Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJanice Bryant Howroyd
IN THE NEWS

Janice Bryant Howroyd

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 22, 1997 | DENISE HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It wasn't until Janice Bryant Howroyd took an economics class in college that she realized how poor she had been, growing up as one of 11 children in a small town in the segregated South. That's because despite poverty, Howroyd's family and community bombarded the young girl with love and instilled self-confidence and respect for education--qualities that have sustained the Tarboro, N.C.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 22, 1997 | DENISE HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It wasn't until Janice Bryant Howroyd took an economics class in college that she realized how poor she had been, growing up as one of 11 children in a small town in the segregated South. That's because despite poverty, Howroyd's family and community bombarded the young girl with love and instilled self-confidence and respect for education--qualities that have sustained the Tarboro, N.C.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 3, 1999
Barshefsky to Beijing: Top U.S. trade envoy Charlene Barshefsky heads to China today to take stock of Beijing's bid to join the World Trade Organization, but chances of a deal any time soon appear slim. U.S. officials have expressed hope that China would use the upcoming U.S. visit of Premier Zhu Rongji to make a fresh commitment to join the global trading regime by year-end, when a new round of world trade talks is set to begin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998
Three business leaders and a corporation will receive the 1998 Life Enrichment Awards from Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science at a ceremony Thursday in Beverly Hills. The school, based in Willowbrook, will honor the recipients who "contribute to creating environments in which individuals are inspired or empowered to take control over their own lives and create healthy communities," said W. Benton Boone, interim university president.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2010 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
Small-business owner Patricia Watts recently graduated from a two-year mentorship program for minority-owned companies. But Watts, who is chief executive of FCI Management Consultants in Long Beach, didn't get just know-how out of the program. She also scored a job for her energy services company from one of the corporate mentors, sports and entertainment giant AEG. It's a small job for Watts' company, but it opens the door to possibly do more work for AEG, which owns Staples Center and other major facilities.
NEWS
July 5, 1994 | BRIDGET BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Terry McMillan accepted her honor in memory of her "Mama." Angela Bassett paid tribute to "Mom." The National Book Award-winning author and the Oscar nominated actress were named 1994 Black Women of Achievement Key honorees by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund at a luncheon Thursday at the Century Plaza. "I try to do my best in everything I do," McMillan said.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD
Nonprofit group will provide Orange County classes in starting a business and making it grow. A program that has helped 3,500 women entrepreneurs in Los Angeles County is expanding into Orange County, with classes beginning in September. California AWED, American Woman's Economic Development Corporation, offers classes in starting a business and making a business grow. Though it markets its services especially to low-income and minority women, it is open to all.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | PATT DIROLL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Forty foster children from Children's Institute International were included at the benefit performance of "The Lion King" at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood on Oct. 28, sponsored by CHIPS (Colleague Helpers in Philanthropic Service), which raised $50,000 for programs at the institute. . . . Catholics in Media Associates held its eighth annual Mass and Awards Luncheon on Oct. 29 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, with Cardinal Roger Mahony presiding.
OPINION
July 25, 1999 | Susan Anderson, Susan Anderson's short story "Josephine Baker at the Club Alabam" appears in the current Obsidian II: Black Literature, in Review
From Mark Twain's Pudd'nhead Wilson to television's George Jefferson, wealthy African Americans are seldom accepted on their own terms. When not satirized in the media, they are frequently portrayed as "sell-outs" who "make it" by turning their backs on their own. This negative attitude is partly traceable to sociologist E. Franklin Frazier's seminal "Black Bourgeoisie: The Rise of a New Middle Class."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|