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Janos Kadar

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May 9, 1989
Janos Kadar, 76, who ruled Hungary from the Soviets' crushing of the 1956 uprising until his ouster last May as Communist Party leader, was removed as the party's president and expelled from the Central Committee. Hungarian radio said the ailing president was removed at a closed session of the 118-member Central Committee after a report on the deterioration of his health, both physical and mental. Kadar, once hailed as the most liberal Communist leader in Eastern Europe, had become a major embarrassment to the party, which has embarked on far-reaching reforms.
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July 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former leader Janos Kadar will be buried July 14, a day after President Bush ends his visit to Hungary, state radio reported Friday. The funeral for Kadar, who died Thursday, comes less than one month after an elaborate reburial ceremony for Imre Nagy, the leader of the failed 1956 uprising who was executed on charges of high treason under Kadar's leadership in 1958. Kadar will be interred at the Imre Mezoe cemetery in Budapest, where senior communist leaders traditionally are buried.
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NEWS
July 7, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Janos Kadar, who was installed by the Kremlin to suppress the Hungarian revolution in 1956 and presided over the Communist regime in Budapest for 32 years, died Thursday at the age of 77. His death, in a Budapest hospital of pneumonia and the complications of old age, came 14 months after he was ousted as party leader and a few weeks after he was stripped of his last--and largely ceremonial--post as party president. His passing marks the end of a political era in Hungary.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
In front of the neo-Gothic Parliament Building where Janos Kadar reigned as Hungary's leader for 32 years, a young art student struggled Thursday to express her mixed emotions about the death of the one-time Communist boss. "Kadar called in the Soviet army in '56, and I hate him for that," said Anna Lendyel, 22. "But it was a result of him that we could live a better life, and so I can feel some sorrow for him now."
NEWS
November 1, 1985 | Associated Press
Hungarian Communist Party chief Janos Kadar arrived Thursday for a three-day official visit at the invitation of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | From Reuters
Hungarian Communist Party leader Janos Kadar arrived in China on Saturday, his first visit here in 30 years.
NEWS
July 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former leader Janos Kadar will be buried July 14, a day after President Bush ends his visit to Hungary, state radio reported Friday. The funeral for Kadar, who died Thursday, comes less than one month after an elaborate reburial ceremony for Imre Nagy, the leader of the failed 1956 uprising who was executed on charges of high treason under Kadar's leadership in 1958. Kadar will be interred at the Imre Mezoe cemetery in Budapest, where senior communist leaders traditionally are buried.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
This country's reform Communists won a decisive battle against conservatives Saturday when the party, in an unprecedented move, named prominent economist and reformer Rezso Nyers as the new Communist Party chairman and appointed a four-man team to steer party politics until the next Communist congress in October, Hungarian Radio reported. The decision effectively strips General Secretary Karoly Grosz, 58, of much of his power and places Hungary's leadership in the hands of a reform-minded majority that says it wants to transform Hungary into a socialist democracy.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | From the Washington Post
Premier Karoly Grosz, campaigning to replace Janos Kadar as Hungary's Communist leader, told a party conference Saturday he favored a "renewal" of one-party rule that would "get rid of ideological prejudices" yet incorporate features of the Western multiparty system.
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Communist Party leader Janos Kadar called Friday for political reforms and a rejuvenation of Hungary's leadership in a 50-minute speech that gave no hint if he was about to relinquish power after more than 31 years. But he said the party would not give way to "aspirations violating socialist order" and must prevent people from being influenced by "sectarian, dogmatic and revisionist views." One Western diplomat summed up Kadar's arguments as: "We want more democracy, but will stamp it out."
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Janos Kadar, who was installed by the Kremlin to suppress the Hungarian revolution in 1956 and presided over the Communist regime in Budapest for 32 years, died Thursday at the age of 77. His death, in a Budapest hospital of pneumonia and the complications of old age, came 14 months after he was ousted as party leader and a few weeks after he was stripped of his last--and largely ceremonial--post as party president. His passing marks the end of a political era in Hungary.
NEWS
July 5, 1989
The health of former Hungarian Communist Party leader Janos Kadar, who was admitted to a hospital Monday with pneumonia, has deteriorated, and he could die within days, party officials said. "His state of health is critical," party spokesman Emil Kimmel quoted doctors as saying. "He could die within half an hour or two days," another party source said. Kadar was installed as Hungarian leader after a Soviet-led invasion crushed a 1956 uprising.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
This country's reform Communists won a decisive battle against conservatives Saturday when the party, in an unprecedented move, named prominent economist and reformer Rezso Nyers as the new Communist Party chairman and appointed a four-man team to steer party politics until the next Communist congress in October, Hungarian Radio reported. The decision effectively strips General Secretary Karoly Grosz, 58, of much of his power and places Hungary's leadership in the hands of a reform-minded majority that says it wants to transform Hungary into a socialist democracy.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Janos Kadar's last stand was the spectacle of an old Communist holding out to the end. The aging Hungarian leader's hands fluttered through the mussed pages of his last speech, his place lost. He rambled on, falling back on murky parables and childhood memories of village sweet shops. The speech that was designed as a last defense turned out to be the final unraveling of his rule.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | Associated Press
Janos Kadar, leader of Hungary's Communist Party since 1956, was replaced Sunday by Premier Karoly Grosz in a sweeping reshuffle that brought outspoken reformers into the ruling elite. Kadar also left the ruling Politburo and was given the largely ceremonial post of party president, in changes announced at the end of a three-day national party conference.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | From the Washington Post
Premier Karoly Grosz, campaigning to replace Janos Kadar as Hungary's Communist leader, told a party conference Saturday he favored a "renewal" of one-party rule that would "get rid of ideological prejudices" yet incorporate features of the Western multiparty system.
NEWS
September 26, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The Kremlin issued a mixed set of signals Wednesday to its East European partners, indicating that it accepts the need for diversity among them based on "national peculiarities" but warning that political and economic reforms must stay within ideological bounds defined by the Soviet Union. The message came in a report by the official Tass news agency on two days of meetings between Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Hungary's Communist Party chief, Janos Kadar.
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Communist Party leader Janos Kadar called Friday for political reforms and a rejuvenation of Hungary's leadership in a 50-minute speech that gave no hint if he was about to relinquish power after more than 31 years. But he said the party would not give way to "aspirations violating socialist order" and must prevent people from being influenced by "sectarian, dogmatic and revisionist views." One Western diplomat summed up Kadar's arguments as: "We want more democracy, but will stamp it out."
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