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MAGAZINE
July 21, 1996 | DAVID WISE, David Wise, who lives in Washington, is the author of "Nightmover: How Aldrich Ames Sold the CIA to the KGB for $4.6 Million."
Well," said Jerry Gruner, "there's Jamaica." Sitting there in Gruner's office at the Central Intelligence Agency's headquarters in Langley, Va., CIA officer Janine Brookner knew exactly what the suave chief of the Latin American Division was offering her: Jamaica was the pits, the CIA station from hell. After 20 years as a successful CIA spy, Brookner was battling for a coveted position as a station chief.
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MAGAZINE
August 25, 1996
I was downright disgusted to read about certain CIA officials engaging in behavior we normally attribute to the secret police of despotic regimes ("She Fought the CIA . . . and Won," by David Wise, July 21). For officials of our own intelligence community, on whom the highest levels of our government rely, to act in such a way is something that must be stopped. "Power, absolute power corrupts absolutely," said the British statesman Lord Acton. Those found guilty of framing Janine Brookner because she did not play the "old boys' network" game should be punished.
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MAGAZINE
August 25, 1996
I was downright disgusted to read about certain CIA officials engaging in behavior we normally attribute to the secret police of despotic regimes ("She Fought the CIA . . . and Won," by David Wise, July 21). For officials of our own intelligence community, on whom the highest levels of our government rely, to act in such a way is something that must be stopped. "Power, absolute power corrupts absolutely," said the British statesman Lord Acton. Those found guilty of framing Janine Brookner because she did not play the "old boys' network" game should be punished.
MAGAZINE
July 21, 1996 | DAVID WISE, David Wise, who lives in Washington, is the author of "Nightmover: How Aldrich Ames Sold the CIA to the KGB for $4.6 Million."
Well," said Jerry Gruner, "there's Jamaica." Sitting there in Gruner's office at the Central Intelligence Agency's headquarters in Langley, Va., CIA officer Janine Brookner knew exactly what the suave chief of the Latin American Division was offering her: Jamaica was the pits, the CIA station from hell. After 20 years as a successful CIA spy, Brookner was battling for a coveted position as a station chief.
MAGAZINE
September 22, 1996
David Wise's response to the letter from Pam Johnston (Aug. 25) stopped a little short of mentioning who, in the long run, pays for judgments such as the settlement Janine Brookner received ("She Fought the CIA . . . and Won," July 21). The U.S. Treasury is not the ultimate payer. The U.S. taxpayer is. Karl V. Turner Jr. Long Beach
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking her five-month silence, the wife of FBI spy Robert Philip Hanssen said Thursday that she deeply regrets the damage her husband has caused the United States and believes it is "appropriate" that he spend the rest of his life in prison. As a devout Catholic, Bonnie Hanssen "feels that he needs time [in prison] to pray for forgiveness and be redeemed in some way," the wife's attorney, Janine Brookner, said in an interview. "It's difficult, but it's better than seeing him put to death."
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Central Intelligence Agency, in a clear admission that it has discriminated systematically against its women secret agents for years, said Wednesday that it has agreed to settle a class-action suit filed by several hundred women clandestine officers. The settlement requires the agency to provide $940,000 in back pay and bestow 25 retroactive promotions to victims of what lawyers for the women call a pervasive culture of sexual discrimination.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CIA director R. James Woolsey, under fire for months for his handling of the Aldrich H. Ames spy case and lacking strong support in the White House and Congress, resigned abruptly on Wednesday. The nation's first post-Cold War spy chief never forcefully seized control of a sprawling, $30-billion-a-year intelligence bureaucracy and was not seen by his own employees or by his overseers on Capitol Hill as a strong advocate of intelligence programs.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The CIA has agreed to settle a sex discrimination lawsuit brought by a veteran senior female agent under which the agency will pay her $410,000, plus attorney fees and court costs, sources involved in the matter said Wednesday. "This settlement does not concede the assertions of gender discrimination" that the agent made against the agency or its individual officers, the CIA said in a statement. Rather, CIA Director R.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reaching final agreement with the CIA over a $410,000 settlement in a sex discrimination suit, a veteran female agent expressed hope Friday that the agency would change its leadership and culture to remove the "fear of reprisal and retribution" that plagued her. Her lawyer said she remains concerned that the CIA fails to investigate male employees accused of wife beating and to discipline those found to have done so.
NEWS
October 10, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
According to accounts reaching Washington in the late 1980s, the Central Intelligence Agency station in Jamaica was a menagerie of misfits, incompetents and twisted personalities--an overstaffed way station for time-servers no one else wanted. The deputy station chief reportedly assaulted his wife repeatedly, once throttling her until she passed out. Another agent was cited for getting drunk in a hotel bar and screaming out her rage against the CIA.
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