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Janis Karpinski

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NATIONAL
May 6, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
President Bush has approved the demotion of Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski, the Army Reserve commander once in charge of the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, Army officials announced Thursday. The Army said she failed to properly supervise guards who in the fall of 2003 routinely abused and sexually humiliated Iraqi prisoners.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 6, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
President Bush has approved the demotion of Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski, the Army Reserve commander once in charge of the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, Army officials announced Thursday. The Army said she failed to properly supervise guards who in the fall of 2003 routinely abused and sexually humiliated Iraqi prisoners.
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WORLD
December 5, 2004 | From Associated Press
A military judge on Saturday ordered the former commander of U.S. prisons in Iraq to testify at the trial of a soldier who says he was ordered to abuse detainees at Abu Ghraib. The judge, Army Col. James Pohl, said Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski's testimony at the trial of Sgt. Javal S. Davis would be limited to conditions at Abu Ghraib and interactions there between guards and interrogators. Davis has acknowledged stepping on the fingers and toes of detainees.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2006 | From Associated Press
Army documents released Thursday substantiate assertions by Janis Karpinski, the highest-ranking officer punished in the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal, that she was innocent of two principal allegations lodged against her by the officer who initially investigated the case.
WORLD
April 29, 2004 | From Times staff and wire reports
U.S. military police stacked naked Iraqi prisoners in a human pyramid, and attached wires to one detainee to convince him he might be electrocuted, according to photographs obtained by CBS News that led to criminal charges against six American soldiers. CBS said the photos, shown Wednesday night on "60 Minutes II," were taken late last year at Abu Ghraib prison near Baghdad, where American soldiers have held hundreds of prisoners captured during the invasion and occupation of Iraq.
WORLD
November 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Iraqis recently freed from U.S. detention camps report that forbidden talk could earn a prisoner hours bound and stretched out in the sun and that detainees swinging tent poles rise up regularly against their jailers. "They don't respect anyone, old or young," Rahad Naif said of his U.S. Army guards. He and others told of detainees in wheelchairs, and of a man carried into a stifling hot tent in his sickbed. "They humiliate everybody."
OPINION
August 27, 2004
An independent panel that included two former secretaries of Defense and a separate investigating team led by two Army generals heaped yet more withering criticism this week on the Pentagon's handling of Iraq after the invasion. The findings dealt with the abuses at Abu Ghraib prison, but they should be read as condemning more than just the sickening scenes of torture documented in widely seen photographs.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2005 | From Reuters
An Army reservist accused of attaching wires to a hooded Iraqi prisoner did so in a joke shared with the prisoner, her lawyer said at the start of a court-martial Thursday. Spc. Sabrina Harman, who pleaded not guilty to charges of conspiracy, dereliction of duty and maltreatment, also photographed abuses because she wanted to document what she felt was wrongful behavior, lawyer Frank Spinner said. "She was upset as early as 20 October, 2003, at some of the things she was seeing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The Sundance Channel, to commemorate Sunday's third anniversary of the start of the war in Iraq, is offering four efforts meant to show that the U.S. mission is misbegotten, mean-spirited and doomed to failure. In the parlance of the troops, the programmers at Sundance clearly think the mission is FUBAR, which, cleaned up slightly, means Fouled Up Beyond All Recognition.
OPINION
May 15, 2005
The release a year ago of photographs of American soldiers performing twisted acts like holding Iraqi prisoners at the end of a leash stamped the name Abu Ghraib with a notoriety that will last for decades. Some soldiers are being held accountable, either with jail time or loss of rank, but the scandal also has shone light on the issue of mistreatment of detainees beyond Iraq, a matter that requires a far-reaching investigation independent of U.S. intelligence agencies or the military.
WORLD
April 23, 2005 | From the Baltimore Sun
A comprehensive Army review has determined that top officers stationed in Iraq during the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, including Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, should not be held liable for any wrongdoing or leadership failures, congressional sources said. Reviews by the Army Inspector General's office and the Judge Advocate General, the service's top lawyer, found no substance to any allegation against Sanchez, who was the senior ground commander in Iraq, or his key staff, according to these sources.
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