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Janet Wilson

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NEWS
February 3, 2004 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The first miracle was the tree. A 3-foot-high sapling was all that stopped Glenn Mowbray's free fall down a sheer slope on New Year's Day. Mowbray spent hours with his heels dug in to the roots of the puny pine, staring down the boulder-strewn precipice that he knew would kill him if he lost his grip. "All the times I've laughed about being a tree-hugger, I take it all back," said Mowbray, 52. "This was a dress rehearsal for my death."
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NEWS
April 6, 2004 | Janet Wilson
Ed FORNER is 8,000 feet above the vast, sunburned desert. Stomach-dropping mountain ranges unfurl outside the tiny plane's cockpit, each more spectacular than the last: Panamint, Inyo, Last Chance, Sierra. But the pilot's not really looking. Sometimes he can't see the wild landscape he's charged with protecting for the roadblocks that Washington keeps throwing in his way, he says. "All I see are stop signs!" he shouts over the engine's whine.
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NEWS
April 6, 2004 | Janet Wilson
Ed FORNER is 8,000 feet above the vast, sunburned desert. Stomach-dropping mountain ranges unfurl outside the tiny plane's cockpit, each more spectacular than the last: Panamint, Inyo, Last Chance, Sierra. But the pilot's not really looking. Sometimes he can't see the wild landscape he's charged with protecting for the roadblocks that Washington keeps throwing in his way, he says. "All I see are stop signs!" he shouts over the engine's whine.
NEWS
February 3, 2004 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The first miracle was the tree. A 3-foot-high sapling was all that stopped Glenn Mowbray's free fall down a sheer slope on New Year's Day. Mowbray spent hours with his heels dug in to the roots of the puny pine, staring down the boulder-strewn precipice that he knew would kill him if he lost his grip. "All the times I've laughed about being a tree-hugger, I take it all back," said Mowbray, 52. "This was a dress rehearsal for my death."
NEWS
December 9, 2003 | Janet Wilson
Steve HOEFT sways back and forth with exhaustion. Nine hours and 85 miles in the saddle. Fifteen miles to go. Victory. Right there. Except that Crockett Dumas, one of the cagiest endurance riders alive, is out there in the dark desert, closing in. Denny sags too. Shivers ripple across the stallion's sweat-drenched coat. But the chestnut's heartbeat is strong. "You feel pretty good about your horse?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2003 | Stuart Pfeifer, Daniel Yi and Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writers
One man died and 10 other riders were hurt Friday when train cars filled with passengers broke loose from a locomotive in a dark tunnel on Disneyland's Big Thunder Mountain Railroad attraction. The accident occurred about 11:20 a.m. after the lead car, decorated to resemble a small red engine, and the open-top passenger cars sped through the faux desert landscape and uphill into a tunnel, where the cars separated and the locomotive derailed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2007 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The California Air Resources Board on Thursday banned popular in-home ozone air purifiers, saying studies have found that they can worsen conditions such as asthma that marketers claim they help to prevent. The regulation, which the board said is the first of its kind in the nation, will require testing and certification of all types of air purifiers. Any that emit more than a tiny amount of ozone will have to be pulled from the California market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2008 | Victoria Kim, Times Staff Writer
Slaughterhouse workers watch every move of federal inspectors. They know when they take bathroom breaks. They use the radio to alert one another to the inspector's every step. They even assign the pretty talkative woman to work next to the inspector to distract him from his mission to safeguard the nation's food supply. That cat-and-mouse game is portrayed by past and current inspectors, lawmakers and an audit report that say the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1986
Physicians Formula Cosmetics Inc., city of Industry, appointed Janet M. Wilson vice president-marketing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2004 | Kimi Yoshino, David Haldane and Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writers
A bike rider was attacked by a mountain lion as she rode through a popular Orange County wilderness park Thursday, and the body of a man, who may have been killed by the same animal, was found nearby. If confirmed, the death would be the first killing of a human by a mountain lion in California since 1994. Hours later, sheriff's deputies shot to death a mountain lion spotted near where the man's body had been found.
NEWS
December 9, 2003 | Janet Wilson
Steve HOEFT sways back and forth with exhaustion. Nine hours and 85 miles in the saddle. Fifteen miles to go. Victory. Right there. Except that Crockett Dumas, one of the cagiest endurance riders alive, is out there in the dark desert, closing in. Denny sags too. Shivers ripple across the stallion's sweat-drenched coat. But the chestnut's heartbeat is strong. "You feel pretty good about your horse?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2007 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Ash from wildfires in Southern California's residential neighborhoods poses a serious threat to people and ecosystems because it is extremely caustic and contains high levels of arsenic, lead and other toxic metals, according to a study by federal geologists released Tuesday. U.S. Geological Survey scientists warned that rainstorms, which are forecast for the region beginning Friday, are likely to wash the dangerous substances into waterways, polluting streams and threatening wildlife.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2006 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
If ever there was a Congress in which Republicans were positioned to remake the nation's environmental laws, it was the 109th. But by the time the session ended last week, the GOP's environmental agenda had been largely thwarted. Whether it was rewriting the Endangered Species Act, opening up most of the nation's coastline to oil and gas drilling, or selling off public lands in the West, Republicans failed to enact a range of ambitious proposals.
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