-profile Obama nominees to the Department of Homeland Security and the Internal Revenue Service, but put off final approval of Federal Reserve chairwoman candidate Janet L. Yellen until January as part of a late-night cease-fire so lawmakers could adjourn for the holiday recess. After heated debate, the Senate narrowly approved Alejandro Mayorkas, President Obama's controversial pick for the No. 2 job at Homeland Security, in a 54-41 vote.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pressing on with the delicate business of naming his Cabinet, President Clinton today is expected to nominate White House aide Alexis Herman to serve as Labor secretary and appoint Janet L. Yellen, a member of the Federal Reserve Board and a former UC Berkeley professor, as chairwoman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, sources said late Thursday.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee
WASHINGTON - Now that the Federal Reserve has started to ease a key economic stimulus, the reins of managing monetary policy to finish the job soon will be turned over to Janet L. Yellen, the central bank's vice chair. She won't find it easy. Yellen, expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Saturday as the Fed's first female chief, will be leading a very different and potentially more fractious policymaking team at the central bank. A more divisive group could be particularly nettlesome as she tries to execute the complicated exit from the Fed's unprecedented actions to stimulate the economy after the Great Recession.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
Janet Yellen, a UC Berkeley economist, won Senate confirmation Thursday for a seat on the Federal Reserve Board, becoming President Clinton's second appointee to the powerful central bank policy panel. The Senate cleared Yellen's nomination on a 94-6 vote just in time for her to join the Fed's Open Market Committee meeting Tuesday, where the central bank may raise interest rates to combat inflation. She will sit on both the Fed's board and the policy-making Open Market Committee.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton filled two vacancies on the Federal Reserve Board Friday, appointing White House economist Alan Blinder as vice chairman and UC Berkeley economist Janet Yellen to a second seat on the Fed's seven-member board of governors. Blinder and Yellen would be the first Democratic appointees to the board since 1980.
NEWS
December 21, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday completed the politically sensitive task of picking his Cabinet for the second term with selections that included one surprise--Transportation Secretary Federico Pena was nominated to serve as Energy secretary. In addition, the president named Andrew Cuomo, son of former New York Gov. Mario M.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee
WASHINGTON - Two momentous decisions involving the Federal Reserve are coming to a head, with significant implications for the U.S. and global economies. Janet L. Yellen, a former UC Berkeley economist, stands in the middle of both of them. As vice chair of the central bank, Yellen will take a leading role next week, when policymakers decide whether to start rolling back the Fed's massive monetary stimulus after several years of providing extraordinary support for the weak economy.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee
WASHINGTON - Now that the Federal Reserve has started to ease a key economic stimulus, the reins of managing monetary policy to finish the job soon will be turned over to Janet L. Yellen, the central bank's vice chair. She won't find it easy. Yellen, expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Saturday as the Fed's first female chief, will be leading a very different and potentially more fractious policymaking team at the central bank. A more divisive group could be particularly nettlesome as she tries to execute the complicated exit from the Fed's unprecedented actions to stimulate the economy after the Great Recession.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1994 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton is expected to pick Janet L. Yellen, a soft-spoken, UC Berkeley economist whose interests range from the behavior of youth gangs to labor markets, to fill one of two vacancies on the Federal Reserve Board. Her nomination could come by the end of next week, sources said Thursday. Yellen was traveling in Connecticut and could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2013 | By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - With political opposition mounting against him, former Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers pulled his name from consideration as the next chairman of the Federal Reserve, an abrupt turn of events that underscored President Obama's weakness in Congress. The unexpected decision, disclosed Sunday, left some financial analysts recalibrating the odds of changes in the central bank's policies, which have major global implications. Economists and other experts were stunned.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee
WASHINGTON - Two momentous decisions involving the Federal Reserve are coming to a head, with significant implications for the U.S. and global economies. Janet L. Yellen, a former UC Berkeley economist, stands in the middle of both of them. As vice chair of the central bank, Yellen will take a leading role next week, when policymakers decide whether to start rolling back the Fed's massive monetary stimulus after several years of providing extraordinary support for the weak economy.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - President Obama praised Lawrence H. Summers and Janet L. Yellen as "highly qualified" to be the next Federal Reserve chief, but said he had a "range of outstanding candidates" and reiterated that he would not make a decision until the fall. In a news conference Friday, Obama also suggested that his recent defense of Summers, a former Treasury secretary and his onetime chief economic advisor, should not be construed as Summers somehow having an inside track on the job. Yellen is the Fed's current vice chair.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama's choice for replacing Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke probably comes down to a quiet consensus builder, who would be a historic pick, or one considered brilliant but difficult to work with. Through unprecedented policy moves and public outreach, Bernanke has dramatically expanded the role and the profile of the nation's central bank. But neither he nor the White House have indicated whether he would seek a third term or be renominated. It is widely expected, though, that Bernanke will step down when his current term expires in January.
BOOKS
February 1, 2004 | Peter G. Gosselin, Peter G. Gosselin is a Times national economics correspondent based in Washington, D.C.
At any given time, there is a dominant line of argument about the great issues that face America. When it comes to the economy, that line is most often delivered by Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet L. Yellen, the soft-spoken academic who heads the White House Council of Economic Advisors, is resigning for personal reasons and will return to the faculty of UC Berkeley, administration officials confirmed Tuesday. Her likely successor is Martin N. Baily, an expert on productivity who has served on the economic council, according to the White House. Yellen's exit represents the third departure of a major economic policymaker in just the last few weeks.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - President Obama praised Lawrence H. Summers and Janet L. Yellen as "highly qualified" to be the next Federal Reserve chief, but said he had a "range of outstanding candidates" and reiterated that he would not make a decision until the fall. In a news conference Friday, Obama also suggested that his recent defense of Summers, a former Treasury secretary and his onetime chief economic advisor, should not be construed as Summers somehow having an inside track on the job. Yellen is the Fed's current vice chair.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - In its last workday of the year, the Democratic-controlled Senate overcame GOP objections Friday to confirm two high-profile Obama nominees to the Department of Homeland Security and the Internal Revenue Service, but put off final approval of Federal Reserve chairwoman candidate Janet L. Yellen until January as part of a late-night cease-fire so lawmakers could adjourn for the holiday recess. After heated debate, the Senate narrowly approved Alejandro Mayorkas, President Obama's controversial pick for the No. 2 job at Homeland Security, in a 54-41 vote.
NEWS
December 21, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday completed the politically sensitive task of picking his Cabinet for the second term with selections that included one surprise--Transportation Secretary Federico Pena was nominated to serve as Energy secretary. In addition, the president named Andrew Cuomo, son of former New York Gov. Mario M.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pressing on with the delicate business of naming his Cabinet, President Clinton today is expected to nominate White House aide Alexis Herman to serve as Labor secretary and appoint Janet L. Yellen, a member of the Federal Reserve Board and a former UC Berkeley professor, as chairwoman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, sources said late Thursday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|