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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By David Ng
He isn't completely deaf. He didn't really compose his own music. And now he's sorry for lying about it. Mamoru Samuragochi, the composer who was once popularly referred to as the Beethoven of Japan, appeared at a news conference in Tokyo on Friday and apologized for deceiving the public. "I have caused a great deal of trouble with my lies for everyone, including those people who bought my CDs and came to my concerts," he said, according to a report from Reuters. GRAPHIC: Highest-earning conductors In February, it was revealed that Samuragochi had employed a ghost writer to compose his symphonies and other music, and that his claims to being totally deaf weren't true.
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SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Chris Foster
It is not unusual to find coaches from other schools visiting UCLA practices. It is a little different when one comes from halfway around the world to be there. Daisuke Nishimura , head coach at Kyoto University, and one of his assistants traveled to Los Angeles last week to watch spring practices as a guest of offensive coordinator Noel Mazzone . The two met last summer, when Mazzone was in Japan doing football clinics with a group of coaches. "I love the passion for it," Mazzone said.
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WORLD
July 31, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. House passed a nonbinding resolution urging Japan to apologize for coercing thousands of women into working as sex slaves for its World War II military. Officials in Tokyo say their country's leaders have apologized repeatedly, but the resolution's supporters say Japan has never fully assumed responsibility. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe caused anger in March when he said there was no evidence that the women had been coerced. Lawmakers want an apology similar to the one the U.S.
SCIENCE
March 14, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan and Monte Morin
The Japanese research institution at the center of a growing controversy over a new type of stem cells said Friday that its investigation of four scientists has confirmed two instances of "inappropriate" behavior but that neither case was severe enough to be considered intentional misconduct or outright fabrication of data. An investigative committee at RIKEN, which is funded primarily by the Japanese government, has been looking into charges that two high-profile papers published in January in the journal Nature included plagiarized material, duplicate photos and doctored figures.
SPORTS
February 19, 1998 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old wounds, physical and spiritual, healed long ago. When Lou Zamperini returned to Japan recently, it was in the spirit of forgiveness and reconciliation. If any American during World War II had earned the right to hate, it was Louis Silvie Zamperini. Once one of America's best track and field athletes, he was beaten almost daily for 2 1/2 years in Japanese prisoner-of-war camps and fed a near-starvation diet.
WORLD
November 9, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Photos of the teenager's corpse show a deep cut on his right arm, horrific bruising on his neck and chest. His face is swollen and covered with cuts. A silhouette of violence runs from the corner of his left eye over the cheekbone to his jaw, and his legs are pocked with small burns the size of a lighted cigarette. But police in Japan's Aichi prefecture saw something else when they looked at the body of Takashi Saito, a 17-year-old sumo wrestler who arrived at a hospital in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2011
'Big in Japan,' featuring Yellow Magic Orchestra, Cibo Matto, Buffalo Daughter, Towa Tei, others Where: Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave. When: 7 p.m. Sunday Price: $12-$134 Info: http://www.hollywoodbowl.com
BUSINESS
January 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Car Production Drops: After three straight years of record production, Japan's car assembly lines were reined in last year by a slow economy, weak demand at home and sagging exports. Japan's domestic vehicle output in calendar 1991 dropped 1.8% from the 1990 record to 13,245,432, the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Assn. said. Sluggish domestic demand because of a stagnant economy was the main factor dragging down car output.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By David Ng
He isn't completely deaf. He didn't really compose his own music. And now he's sorry for lying about it. Mamoru Samuragochi, the composer who was once popularly referred to as the Beethoven of Japan, appeared at a news conference in Tokyo on Friday and apologized for deceiving the public. "I have caused a great deal of trouble with my lies for everyone, including those people who bought my CDs and came to my concerts," he said, according to a report from Reuters. GRAPHIC: Highest-earning conductors In February, it was revealed that Samuragochi had employed a ghost writer to compose his symphonies and other music, and that his claims to being totally deaf weren't true.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The still-hot "Frozen" has joined the billion-dollar box-office club.  Disney's animated fairy tale musical is expected to pass $1 billion in worldwide ticket sales on Sunday, according to studio estimates.   "Frozen," which was released wide in the United States and Canada in late November, has generated $388.7 million in box-office revenue from those two countries, while overseas sales have reached $611.5 million.  PHOTOS: Movie scenes from Disney's 'Frozen' The long-running picture is nominated for two Oscars, which air Sunday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Meg James
Less than three years after launching a leading online video subscription service in Japan, Hulu has decided to bow out of the country. Santa Monica-based Hulu has agreed to sell its Hulu Japan subscription service to Japan's Nippon Television Network Corp., the companies announced late Thursday. "We have now reached a point in the growth of the business in Japan where we feel the best path forward is to sell the company to a strategic buyer," Hulu Chief Executive Mike Hopkins wrote in a blog post announcing the divestiture of one of the company's most ambitious projects.
SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
SOCHI, Russia - About 15 months ago, when the Grand Prix Final was a test event for Sochi's new Iceberg Skating Palace, Brian Orser and the young Japanese figure skater he had been coaching for only a few months, Yuzuru Hanyu, went for a walk along the Black Sea. "We started talking about the Sochi Games, and he just blurted out, 'I want to win that Olympics, and I want to win the next one,' " Orser recalled. When Hanyu accomplished the first Friday, he treated what some would be celebrating as the achievement of a lifetime with a maturity, humility and sensitivity that belied his 19 years.
SPORTS
February 12, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
SOCHI, Russia - Two Canadian men could sweep the medals in men's figure skating. That apparent mathematical impossibility adds up because Canadian skater Patrick Chan is the favorite and Canadian coach Brian Orser, a two-time Olympic silver medalist, guides two of the other leading contenders, Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan and Javier Fernandez of Spain. A victory by any of those three would produce the first men's figure skating gold medal for his country - in Fernandez's case, any medal would be a figure skating first for Spain.
WORLD
February 8, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir Putin and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe continued their quiet negotiations Saturday to bring an end to their nations' World War II dispute over four Pacific islands, a disagreement that has hampered relations between the two nations for nearly 70 years. Amidst shifting diplomatic dynamics in the Asian Pacific region, Putin and Abe met on the fringes of the Winter Olympic Games in the southern Russian resort of Sochi to discuss improving trade ties and how to resolve conflicting sovereignty claims to the islands.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
Travelers with minimum time will get maximum exposure to some of Japan's and China's highlights with a 10-day excursion offered by Pacific Delight Tours. The tour begins with a three-night stay in Tokyo at the New Otani Garden Tower Hotel. While in the capital, participants will visit the Meiji Shrine; the Imperial Palace, the residence of the Japanese emperor; and the Ginza, the city's frenetic shopping district. A drive through Kanagawa Prefecture will take visitors to Mt. Fuji, where they will stop halfway up the mountain to take in the views, and to Lake Ashi for a tranquil cruise.
WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Despite criticism from conservationists and some prominent global figures, Japan carried out its annual capture and killing of bottlenose dolphin Tuesday after trapping about 250 of the engaging mammals in a small and infamous south-central cove. Critics of the dolphin hunt and drive this year included Japanese music legend Yoko Ono and the U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy. "Deeply concerned by inhumaneness of drive hunt dolphin killing," Kennedy, the recently arrived U.S. envoy and daughter of John F. Kennedy, tweeted last week , adding that the U.S. government opposes such forms of fishery.
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