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December 20, 1999 | CLIFF ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're British, you know Janet McTeer as a working actress. If you're a New Yorker, you know McTeer as the star who lit up Broadway--and won a Tony--two years ago in "A Doll's House." But if you've never heard of her and see her for the first time in the film "Tumbleweeds," you assume she's a thirtysomething actress from the Deep South who is finally getting her break in an independent film--though her acting is so monumental you'd wonder why she hasn't been discovered sooner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The White Queen," a co-production of the BBC and Starz, debuted in Britain this summer to mostly scathing reviews. Critics objected especially to a few glaring anachronisms - no zippers in the 15th century, nor tourist-friendly castle handrails - and a general lack of the slop-pots-'n'-rotten-teeth realism that has marked period dramas ever since HBO's "John Adams" showcased the horror of early smallpox vaccines. There was, however, the feeling that the Americans might like it better.
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NEWS
June 24, 2004 | Judy Chia Hui Hsu, Times Staff Writer
Janet McTEER won a Tony Award for playing Ibsen's Nora and was Oscar-nominated for her turn as a single mother in "Tumbleweeds." Actresses have built substantial Hollywood careers from less. Yet the British actress insists it was her choice, not circumstance, that explains her follow-up roles. These have included a supporting part in "Waking the Dead," the narrator of Todd Haynes' "Velvet Goldmine" and the lead in the well-received independent film "Songcatcher."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
On a cold and dreary November afternoon, the cozy lobby of the Chateau Marmont calls to mind Dublin's once historic Morrison's Hotel, where Albert Nobbs, the title character in the new gender-bending drama starring Glenn Close, works as a waiter. Clad in black, Close and her costar Janet McTeer sit side by side in armchairs, digging into identical tuna salads and pots of English Breakfast tea — both equally exhilarated, if exhausted. For Close, the film's Friday opening, a one-week theatrical run that precedes a wider January release, represents the culmination of a 30-year artistic odyssey, one that last week netted both actresses nominations for Golden Globe and SAG awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The White Queen," a co-production of the BBC and Starz, debuted in Britain this summer to mostly scathing reviews. Critics objected especially to a few glaring anachronisms - no zippers in the 15th century, nor tourist-friendly castle handrails - and a general lack of the slop-pots-'n'-rotten-teeth realism that has marked period dramas ever since HBO's "John Adams" showcased the horror of early smallpox vaccines. There was, however, the feeling that the Americans might like it better.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Tumbleweeds" is one of those wonderful, deeply personal pictures that pop up every now and then to lift your spirits. British actress Janet McTeer, who won a Tony for her Nora in Ibsen's "A Doll's House," persuades you instantly that to the core she is Mary Jo Walker, a working-class native North Carolinian. McTeer is superlative in every way, and her performance ranks among the year's best--but it's in the kind of low-budget film that usually doesn't receive the big, expensive push needed to cop the top annual film awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heralding the arrival of the 1999 movie award season, DreamWorks' dark comedy "American Beauty" was named best film of the year Wednesday by the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures. The board, founded in 1909 and consisting of educators, writers, film historians and film students, also named Russell Crowe best actor for his role as the tobacco whistle-blower in "The Insider," and Janet McTeer best actress for her performance as a colorful divorced mother in "Tumbleweeds."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
On a cold and dreary November afternoon, the cozy lobby of the Chateau Marmont calls to mind Dublin's once historic Morrison's Hotel, where Albert Nobbs, the title character in the new gender-bending drama starring Glenn Close, works as a waiter. Clad in black, Close and her costar Janet McTeer sit side by side in armchairs, digging into identical tuna salads and pots of English Breakfast tea — both equally exhilarated, if exhausted. For Close, the film's Friday opening, a one-week theatrical run that precedes a wider January release, represents the culmination of a 30-year artistic odyssey, one that last week netted both actresses nominations for Golden Globe and SAG awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Maggie the Cat is coming back to Broadway. Ashley Judd will star as Maggie in a revival of Tennessee Williams' "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," opening Nov. 2 at the Music Box Theatre. One of Williams' most popular plays, "Cat" will also star Jason Patric as Brick and Ned Beatty as Big Daddy. The director is Anthony Page, who directed the Tony-winning revival of Ibsen's "A Doll's House," starring Janet McTeer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2009 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Get ready. Tony Soprano on Broadway. James Gandolfini -- from HBO's classic mob series "The Sopranos" -- will star with Jeff Daniels, Hope Davis and Marcia Gay Harden in "God of Carnage," Yasmina Reza's four-character play about the clash between liberal, middle-class couples. The play opens March 22 at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre in New York. "God of Carnage" was a hit last year in London with a cast that included Ralph Fiennes and Janet McTeer. The director is Matthew Warchus, who also directed Reza's comedy "Art" in London and New York.
NEWS
June 24, 2004 | Judy Chia Hui Hsu, Times Staff Writer
Janet McTEER won a Tony Award for playing Ibsen's Nora and was Oscar-nominated for her turn as a single mother in "Tumbleweeds." Actresses have built substantial Hollywood careers from less. Yet the British actress insists it was her choice, not circumstance, that explains her follow-up roles. These have included a supporting part in "Waking the Dead," the narrator of Todd Haynes' "Velvet Goldmine" and the lead in the well-received independent film "Songcatcher."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1999 | CLIFF ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're British, you know Janet McTeer as a working actress. If you're a New Yorker, you know McTeer as the star who lit up Broadway--and won a Tony--two years ago in "A Doll's House." But if you've never heard of her and see her for the first time in the film "Tumbleweeds," you assume she's a thirtysomething actress from the Deep South who is finally getting her break in an independent film--though her acting is so monumental you'd wonder why she hasn't been discovered sooner.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heralding the arrival of the 1999 movie award season, DreamWorks' dark comedy "American Beauty" was named best film of the year Wednesday by the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures. The board, founded in 1909 and consisting of educators, writers, film historians and film students, also named Russell Crowe best actor for his role as the tobacco whistle-blower in "The Insider," and Janet McTeer best actress for her performance as a colorful divorced mother in "Tumbleweeds."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Tumbleweeds" is one of those wonderful, deeply personal pictures that pop up every now and then to lift your spirits. British actress Janet McTeer, who won a Tony for her Nora in Ibsen's "A Doll's House," persuades you instantly that to the core she is Mary Jo Walker, a working-class native North Carolinian. McTeer is superlative in every way, and her performance ranks among the year's best--but it's in the kind of low-budget film that usually doesn't receive the big, expensive push needed to cop the top annual film awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2000
Motion picture--drama: "American Beauty" Motion picture--musical or comedy: "Toy Story 2" Director: Sam Mendes, "American Beauty" Screenplay: Alan Ball, "American Beauty" Actress--drama: Hilary Swank, "Boys Don't Cry" Actor--drama: Denzel Washington, "The Hurricane" Actress--musical or comedy: Janet McTeer, "Tumbleweeds" Actor--musical or comedy: Jim Carrey, "Man on the Moon" Supporting actress: Angelina Jolie, "Girl, Interrupted" Supporting actor: Tom Cruise, "Magnolia" Original score: Ennio
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1997 | Associated Press
"Stanley" dominated the Laurence Olivier awards here Sunday, boosting its Broadway opening later this week with honors for best new play, best actor, best supporting actress and best set design. The play, by Pam Gems, is based on the life of the English painter Sir Stanley Spencer (1891-1959). Best actor Antony Sher and best supporting actress Deborah Findlay will repeat their roles on Broadway. The set design award went to Tim Hatley.
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