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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013
In an unusual move, putting a national-level politician in a position usually held by an academic, U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano was selected to lead the University of California system, The Times reported Friday morning . The former Arizona governor's appointment also means the 10-campus system will be headed by a woman for the first time in its 145-year history. Napolitano's nomination by a committee of UC regents came after a secretive process that insiders said initially focused on her as a high-profile, though nontraditional, candidate who has led large public agencies and shown a strong interest in improving education.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The nomination of Janet Napolitano, the U.S. secretary of Homeland Security, to be the next president of the University of California signals a desire for change at the sprawling 10-campus system and hopes that a highly visible political personality may be able to raise more money and play a more influential role in Sacramento and Washington. Besides being the first woman expected to be named president in UC's 145-year history, Napolitano is thought to be only the second true outsider and the first without any record of helping to run a university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Janet Napolitano, the U.S. secretary of Homeland Security and former governor of Arizona, is being named as the next president of the University of California system, in an unusual choice that brings a national-level politician to a position usually held by an academic, The Times has learned. Her appointment also means the 10-campus system will be headed by a woman for the first time in its 145-year history. Napolitano's nomination by a committee of UC regents came after a secretive process that insiders said focused on her early as a high-profile, although untraditional, candidate who has led large public agencies and shown a strong interest in improving education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
An intensive hunt for a fugitive couple wanted in connection with the killing of their 2-year-old daughter in Mississippi is underway in Maywood and surrounding cities after the pair was allegedly spotted in the area selling cars, DVDs and puppies. Janet and Ramon Barreto were seen as recently as last weekend in Maywood and other southeast L.A. County cities selling items and living out of a car and friends' homes, said Tony Burke of the U.S. Marshals Service. Law enforcement officials began looking for the couple after Janet Barreto failed to appear on charges of manslaughter of a child, three counts of child abuse, six counts of child neglect and tampering with a witness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Irfan Khan
Olympic gold medalist Janet Evans promoted water safety Tuesday while  joining in an attempt to set a world record for the largest simultaneous swimming lesson. Evans delivered her pitch at a pool facility in La Mirada, one of 700 around the world participating in the event. Aside from setting a record, the endeavor -- billed as "The World's Largest Swimming Lesson" -- had a more serious aim: to stress the importance of teaching children to swim to help prevent drowning. "Drowning is an epidemic in our country," said Evans, who won gold medals in swimming at the 1988 and 1992 Olympics.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Meg James
A battle-tested veteran of News Corp.'s general counsel's office will take on additional duties following the corporate spinoff set for June 28. The company announced Monday that Janet Nova, deputy general counsel, will become executive vice president and deputy group general counsel for 21st Century Fox. She will help manage day-to-day operations of one of the nation's busiest corporate legal offices. Nova, who has been a key member of News Corp.'s legal team since 1997, will oversee legal aspects of Fox's acquisition strategy, capital markets transactions and Securities & Exchange Commission filings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Janet Jackson has reportedly joined the billionaires club. Funny thing: The singer isn't actually a billionaire.  The pop star, 47, was named a "billion dollar entertainer" by Variety, but depending on how you calculate net worth, it doesn't actually mean she's a billionaire at all. In fact, the only "billionaire"-related reference from Variety comes in the form of a small black label on the article that actually reads "Billion-dollar entertainer:...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Janet Malcolm may end up best known for a single paragraph: the one that starts her 1990 book "The Journalist and the Murderer. " "Every journalist who is not too stupid or too full of himself to notice what is going on knows that what he does is morally indefensible," she writes there. "He is a kind of confidence man, preying on people's vanity, ignorance, or loneliness, gaining their trust and betraying them without remorse. " The indictment is more powerful because Malcolm never renders herself immune.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Janet Fitch's first novel, "White Oleander," hit big when it was picked by Oprah for her book club. Before that happened, she was just another aspiring writer in this big city. She sat down with me at the L.A. Times Festival of Books and talked about who she used to come to see. Sometimes, when she couldn't get tickets to see an author, she'd sit on the grass and watch readers and writers pass by. Once, when her own writing wasn't going well, she couldn't bear to attend. That time passed -- she published "Paint It Black" in 2006 and is now hard at work on a new, very different novel.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - On the third day of hearings on a bill to overhaul the immigration system, senators took a break from partisan sniping and grilled Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano on whether the Boston bombings had exposed shortcomings in the nation's immigration security apparatus. Conservative Republicans have tried to slow the Senate bill since two brothers, ethnic Chechens granted political asylum from Russia as minors with their family, were identified as the suspects in last week's bombings.
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