Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJanjaweed Militia
IN THE NEWS

Janjaweed Militia

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
January 22, 2008 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Sudan's government said Monday that it had appointed a militia leader accused of atrocities in Darfur as the special advisor to its president, sparking outrage from human rights groups. Musa Hilal is under a Security Council travel ban for his alleged role in the two-year targeted attacks on civilians in Darfur, and his assets have been ordered frozen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
January 22, 2008 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Sudan's government said Monday that it had appointed a militia leader accused of atrocities in Darfur as the special advisor to its president, sparking outrage from human rights groups. Musa Hilal is under a Security Council travel ban for his alleged role in the two-year targeted attacks on civilians in Darfur, and his assets have been ordered frozen.
Advertisement
WORLD
May 17, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Barefoot and half-naked, Hamesa Adam carried two sons on her back for six days across the searing Sudanese desert. Two other children, missing their dead father, walked barefoot, and two more rode a donkey. But 6-year-old Mohammed, one of the children on the donkey, got weaker and weaker. He cried constantly, clutching at his side. There was not enough food. On the fourth day, Mohammed struggled off the donkey and fell onto the sand.
WORLD
May 17, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Barefoot and half-naked, Hamesa Adam carried two sons on her back for six days across the searing Sudanese desert. Two other children, missing their dead father, walked barefoot, and two more rode a donkey. But 6-year-old Mohammed, one of the children on the donkey, got weaker and weaker. He cried constantly, clutching at his side. There was not enough food. On the fourth day, Mohammed struggled off the donkey and fell onto the sand.
WORLD
June 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The chief prosecutor for the International Criminal Court has charged that "the whole state apparatus" of Sudan is implicated in crimes against humanity in the Darfur region, linking the government directly with the so-called janjaweed militia. Luis Moreno-Ocampo says in a report to the U.N. Security Council that he has uncovered evidence showing that "high officials" in the Sudanese government are linked to many horrendous attacks in Darfur. Atrocities include killing, torture and rape of civilians, including young girls, the report says.
WORLD
June 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Sudan rejected demands Saturday to hand over a Cabinet minister and a militia commander indicted on charges of crimes against humanity in Darfur. State Minister of Information Kamal Obeid was responding to a new call by the International Criminal Court prosecutor for Sudan to hand over Ahmad Harun, a Cabinet minister, and Ali Kushayb, a militia commander. Both are accused of organizing a system to recruit, fund, arm and command a militia that terrorized villages in Darfur.
OPINION
October 13, 2007
Re "The Darfur deception," Opinion, Oct. 7 David Rieff seems primarily to explain how he disagrees with the names of such humanitarian groups as Save Darfur and the U.S. Holocaust Museum. Yes, these titles evoke emotional responses. Regardless of how he feels about these names, the situation in Darfur is unacceptable, and the international community needs to put pressure on the Sudanese government to do something about it.
WORLD
July 20, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Women and girls in the Darfur region of western Sudan have been systematically raped by rampaging Arab militias, according to a report released Monday by the human rights group Amnesty International. Victims and witnesses described how members of the militias, known as janjaweed, sang as they raped women and girls as young as 8, broke women's legs to prevent their escape and raped or brutally killed pregnant women.
OPINION
November 13, 2008 | David Scheffer, David Scheffer, the U.S. ambassador at large for war crimes issues from 1997 to 2001, is a law professor and director of the Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern University School of Law.
People hear the word "genocide" and think of 6 million Jews killed by the Nazis during the Holocaust or the estimated 800,000 mostly Tutsis slaughtered in Rwanda. They do not imagine that rape can be so well planned and done on such a mass scale as to wipe out much of an ethnic group just as thoroughly, if more slowly, than large-scale murder.
OPINION
April 14, 2005 | MAX BOOT, Max Boot is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.
To anyone who didn't know better, it might seem that the world is finally getting serious about stopping the genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan, which over the last two years has claimed at least 300,000 lives and displaced at least 2 million people. After months of huffing and puffing, the U.N. Security Council finally agreed to freeze the assets of war crimes suspects, impose a travel ban on them and refer them for trial to the International Criminal Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2008 | Stephanie Hanson, Special to The Times
MOST Americans have heard of Darfur. Some know that it's in western Sudan, that the U. S. has called the crisis there a genocide, and that the United Nations has authorized a peacekeeping force. Yet few understand the roots of the conflict, what is happening on the ground, or what it would take to enable millions of displaced Darfuris to return to their homes.
OPINION
October 7, 2007 | David Rieff, David Rieff is the author of many books, including "At the Point of a Gun: Democratic Dreams and Armed Intervention" and "A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis."
The Sept. 29 killing of 10 African Union peacekeepers in south Darfur by a splinter faction of one of the main anti-Sudanese government insurgent groups was shocking -- but especially so to those who have only followed the Darfur tragedy through the lens of activist, pro-interventionist groups such as Save Darfur or institutions such as the U.S. Holocaust Museum, which label the crisis a genocide.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|