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Janez Jansa

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NEWS
July 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia's collective presidency, in a move that could prop up the troubled federation, resurrected itself early today and elected Croatia's Stipe Mesic as head of state. The action in the federal capital of Belgrade removed a major obstacle to working out a European-mediated peace in the disintegrating country.
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NEWS
July 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia's collective presidency, in a move that could prop up the troubled federation, resurrected itself early today and elected Croatia's Stipe Mesic as head of state. The action in the federal capital of Belgrade removed a major obstacle to working out a European-mediated peace in the disintegrating country.
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NEWS
June 22, 1988
An estimated 15,000 to 20,000 Yugoslavs rallied in Ljubljana, capital of the Slovenia republic, to protest the arrests earlier this month of two journalists and a soldier charged with disclosing military secrets in articles critical of the armed forces. David Tasic, the editor of Mladina, the weekly newspaper of the Slovenian Youth Union, was arrested along with Janez Jansa, a free-lance journalist who wrote several articles criticizing the military, many of which were published in Mladina. Sgt.
WORLD
June 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush opened a farewell tour of Europe in tiny, picturesque Slovenia, current head of the European Union and the most successful state to emerge from the violent breakup of Yugoslavia in the 1990s. Home to just 2 million people, the Alpine country is hosting this week's annual summit between the United States and the 27-nation European Union. The two sides will debate such issues as the Iranian nuclear program and a ban on U.S. poultry imports, though officials expect few firm agreements.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Slovenia and Croatia defied federal army warnings to disarm their militias by midnight Saturday, and the deadline was extended. A terse report from the state news agency Tanjug said, without elaboration, that the collective federal presidency extended the deadline until midnight Monday "following a Croatian request." Authorities in the two republics had put their defense forces on highest alert and citizens were hoarding food supplies, media reports from Slovenia and Croatia said.
WORLD
June 11, 2008 | From the Washington Post
President Bush and European Union leaders threatened Iran on Tuesday with new financial sanctions unless the country curbs its nuclear ambitions and opens facilities to international inspection. After a two-hour meeting that also touched on other issues, Bush and his European counterparts indicated that they were prepared to go beyond current United Nations sanctions to try to ensure that Iran does not develop a nuclear weapon.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their jumble of peoples and politics, the Balkans have for centuries been a wellspring of intrigue. But never have the Byzantine origins been so apparent and conspiracy theories so profuse as in these dying days of the Yugoslav federation. To hear Serbia tell it, the encroaching civil war has been instigated by Germany and Austria under a plot to reclaim Balkan territory occupied in wartime en route to establishing a "Fourth Reich."
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | DUSAN STOJANOVIC, ASSOCIATED PRESS
More than 100,000 people dead or missing, 2 million displaced, tens of thousands hungry. Countless homes, churches, mosques destroyed. Women raped, children mutilated, a generation of men lost in battle. Thus reads the list of horrors that began with a weekend independence referendum Feb. 29 and March 1, 1992, requested by the European Community as a precursor to recognizing the new nation of Bosnia-Herzegovina. The Muslim-Croatian majority, haunted by months of Serb-Croatian warfare after Croatia split from Yugoslavia in 1991, said yes and hoped for international protection.
WORLD
November 29, 2005 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
With most Muslim leaders staying away, a summit of European and Mediterranean nations floundered badly on the critical point of defining terrorism and instead concluded Monday with a watered-down "code of conduct" and a vague plan for the region's other urgent issue, immigration. The two-day meeting convened delegations from 25 European nations, Israel and nine Muslim governments ringing the Mediterranean.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav army and Slovenia appeared headed for an all-out war Monday after trading charges of violating a cease-fire and threatening to take whatever measures necessary to defend their territory. The Serbian-dominated high command in Belgrade ordered a massive mobilization of 200,000 "appropriate" reservists. Residents of the federal capital said young men were being stopped by police for random conscription checks.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav People's Army declared Tuesday that it is at war with Slovenia after deadly clashes erupted throughout the breakaway republic, inflicting casualties on surrounded and demoralized federal troops. Fierce fighting along Slovenia's border with Croatia cast the republic into a state of siege. Federal soldiers in armored columns exchanged fire with Slovenian territorial defense forces, with the army suffering at least 10 deaths and 13 injuries.
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