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Janos Vargha

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August 13, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
One cool spring day in 1980, Janos Vargha, a biologist-turned-journalist, visited a village on the Danube and was asked a question that would alter politics in Hungary forever. Vargha, 44, had been sent to report on pristine wetlands along the river's banks. But the townspeople had a more pressing topic on their minds. "What about the dam?" they asked Vargha, clustering around him anxiously. "What dam?" he responded. Vargha soon found out.
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NEWS
August 13, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
One cool spring day in 1980, Janos Vargha, a biologist-turned-journalist, visited a village on the Danube and was asked a question that would alter politics in Hungary forever. Vargha, 44, had been sent to report on pristine wetlands along the river's banks. But the townspeople had a more pressing topic on their minds. "What about the dam?" they asked Vargha, clustering around him anxiously. "What dam?" he responded. Vargha soon found out.
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NEWS
December 1, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vapor lights searing through the fog cast an eerie primrose haze over Gabcikovo's sprawl of concrete, machinery and mud. Idle high-voltage wires sag from giant steel lattices that look like skeletons in the mist. Dirt-encrusted police cars with steamy windows guard entrances to the site--a 20-mile-long eyesore built in defiance of man and nature. The scene at Gabcikovo, home of a massive and much-maligned waterworks, is more an international incident than a feat of engineering.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slovaks love the Danube River so much, the joke goes, that they decided to have another. The problem is that Central Europe's greatest waterway may not survive the sibling rivalry. The Danube River--the stuff of Austrian waltzes, Hungarian ballads and folk tales from the Black Forest to the Black Sea--has met its modern match in this erstwhile farming town about 30 miles downstream from Bratislava, the Slovak capital.
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