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BUSINESS
September 11, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed said Monday that Japan Air Lines will be the first customer for its new aircraft maintenance center in San Bernardino and will make an equity investment of several million dollars into the Lockheed subsidiary doing the work. Under a memorandum of understanding, JAL will take roughly a 10% equity position in the Lockheed Commercial Aircraft Center Inc.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed said Monday that Japan Air Lines will be the first customer for its new aircraft maintenance center in San Bernardino and will make an equity investment of several million dollars into the Lockheed subsidiary doing the work. Under a memorandum of understanding, JAL will take roughly a 10% equity position in the Lockheed Commercial Aircraft Center Inc.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1986
The carrier cited losses stemming from the crash of a Boeing 747 jetliner in which 520 persons were killed for omitting its dividend for fiscal 1985 ending this month. The Japanese national flag carrier paid 40 yen a share in fiscal 1984, then worth about 60 cents. A combination of soaring maintenance review costs and declining passenger traffic after the crash contributed to the airline's decision, the statement said. JAL is scheduled to release its earnings results in May.
NEWS
September 14, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
An inspection of 69 Boeing 747 jets operated by Japanese companies found broken bolts, loose bolt fixtures and damaged rivets in the tail sections of 26 of the aircraft, a Transport Ministry official said Friday. None of the faults were serious enough to be a threat to safety. The inspections were ordered after a Japan Air Lines Boeing 747-SR crashed Aug. 12, killing all but four of the 524 people aboard in the worst single-plane disaster in aviation history.
OPINION
April 7, 1985
Conrad's cartoon contains a big ironic twist in it. The bombers dropping the Japanese import cars are none other than multimillion-dollar Boeing 747s--surely each one costing the equivalent of many hundreds if not thousands of small Japanese cars. And if I'm not mistaken all of Japan Air Line's international fleet are Boeings and probably most of their domestic fleet also are Boeings. So they do indeed import something. Maybe we have been trying to get them to buy products they really do not need at the present--like shoes, electronics, manufactured products, and paper goods.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
FAA Suspends JAL License to Work on U.S. Aircraft: Citing concerns about Japan Air Line's repair procedures, the carrier said the Federal Aviation Administration has temporarily suspended JAL's license to do maintenance work on U.S.-owned aircraft. JAL spokesman Shinichi Tajima would not comment on specific concerns raised by the FAA, but he said the airline believes it was meeting the FAA repair standards.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1986
The carrier cited losses stemming from the crash of a Boeing 747 jetliner in which 520 persons were killed for omitting its dividend for fiscal 1985 ending this month. The Japanese national flag carrier paid 40 yen a share in fiscal 1984, then worth about 60 cents. A combination of soaring maintenance review costs and declining passenger traffic after the crash contributed to the airline's decision, the statement said. JAL is scheduled to release its earnings results in May.
NEWS
September 14, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
An inspection of 69 Boeing 747 jets operated by Japanese companies found broken bolts, loose bolt fixtures and damaged rivets in the tail sections of 26 of the aircraft, a Transport Ministry official said Friday. None of the faults were serious enough to be a threat to safety. The inspections were ordered after a Japan Air Lines Boeing 747-SR crashed Aug. 12, killing all but four of the 524 people aboard in the worst single-plane disaster in aviation history.
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