Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Air Lines
IN THE NEWS

Japan Air Lines

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 11, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed said Monday that Japan Air Lines will be the first customer for its new aircraft maintenance center in San Bernardino and will make an equity investment of several million dollars into the Lockheed subsidiary doing the work. Under a memorandum of understanding, JAL will take roughly a 10% equity position in the Lockheed Commercial Aircraft Center Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 12, 2001 | Associated Press
Two of Japan's largest airlines are close to a merger that would create the world's No.6 carrier in terms of annual passenger miles flown, news reports said Sunday. Japan Airlines Inc., the world's eighth-largest airline, and regional carrier Japan Air System Inc. plan to merge their operations under a holding company in the fall of 2002, the Nihon Keizai financial daily reported, without citing sources.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 8, 1985
The National Transportation Safety Board said it has recommended design changes in the Boeing 747 jetliner to prevent further structural breakdowns such as those suspected of causing the Japan Air Lines crash that killed 520 people in August.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2000 | Reuters
Boeing Co. said Japan Airlines Co. has ordered 11 wide-body jets, including eight 777-200ERs and three 767-300ERs, worth a total of $1.6 billion at list prices. Meanwhile, Turkish Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit said his government would negotiate to buy six or seven radar surveillance aircraft from Boeing in a deal industry officials valued at $1.5 billion. Turkey would first negotiate with Boeing, but if no deal was reached, it would consider a competing bid from Raytheon Co., Ecevit said.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
JAL to Drop Seattle-Tokyo Flights: Japan Air Lines said it will suspend service between Seattle and Tokyo on Nov. 1 to save costs. Seattle is a stopover on JAL's Atlanta-Tokyo flight, which will become nonstop, the airline said. It said it will continue to operate cargo charter flights out of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, mainly carrying seasonal produce to Japan.
NEWS
December 2, 1988
Japanese police sought criminal charges against 20 people, including employees of Boeing Co., Japan Air Lines and the Japanese Transport Ministry, after a three-year investigation of the 1985 crash of a Boeing 747 that killed 520 people. Police said the crash resulted from professional negligence in repairing, inspecting and maintaining the plane after it scraped its tail in a hard landing at Osaka in 1978. Boeing said it believes the accident did not involve a criminal act.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1999 | Associated Press
Coffee, tea or cigarette substitute? Beginning today, Tokyo-based Japan Airlines will ban smoking on all international flights--but it will offer passengers an alternative. Those who find smoke-free flying troublesome will receive a little plastic tube in the shape of a cigarette to put in their mouths to help suppress the urge. "It's for oral gratification," airline spokeswoman Irene Jackson said.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a boost for air travel and U.S.-Japan relations, negotiators from the two countries signed a tentative accord Friday that will significantly broaden air access to Japan and other destinations, capping fractious international trade talks that went on for years. The pact will allow several U.S. carriers to expand their operations in Japan by adding flights and creating partnerships with foreign airlines to provide more routes from Japan to other countries.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
FAA Suspends JAL License to Work on U.S. Aircraft: Citing concerns about Japan Air Line's repair procedures, the carrier said the Federal Aviation Administration has temporarily suspended JAL's license to do maintenance work on U.S.-owned aircraft. JAL spokesman Shinichi Tajima would not comment on specific concerns raised by the FAA, but he said the airline believes it was meeting the FAA repair standards.
NEWS
September 17, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japan Air Lines' plan to start hiring contract flight attendants at half the pay of full-status employees has stirred a new controversy here over government intervention in private business. The battle--unusual only in that it has gone public--is not over yet. But signs are pointing to a victory for business. It started in August, just as JAL was about to interview applicants for jobs as contract flight attendants.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S.-Japan dispute over air service rights is heating up as Tokyo seeks changes in what it views as an unfair 1952 agreement and American carriers try to expand Pacific Rim services under the old rules. The latest point of friction comes from a Japan Airlines request to inaugurate a route between the northern city of Sendai and Honolulu beginning last Thursday. The U.S.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Airline's Maintenance to Shift to China: Japan Airlines Co. said it is planning to transfer a portion of the operation to Xiamen in China from Japan in 1996 as part of its effort to cut costs and restore profit. The company said it will acquire 10% of Xiamen Taikoo Aircraft Engineering Co. this month. Xiamen Taikoo is a joint venture between Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd.'s maintenance unit and the Xiamen municipal government. By using the Chinese company, Japan Air expects to save about $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1989 | From United Press International
A jury has awarded $1.5 million to an Italian woman who lost her husband and son 3 1/2 years ago when a Boeing 747 slammed into a mountain in Japan, killing 520 people in the world's worst single-plane accident. The lawsuit by Heidi Moroni and her 18-year-old son, decided Friday, was the first case involving the crash of the Japan Air Lines jetliner to go to trial. Boeing has settled nearly 400 cases out of court.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1993 | From Bloomberg Business News
After 12 years of haggling with American aviation officials, Japan Airlines Co. is once again asking for permission to truck cargo inland from its U.S. gateway airports. The renewed effort by JAL, which filed a request with the Department of Transportation last month, reflects the growing importance of freight business to passenger airlines. With most flight costs linked to passenger traffic, cargoes tucked into the underbellies of airliners represent a steady profit stream.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|