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Janice Rogers Brown

The California Supreme Court this week threw out a jury instruction that permitted judges in criminal trials to admonish jurors to report other panelists who refused to deliberate or intended to disregard the law. In a 4-3 ruling, the court said its disapproval of the 1998 jury instruction would not affect defendants who already had been convicted in trials where it had been given.
July 26, 2003 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
President Bush late Friday nominated California Supreme Court Justice Janice Rogers Brown to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Her nomination to one of three vacancies on the D.C. Circuit, considered a steppingstone to the U.S. Supreme Court, is expected to draw fire from U.S. Senate Democrats. It also would create the first vacancy on the state Supreme Court in two years. "I am honored to be considered for appointment to the D.C. Circuit.
January 7, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court has turned away a challenge to President Obama's policy of expanding government-funded research using embryonic stem cells that scientists say may offer hope for new treatments for spinal injuries and Parkinson's disease. The court's action brings a quiet end to a lawsuit that briefly threatened to derail all funding for such research.  A federal judge in Washington in 2010 ordered the National Institutes of Health to halt funding of the research, citing a long-standing congressional ban on spending for research in which “human embryos are destroyed.” But an appeals court overturned that order and ruled last year that the ban applied only to research which destroyed human embryos so as to obtain stem cells.
April 28, 2005
Re "Faith 'War' Rages in U.S., Judge Says," April 26: California Supreme Court Justice Janice Rogers Brown may claim that "these are perilous times for people of faith." She may even delude herself into thinking that our goal as secularists is to stamp out her faith. But surely even she must recognize that the times are just as perilous for those of us who do not subscribe to hard-line Christianity. At every turn, we are demonized as the enemies of all believers, simply because we do not want their narrow-minded doctrine forced onto the rest of us. The main difference between myself and Brown is this: When I get up in the morning, I couldn't care less about her faith; when she gets up, she is hellbent on making me obey that faith.
October 14, 2005 | JONATHAN CHAIT
ONE OF THE MANY lessons conservatives seem to be learning from the Harriet E. Miers imbroglio is that it's no fun to be on the receiving end of a vicious smear from the Bush administration. Last week, Ed Gillespie -- the former Republican National Committee chairman designated by Bush to flack for his nominee -- told a group of conservative activists that the criticism of Miers had a "whiff of sexism." And then, to show it's no fluke, Laura Bush repeated the sexism charge this week.
May 18, 2005 | PATT MORRISON
This is Hollywood, people, and in Hollywood we can't let even a game show -- far less a boffo cinematic moment in American politics -- pass by without a musical score: So. Should today's Senate confrontation be performed to the wet-your-pants suspenseful music from "Jaws"? The screeching violin terror from "Psycho"? The heart-cracking adagio lament from "Platoon"? Or the blackcomedic "Springtime for Hitler" from "The Producers"?
April 26, 2005 | Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writer
Just days after a bitterly divided Senate committee voted along party lines to approve her nomination as a federal appellate court judge, California Supreme Court Justice Janice Rogers Brown told an audience Sunday that people of faith were embroiled in a "war" against secular humanists who threatened to divorce America from its religious roots, according to a newspaper account of the speech.
July 24, 2007 | Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writer
A longtime Republican activist credited with helping revitalize the GOP in San Bernardino County was appointed to a judgeship by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in May even though he was rated "not qualified" by a state bar committee, the bar announced Monday. But a spokeswoman for the State Bar of California said the organization and members of the judicial evaluating commission were legally prohibited from explaining why San Bernardino Superior Court Judge Elia Pirozzi was deemed unqualified.
August 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
The heirs of an uninsured driver killed in a crash can sue for damages beyond the limits placed by California voters on lawsuits by the uninsured drivers themselves, the state Supreme Court ruled Monday. It was the second ruling in a week to limit the scope of Proposition 213, an insurer-backed 1996 initiative that barred uninsured drivers from recovering damages for "noneconomic" harm such as pain and suffering. The measure allowed them to sue only for economic damages such as wage losses.
February 22, 2013
The Supreme Court long ago established that Americans have a 1st Amendment right to spend unlimited amounts on behalf of a political candidate as long as the money is spent independently - and not given directly to or coordinated with the candidate's campaign. But even as the court has upheld limitless independent spending, it has also repeatedly acknowledged Congress' authority to set limits on direct contributions to political campaigns. Now, in an ominous sign that that distinction may soon fall by the wayside, the court has agreed to hear a constitutional challenge to the long-standing federal limits on the total amount an individual may donate to candidates and political committees during an election cycle.
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