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BUSINESS
October 24, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The one-time Beverly Hills-area home of actress Janet Leigh is on the market at $3.75 million. Built in 1976, the modern traditional-style home is set on a promontory of more than half an acre with a swimming pool and tennis court. The 4,432-square-foot ocean-view house features high ceilings, four bedrooms and five bathrooms. Leigh, who died in 2004 at age 77, starred in "Touch of Evil" (1958) and "The Manchurian Candidate" (1962) but is perhaps best remembered in film for her murder in the shower scene of "Psycho" (1960)
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NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Susan Denley
Scarlett Johannson channels Janet Leigh in the shower scene from "Psycho" on the cover of V magazine this month, where she's dripping wet, wrapped in a shower curtain, mouth twisted into a scream -- or maybe it's a laugh. [V Magazine] Nordstrom is planning to showcase designs by the 10 finalists in the CFDA/Voge Fashion Fund competition in five pop-up shops around the country February to May. One is slated to be at the Grove in Los Angeles. Others will be in Seattle, San Francisco, Dallas and Chicago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2004
Any film buff or Hitchcock fan could have told you that the headline in your obituary of Janet Leigh [by Myrna Oliver, Oct. 5], claiming that "Memorable Shower Scene in 'Psycho' Established Her as a Major Star," was misleading and missed the point behind her participation in that classic movie. If Leigh hadn't already been an "established" star, Hitch never would have cast her as the ill-fated Marion Crane. The director's whole idea behind an actress of Leigh's stature playing Marion was so that audiences would be shocked by her sudden demise so early in the picture.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The one-time Beverly Hills-area home of actress Janet Leigh is on the market at $3.75 million. Built in 1976, the modern traditional-style home is set on a promontory of more than half an acre with a swimming pool and tennis court. The 4,432-square-foot ocean-view house features high ceilings, four bedrooms and five bathrooms. Leigh, who died in 2004 at age 77, starred in "Touch of Evil" (1958) and "The Manchurian Candidate" (1962) but is perhaps best remembered in film for her murder in the shower scene of "Psycho" (1960)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Janet Leigh, Hollywood's perfect "nice girl" ingenue who memorably changed her acting image and earned an Academy Award nomination with her bloodcurdling screams as she was stabbed to death in Alfred Hitchcock's classic "Psycho," has died. She was 77. Leigh, who appeared in more than 60 motion pictures, died Sunday in her Beverly Hills home of vasculitis, an inflammation of the blood vessels.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | ANN CONWAY
The photograph on her "Psycho" book jacket is enough to stop you dead. There she is, beautiful Janet Leigh, fish-eyed, her nose smashed against the base of a bathtub. "That's after she was stabbed to death--when she has fallen in the shower," Leigh said of Marion Crane, the young woman she portrayed in "Psycho," the 35-year-old thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock.
NEWS
June 19, 1995 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I always thought that the New Yorker's Lillian Ross set the standard for movie journalism with "Picture," her fly-on-the-wall look at the making of "The Red Badge of Courage." Then, years later, ex-New York Times Hollywood reporter Aljean Harmetz figured out how to retrospectively watch a movie being made with "The Making of the Wizard of Oz."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Janet Leigh made 63 movies in 53 years -- three of them classics. From 1958 to 1962, she had a sort of dark trilogy, playing an icy, unsettling and alienated woman, a cynically tragic ur-feminist. She always seemed wounded. As an imperiled wife in "Touch of Evil," she sported a coat over her broken arm. As a stranger on a train in "The Manchurian Candidate," whose three-minute pickup of Frank Sinatra's Maj. Marco was so packed with unsettling non sequiturs -- "Are you Arabic?
