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Janice Knowlton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horrifying memories, surfacing now after being repressed for more than 40 years, have convinced Janice Knowlton that her father was a killer, possibly even the infamous Black Dahlia murderer. Knowlton's apparent recollections have impressed Westminister police detectives enough that today they will dig up the site of her former residence, now a vacant lot, in search of evidence of a crime--possibly the Black Dahlia victim's belongings or the body of another woman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
For more than a decade, Janice Knowlton believed she knew the answer to a question that has long intrigued crime buffs: Who killed the Black Dahlia? Knowlton was 10 years old and living in Westminster when the nude body of Hollywood hopeful Elizabeth Short -- bisected at the waist and drained of blood -- was found Jan. 15, 1947, in a vacant lot in the Leimert Park district of southwest Los Angeles.
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NEWS
June 23, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rusty knife, farm implements and costume jewelry were dug up Saturday in a vacant lot during a police excavation prompted by a woman's belief that her father long ago was not only a killer, but the infamous, and never captured, Black Dahlia murderer. Based on the woman's recollections, apparently repressed for more than four decades, Westminster police officials supervised the excavation of a dirt lot where the woman's childhood home stood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rusty knife, animal bone fragments and costume jewelry were found Saturday buried in a vacant lot as police checked a woman's ghastly story that her father was a killer--perhaps, as she contends, the infamous Black Dahlia murderer. Based on the woman's horrifying memories, apparently repressed for more than four decades, Westminster police excavated the site of the woman's former home but found no conclusive evidence of a murder. Although the items found are "very interesting," Police Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rusty knife, animal bone fragments and costume jewelry were found Saturday buried in a vacant lot as police checked a woman's ghastly story that her father was a killer--perhaps, as she contends, the infamous Black Dahlia murderer. Based on the woman's horrifying memories, apparently repressed for more than four decades, Westminster police excavated the site of the woman's former home but found no conclusive evidence of a murder. Although the items found are "very interesting," Police Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horrifying memories, surfacing now after being repressed for more than 40 years, have convinced Janice Knowlton, 54, that her father was a killer, possibly even the infamous Black Dahlia murderer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
For more than a decade, Janice Knowlton believed she knew the answer to a question that has long intrigued crime buffs: Who killed the Black Dahlia? Knowlton was 10 years old and living in Westminster when the nude body of Hollywood hopeful Elizabeth Short -- bisected at the waist and drained of blood -- was found Jan. 15, 1947, in a vacant lot in the Leimert Park district of southwest Los Angeles.
MAGAZINE
June 21, 1992
Is it axiomatic that a "great baseball mind" only comes with a foul mouth, spitting out filth and downgrading jokes about women? I have a fantasy of Anita Hill buying the Angels simply to watch Herzog's rump-first exit from her office, "fingering his hat in hand," as he explains what he meant by: "I should be careful today, huh? Can't go 'round tellin' my secretary she's got a cute ass or else I'll never become a Supreme Court Judge"? And if pitcher Mark Langston's actress wife ever gets a deciding share of Angels' stock, I want to be there when she corners Herzog in the board room to ask about his crack that "she ain't that pretty."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1996
Call me a cynic, but Michael Sullivan's commentary on how broadcast journalism can be fixed ("Too Much Dessert?," Jan. 7) will fall on deaf ears in a city where it's ingrained to measure real success or failure only in terms of numbers, either dollars or ratings. In 1960, Edward R. Murrow said that the death knell for broadcast news would occur the moment the broadcasting corporations discovered that news could be made profitable. Last year, in his book "Tinker on Television," Grant Tinker said it was the responsibility of broadcasters to allow news divisions to operate in the public interest without being held responsible for generating profit.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rusty knife, farm implements and costume jewelry were dug up Saturday in a vacant lot during a police excavation prompted by a woman's belief that her father long ago was not only a killer, but the infamous, and never captured, Black Dahlia murderer. Based on the woman's recollections, apparently repressed for more than four decades, Westminster police officials supervised the excavation of a dirt lot where the woman's childhood home stood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horrifying memories, surfacing now after being repressed for more than 40 years, have convinced Janice Knowlton that her father was a killer, possibly even the infamous Black Dahlia murderer. Knowlton's apparent recollections have impressed Westminister police detectives enough that today they will dig up the site of her former residence, now a vacant lot, in search of evidence of a crime--possibly the Black Dahlia victim's belongings or the body of another woman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horrifying memories, surfacing now after being repressed for more than 40 years, have convinced Janice Knowlton, 54, that her father was a killer, possibly even the infamous Black Dahlia murderer.
BOOKS
May 25, 2003 | Gary Indiana, Gary Indiana is the author of numerous novels, including "Resentment: A Comedy" and "Do Everything in the Dark," published this month.
She came to Los Angeles during World War II from nowhere special, a pretty girl with big hair and bad teeth who liked to go to bars and nightclubs. She believed in love and romance and lived on hot dogs and Coca-Cola, lavished hours on her makeup in dollar-a-night furnished rooms. A drifter, something of a cipher, she was a person people remembered vaguely but could never quite pull into focus.
MAGAZINE
November 21, 2004 | Paul Teetor, Paul Teetor's last story for the magazine was about a mentally ill woman charged with a hate-crime murder.
Steve Hodel is facing the ultimate crime writer's challenge: a room full of retired cops who have read his national bestseller "Black Dahlia Avenger: A Genius for Murder." As Hodel gets out of his Ford Crown Victoria, host Garland Brown, a 62-year-old former Gardena cop with 35 years in law enforcement, introduces himself. "A lot of the guys have some serious questions," he says. "They've all read the hardcover, and the paperback with the new chapter. They know what they're talking about."
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