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BUSINESS
November 13, 2001 | KAE INOUE and TIM KELLY, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Skymark Airlines Co., Japan's first discount carrier, said it hopes Japan Airlines Co.'s takeover of Japan Air System Co. will give it more access to high-volume domestic routes. Skymark hopes the merger will give fair opportunities for other airlines to add routes, said spokesman Soemu Kurashige. "We hope the merger won't give consumers disadvantages, such as some routes being more expensive than others."
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BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner operated by Japan Airlines had to return to Boston's Logan International Airport after an indicator light came on in the cockpit. Japan Airlines Co. Flight 7 was bound for Tokyo, but instead made a U-turn over Canada and landed in Boston. “As a standard precautionary measure due to a maintenance message -- fuel pump indicator -- JL007 bound for Tokyo-Narita is returning to Boston Logan for check,” airline spokeswoman Carol Anderson said. FULL COVERAGE: Boeing's troubled Dreamliner The Federal Aviation Administration said the 787 circled in the vicinity of the airport to burn off fuel before landing.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aviation Talks to Resume Soon: The United States and Japan made the agreement to discuss new routes and related issues, a Japanese Transport Ministry official said. Tokyo canceled talks in 1993 to protest a U.S. decision to withhold approval of a new Sendai-Honolulu route for Japan Airlines Co. Washington approved the route in November. Tokyo charges that U.S. airlines take passengers from Japanese carriers by making connecting flights to other Asian and Pacific destinations from Japan.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2001 | KAE INOUE and TIM KELLY, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Skymark Airlines Co., