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Janet Napolitano

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NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
Janet Napolitano has a message for the next head of the Department of Homeland Security: “You will need a large bottle of Advil.” In a farewell speech Tuesday, Napolitano gave a wide-ranging defense of her 4½f years as head of one of the government's youngest and most unwieldy departments. “Some have said that being the secretary of DHS is the most thankless job in Washington,” Napolitano said at the National Press Club in the capital. “That's not true. No doubt it is a very big and complex job. It is literally a 24/7 job,” she said.
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NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The former top watchdog for the Homeland Security Department rewrote reports and slowed investigations at the request of senior staff for then-Secretary Janet Napolitano, a review conducted by Senate staff found. Charles K. Edwards, who was acting inspector general for Homeland Security from late 2011 through early 2013, considered aides to Napolitano to be friends, socialized with them over drinks and dinner and, at their urging, improperly made changes to several investigative reports, according to the Senate review released Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The surprise selection of former U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano to head the UC system has fueled criticism over the secret selection process. Supporters of a more open method say that better decisions are made when three or four finalists for a university presidency or chancellorship are formally identified to the public. At that point, faculty and students could have a chance to meet them before a final selection. Though widely praised, the selection of Napolitano in July also came as a shock to many outside a relatively small circle of UC regents and other officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
The University of California on Monday announced the formation of an advisory group to help military veterans address specific issues and succeed in earning degrees. The announcement by UC president Janet Napolitano came after she met Friday with military veteran representatives who are enrolled at each of the system's 10 campuses and will form the initial membership of the new panel. Financial aid, campus life and housing are among the topics the advisory group will tackle and make recommendations about to Napolitano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The nomination of Janet Napolitano, the U.S. secretary of Homeland Security, to be the next president of the University of California signals a desire for change at the sprawling 10-campus system and hopes that a highly visible political personality may be able to raise more money and play a more influential role in Sacramento and Washington. Besides being the first woman expected to be named president in UC's 145-year history, Napolitano is thought to be only the second true outsider and the first without any record of helping to run a university.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Ted Rall
Janet Napolitano, the outgoing secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, has been tapped to head the University of California.  ALSO: Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons Jenny McCarthy, dangerous at any volume Rolling Stone nails it with its Dzhokhar Tsarnaev cover Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall    
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Jason Song
The head of an influential union said Friday that she hoped Janet Napolitano, nominated to lead the University of California system, would "restore the spirit of cooperation and respect" to the 10-campus system. Kathryn Lybarger, president of AFSCME 3299, the system's largest union, said that UC staff, students and patients were "largely excluded from the secretive process" that led to the nomination of Napolitano, secretary of Homeland Security. TALK BACK:   Is Janet Napolitano a good choice for UC president?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Larry Gordon and Kimi Yoshino
President Obama on Friday thanked Janet Napolitano for her four years of service as Homeland Security secretary and credited her with helping make the country safer before wishing her well in her new role as president of the University of California system. Napolitano announced Friday morning that she would leave Obama's Cabinet to take the UC post. Obama credited Napolitano with helping secure U.S. borders and "taking steps to make our immigration system fairer and more consistent with our values.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - With a folksy smile and razor-sharp political instincts, Janet Napolitano managed to wrestle the federal government's third largest and arguably most dysfunctional U.S. department into relative shape during her 4 1/2 years as secretary of Homeland Security. She thus gives up one vast but troubled empire for another when she leaves Washington to take over as president of the University of California system in September. As head of a department cobbled together from 22 disparate agencies and departments after the Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2013 | Jason Song
During her six years as Arizona governor, Janet Napolitano, a Democrat, secured a $1-billion bond to build new facilities for the state's universities, signed a law that boosted state contributions to financial aid and approved a special fund to retain professors -- all with a Republican-controlled Legislature. During sensitive negotiations, Napolitano would often excuse aides from the room and speak to the Republican leaders of the House and Senate alone, according to Arizona education officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2013 | Larry Gordon
