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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011
A roundup of entertainment headlines for Friday. Jani Lane, former frontman of the metal band Warrant, has been found dead in a Woodland Hills hotel. He was 47. ( Los Angeles Times ) Sorry, everybody. There will be no wedding in Bert and Ernie's future. ( Los Angeles Times ) Another season of "So You Think You Can Dance" has crowned its winner. ( Los Angeles Times ) The rest of the stock market may be see-sawing, but shares of Electronic Arts are going up, up, up thanks to an upcoming Star Wars video game.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Jani Lane, the lead singer for Warrant, a popular 1980s metal band that often had hits with songs he penned, including "Cherry Pie" and "Heaven," has died. He was 47. Lane was found dead Thursday evening in a Woodland Hills hotel, said Sara Faden, a Los Angeles police officer. The cause of death was not known and an autopsy was scheduled. With his long blond hair and tight leather outfits, Lane embodied the excess of 1980s "hair metal" rock bands. After he joined Warrant in 1984, the band rose on the Sunset Strip circuit alongside kindred spirit Guns N' Roses and eventually signed with Columbia Records.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Jani Lane, the lead singer for Warrant, a popular 1980s metal band that often had hits with songs he penned, including "Cherry Pie" and "Heaven," has died. He was 47. Lane was found dead Thursday evening in a Woodland Hills hotel, said Sara Faden, a Los Angeles police officer. The cause of death was not known and an autopsy was scheduled. With his long blond hair and tight leather outfits, Lane embodied the excess of 1980s "hair metal" rock bands. After he joined Warrant in 1984, the band rose on the Sunset Strip circuit alongside kindred spirit Guns N' Roses and eventually signed with Columbia Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011
A roundup of entertainment headlines for Friday. Jani Lane, former frontman of the metal band Warrant, has been found dead in a Woodland Hills hotel. He was 47. ( Los Angeles Times ) Sorry, everybody. There will be no wedding in Bert and Ernie's future. ( Los Angeles Times ) Another season of "So You Think You Can Dance" has crowned its winner. ( Los Angeles Times ) The rest of the stock market may be see-sawing, but shares of Electronic Arts are going up, up, up thanks to an upcoming Star Wars video game.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
To outsiders, most hard-rockers seem patterned after the same stereotypical images: swaggering, macho dudes living a life on the extremes--all parties, women and booze. This notion does have basis in fact, solidified and distilled as the hard-rock torch has been passed from generation to generation--from the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin down through Motley Crue and Guns N' Roses. It's the ultimate teen party music and there's a never-ending parade of new stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT, A periodic survey of pop-related laser discs, books and videocassettes. Ratings are on a scale of one star (poor) to five stars (a classic.)
For a 55-minute tape of a live metal show, this is pretty dead. Blame it mostly on the mundane work by the editors and cameramen--though lead singer Jani Lane might take a few showmanship lessons from Skid Row's Sebastian Bach. Mixed in among the concert footage are scenes of a slimy caricature of a conniving businessman watching the show. Actually, his babbling is more entertaining than the band's antics--with one exception: His use of a common anti-gay epithet is an inexcusable lapse of
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
'If this doesn't make you feel sleazy," promised Warrant lead cusser-singer Jani Lane at the Universal Amphitheatre on Wednesday, "nothing will." Would he settle for sleepy? The hit-making hard-rock quintet did its darndest to be distasteful at this hometown show, from the $10 souvenir G-strings to all the Tipper Gore-baiting bad language a brave fifth-grader might muster.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"If this doesn't make you feel sleazy," promised Warrant lead cusser-singer Jani Lane during Wednesday's Universal Amphitheatre show, "nothing will." Would he settle for sleepy? The hit-making hard-rock quintet did its darndest to be distasteful at this hometown show, from the $10 souvenir G-strings to all the Tipper Gore-baiting bad language a brave fifth-grader might muster.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT
Much of Warrant's success is due to its clever pandering to the sexism rampant among young metalmaniacs. On its second album, which features mostly high-powered rockers, Warrant is at its macho best with the Queen-influenced "Cherry Pie," a raunchy ode to a sexpot, and "Love in Stereo," which celebrates having sex with two women simultaneously.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
To outsiders, most hard-rockers seem patterned after the same stereotypical images: swaggering, macho dudes living a life on the extremes--all parties, women and booze. This notion does have basis in fact, solidified and distilled as the hard-rock torch has been passed from generation to generation--from the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin down through Motley Crue and Guns N' Roses. It's the ultimate teen party music and there's a never-ending parade of new stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1989 | JANISS GARZA
The last time Warrant played in its hometown of Los Angeles, it was headlining a club on the Sunset Strip. Saturday night, a scant four months later, the quintet headlined the 6,000-seat Universal Amphitheater. This was a daring jump that could have easily backfired: Would the place be empty? Would the band be able to project in the larger surroundings? But the move was on the money. The Amphitheater was more than three-quarters filled with a mainly teen (and younger) audience, and Warrant came through with a potent, 90-minute dose of its high-profile hard rock.
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