MAGAZINE
September 19, 1999 | Mark Ehrman
HYPED AS: "A Hollywood Frame of Mind," an art opening/fund-raiser at "respected celebrity hairstylist" Tina Cassaday's Beverly Hills salon. * REALITY: Double-hosted by Hitchcock leading ladies Janet Leigh and Tippi Hedren ("Psycho" and "The Birds," respectively), the event presents 17 oil paintings of film stars for sale and auctions off donated movie packages to raise money for Hedren's Shambala animal preserve and the Leigh-backed Motion Picture Television Fund.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2010 | By Susan Kandel
Gleaming white tiles; pounding jets of water; a naked woman; a shadowy figure on the other side of the plastic curtain; is there anyone out there who doesn't know what happens next? If not the most famous scene in the history of the cinema, the shower sequence in "Psycho," Alfred Hitchcock's black-and-white masterwork of 1960, is certainly the most imitated and parodied. Though Norman Bates dispatches with the hapless Marion Crane in less than a minute, shooting the scene took seven days, 78 camera setups, the eleventh-hour addition of Bernard Herrmann's shrieking score for strings, several yards of flesh-colored moleskin, an actress, a stand-in and a body double -- the last of which is the putative subject of Robert Graysmith's ultimately baffling "The Girl in Alfred Hitchcock's Shower."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2004
Any film buff or Hitchcock fan could have told you that the headline in your obituary of Janet Leigh [by Myrna Oliver, Oct. 5], claiming that "Memorable Shower Scene in 'Psycho' Established Her as a Major Star," was misleading and missed the point behind her participation in that classic movie. If Leigh hadn't already been an "established" star, Hitch never would have cast her as the ill-fated Marion Crane. The director's whole idea behind an actress of Leigh's stature playing Marion was so that audiences would be shocked by her sudden demise so early in the picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Janet Leigh made 63 movies in 53 years -- three of them classics. From 1958 to 1962, she had a sort of dark trilogy, playing an icy, unsettling and alienated woman, a cynically tragic ur-feminist. She always seemed wounded. As an imperiled wife in "Touch of Evil," she sported a coat over her broken arm. As a stranger on a train in "The Manchurian Candidate," whose three-minute pickup of Frank Sinatra's Maj. Marco was so packed with unsettling non sequiturs -- "Are you Arabic?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Janet Leigh, Hollywood's perfect "nice girl" ingenue who memorably changed her acting image and earned an Academy Award nomination with her bloodcurdling screams as she was stabbed to death in Alfred Hitchcock's classic "Psycho," has died. She was 77. Leigh, who appeared in more than 60 motion pictures, died Sunday in her Beverly Hills home of vasculitis, an inflammation of the blood vessels.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eva Marie Saint, Tippi Hedren and Janet Leigh all worked with director Alfred Hitchcock. And each one of the blond actresses had a different experience with the master of suspense. "I am always fascinated when I am with someone who has also worked with Hitch," says Saint, who played a sultry spy opposite Cary Grant in the 1959 Hitchcock thriller "North by Northwest." "We tell our stories and I sit there fascinated by what we're saying.
MAGAZINE
September 19, 1999 | Mark Ehrman
HYPED AS: "A Hollywood Frame of Mind," an art opening/fund-raiser at "respected celebrity hairstylist" Tina Cassaday's Beverly Hills salon. * REALITY: Double-hosted by Hitchcock leading ladies Janet Leigh and Tippi Hedren ("Psycho" and "The Birds," respectively), the event presents 17 oil paintings of film stars for sale and auctions off donated movie packages to raise money for Hedren's Shambala animal preserve and the Leigh-backed Motion Picture Television Fund.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Susan Denley
Scarlett Johannson channels Janet Leigh in the shower scene from "Psycho" on the cover of V magazine this month, where she's dripping wet, wrapped in a shower curtain, mouth twisted into a scream -- or maybe it's a laugh. [V Magazine] Nordstrom is planning to showcase designs by the 10 finalists in the CFDA/Voge Fashion Fund competition in five pop-up shops around the country February to May. One is slated to be at the Grove in Los Angeles. Others will be in Seattle, San Francisco, Dallas and Chicago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The remake of Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 black-and-white horror classic "Psycho" has been shrouded in secrecy. Ever since Universal Pictures and Imagine Entertainment announced in March that Gus Van Sant would direct a modern version in color, film buffs have hungered for details, mostly in vain. That's why Jeffrey Kitchen's screenwriting seminar last Friday night at a West Hollywood hotel was such a treat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1998 | STEVE HARVEY
The remake of "Psycho" doesn't really stir memories for me. I saw the original in 1960--that is, I attended the original--but didn't notice much because I had my eyes closed virtually from beginning to end. So it came as a surprise when Jerome Kleinsasser of Bakersfield wrote to point out that in the original film's opening minutes, when the Janet Leigh character is fleeing Phoenix with someone else's money, she comes to a fork in the road. A sign says Bakersfield is in one direction, L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The remake of Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 black-and-white horror classic "Psycho" has been shrouded in secrecy. Ever since Universal Pictures and Imagine Entertainment announced in March that Gus Van Sant would direct a modern version in color, film buffs have hungered for details, mostly in vain. That's why Jeffrey Kitchen's screenwriting seminar last Friday night at a West Hollywood hotel was such a treat.
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