Janet Napolitano views her new job as president of the University of California system as being primarily "a huge public advocate for higher ed. " The former Arizona governor and U.S. secretary of Homeland Security was an unusual choice for UC: a politician without prior leadership experience in academia. Napolitano, 56, the first woman to hold the post, is paid $570,000 a year plus housing to manage the sprawling chain of 10 campuses, five medical centers and numerous research centers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Reaction was broad and swift Thursday to the announcement by UC president Janet Napolitano that she would allocate $5 million in university funds to help the system's estimated 900 students who entered the country illegally.   The issue of how to treat those who don't have proper immigration papers is a hot one for Napolitano. Critics contend that, in her previous job as U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security, she oversaw an increase in deportations and they have protested her selection as UC president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
UC President Janet Napolitano got a mixed reception Friday during her first official visit to UCLA, facing protesters who objected to her actions as the onetime U.S. secretary of Homeland Security but also meeting with student leaders who praised her willingness to listen. Napolitano came to the Westwood campus for private meetings with students, faculty and administrators and to attend some seminars. Since assuming the presidency two weeks ago, she has been touring the 10-campus University of California system and learning more about its troubled finances, its massive facilities and the programs that enroll 230,000 students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
New University of California President Janet Napolitano received a mixed reception Friday during her first official visit to UCLA, facing protesters who dislike her past policies as U.S.  secretary of Homeland Security but also meeting with student leaders who praised her as listening to their concerns. Napolitano came to the Westwood campus for a series of private meetings with students, faculty and administrators. Since taking over the presidency two weeks ago, she has been touring the 10-campus system and learning more about its finances, massive facilities and programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The surprise selection of former U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano to head the UC system has fueled criticism over the secret selection process. Supporters of a more open method say that better decisions are made when three or four finalists for a university presidency or chancellorship are formally identified to the public. At that point, faculty and students could have a chance to meet them before a final selection. Though widely praised, the selection of Napolitano in July also came as a shock to many outside a relatively small circle of UC regents and other officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The University of California has leased an Oakland residence for incoming system president Janet Napolitano for $9,950 a month, officials said Monday. Napolitano, the former U.S. secretary of Homeland Security and former governor of Arizona, will be provided the housing plus an annual $570,000 salary, $8,916 a year for car expenses and $142,500 for one-time relocation costs. Napolitano is scheduled to begin her UC presidency Sept. 30, with her office at UC system headquarters in downtown Oakland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
UC President Janet Napolitano got a mixed reception Friday during her first official visit to UCLA, facing protesters who objected to her actions as the onetime U.S. secretary of Homeland Security but also meeting with student leaders who praised her willingness to listen. Napolitano came to the Westwood campus for private meetings with students, faculty and administrators and to attend some seminars. Since assuming the presidency two weeks ago, she has been touring the 10-campus University of California system and learning more about its troubled finances, its massive facilities and the programs that enroll 230,000 students.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The former top watchdog for the Homeland Security Department rewrote reports and slowed investigations at the request of senior staff for then-Secretary Janet Napolitano, a review conducted by Senate staff found. Charles K. Edwards, who was acting inspector general for Homeland Security from late 2011 through early 2013, considered aides to Napolitano to be friends, socialized with them over drinks and dinner and, at their urging, improperly made changes to several investigative reports, according to the Senate review released Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Adding their voices to a debate that also has engaged media organizations, UCLA's undergraduate student government recently approved a resolution that condemned the use of the term “illegal” when describing  immigrants in the U.S. without legal permission. The so-called “Drop the I-Word” resolution declared, in part, that: "We are aware that certain racially derogatory language used in media, political discourse and other institutional settings has historically bolstered the foundation for racially harmful actions including racial profiling practices, punitive policies targeting socially marginalized groups, hate crimes and violence.” It also said that some students have expressed fears about the appointment of Janet Napolitano as the next UC system president because she helped oversee an expansion of deportations during her recently concluded term as U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
Janet Napolitano has a message for the next head of the Department of Homeland Security: “You will need a large bottle of Advil.” In a farewell speech Tuesday, Napolitano gave a wide-ranging defense of her 4½f years as head of one of the government's youngest and most unwieldy departments. “Some have said that being the secretary of DHS is the most thankless job in Washington,” Napolitano said at the National Press Club in the capital. “That's not true. No doubt it is a very big and complex job. It is literally a 24/7 job,” she said.
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