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NEWS
July 22, 1996 | LESLIE HELM and GALE EISENSTODT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One afternoon last October, Akio Tanii staggered into his laboratory at the agricultural experiment station outside this small farming village. He was bleary-eyed and distraught. His colleagues were relieved to see him safe because his family had reported him missing overnight and Tanii had been under great stress. The 53-year-old scientist was sent home to rest. Once there, he grew short of breath and fell seriously ill. He was rushed by ambulance to the hospital, where he died that night.
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NEWS
September 12, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan reacted with fear and disbelief Tuesday to reports that the nation had discovered its first suspected case of "mad cow" disease. Reluctant to take any chances, Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea and the Philippines quickly announced bans on Japanese beef and beef products. "Mad-Cow Disease Could Spread Nationwide," screamed the headline in one Japanese newspaper. "First Time in Japan," warned another.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's agriculture minister said Thursday that he is prepared to resign, if necessary, rather than lift his country's ban on rice imports as part of a round of multilateral trade negotiations that end in December. Speaking at the Japan National Press Club, Tomio Yamamoto also rejected an American demand that Japan end its subsidies to farmers. He said he is "resolved to assume responsibility" if agricultural negotiations in the so-called Uruguay Round of trade talks "fail to go smoothly."
BUSINESS
March 14, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity the "transgenic" tomato. It has become a marketing disaster on both sides of the Pacific, and a cautionary tale for Japanese biotechnology. It began life in a California laboratory as a miracle product, a tomato bioengineered to be tasty but slow to spoil. It was the first gene-spliced food to win approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. And in 1994, when Kirin Brewery Co., Japan's top beer maker, acquired the Japanese rights to the Flavr-Savr tomato from Calgene Inc.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan on Monday again rebuffed a plea that it remove its ban on rice imports, but Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter predicted that it would agree to do so before year-end. "Rice may be an item of interest to the United States, but it is a matter of life and death to Japan," Agriculture Minister Tomio Yamamoto told Yeutter, ruling out even partial liberalization.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Their names were Fuji, Judo, Mazda and Ryusho. Before they died of old age years ago, they left behind a genetic legacy worth millions of dollars for cattle breeder Don Lively, one that the Japanese contend is a stolen national treasure. The legacy is semen. The four Japanese bulls that provided it were brought to the United States in a shroud of secrecy 14 years ago. Some people say the semen is a rare commodity that could revolutionize the beef industry in both countries.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time ever, shoppers in America now can purchase a plump, pink piece of history--an apple grown in Japan. But the arrival here last week of high-priced Fuji apples from Aomori prefecture, the preeminent apple-growing region in northern Japan, drew little attention outside of the local Asian-language media.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Rice is the Japanese culture that has lasted for several thousand years. It is the Japanese people themselves," Tomio Yamamoto, Japan's new agriculture minister, declared as he took over his job. Rice, however, is no longer the culture it once was. Indeed, Japanese are eating less of it every year. Farmers themselves are cutting consumption even faster than city dwellers. Not even 15 years of campaigns to promote rice consumption have halted the decline.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could worsen trade tensions and affect tens of millions of dollars in California exports, Japan on Thursday announced a sudden change in its rice policy aimed at further shielding inefficient farmers from outside competition. Midway through a seven-year global trade agreement, Japanese bureaucrats decided to switch to a tariff system that will effectively lower its rice imports by as much as 10% annually while setting the stage for a tax as high as 1,000%.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1993 | From Times staff and wire reports
Unseasonably cold, wet weather is expected to damage Japan's 1993 rice crop and could force the government to slaughter a sacred cow--its ban on foreign rice imports. That could mean at least temporary gains for California rice growers. The Agriculture Ministry has forecast that the 1993 rice harvest would fall to 9.6 million metric tons from an average annual yield of 10.3 million tons, a Japanese newspaper reported.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could worsen trade tensions and affect tens of millions of dollars in California exports, Japan on Thursday announced a sudden change in its rice policy aimed at further shielding inefficient farmers from outside competition. Midway through a seven-year global trade agreement, Japanese bureaucrats decided to switch to a tariff system that will effectively lower its rice imports by as much as 10% annually while setting the stage for a tax as high as 1,000%.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international trade body has ruled that Japan improperly impedes the entry of foreign-grown apples, a finding that could mean $100 million in new business for California and other West Coast fruit farmers. The Geneva-based World Trade Organization concluded this week that Tokyo's costly, time-consuming apple-testing regulations lack scientific merit and should be disbanded. Japan has long frustrated foreign farmers with its complex inspection, fumigation, quarantine and handling regulations.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
It turns out Washington state's 24-year battle to get its apples into Japan was the easy part. Now farmers are trying to find a way to get Japanese consumers to buy the fruit. About 803 tons of American apples passed through customs from December to March, down from 8,497 tons the previous season, according to figures from Japan's Finance Ministry.
NEWS
July 22, 1996 | LESLIE HELM and GALE EISENSTODT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One afternoon last October, Akio Tanii staggered into his laboratory at the agricultural experiment station outside this small farming village. He was bleary-eyed and distraught. His colleagues were relieved to see him safe because his family had reported him missing overnight and Tanii had been under great stress. The 53-year-old scientist was sent home to rest. Once there, he grew short of breath and fell seriously ill. He was rushed by ambulance to the hospital, where he died that night.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time ever, shoppers in America now can purchase a plump, pink piece of history--an apple grown in Japan. But the arrival here last week of high-priced Fuji apples from Aomori prefecture, the preeminent apple-growing region in northern Japan, drew little attention outside of the local Asian-language media.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vegetables are withering on the vine, but rice is thriving. Sales are booming, but factories are beginning to cut back or halt production. It's all because of a heat wave that has been blessing and plaguing Japan all summer--and which shows no signs of letting up.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Cabinet OKs Rice Imports Stand: The Cabinet approved a report that urged Japan to continue its ban on rice imports, despite pressure in international trade talks. The report by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries said Japan "must remain self-sufficient in rice." Negotiators in the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade talks are considering a proposal that would convert all agricultural import bans to tariffs. "Comprehensive tariffication . . .
BUSINESS
June 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Parallel Purchase of Foreign, Domestic Rice to End: As of late July, the Japanese Agriculture Ministry will no longer require that domestic rice be sold with imported rice, Nikkei English News reported Friday. The policy mandating parallel purchasing of foreign and Japanese rice will expire when sales of this year's crop commence late next month, the report said.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan strongly hinted today that it will agree this week to open its rice market somewhat to foreign suppliers, which would remove a key obstacle in worldwide trade negotiations. Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa and other leaders seemed to be leaning toward accepting a compromise proposed by a subgroup of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. It calls for Japan to accept imports for at least 4% of its rice market beginning in 1995, increasing to 8% over six years.
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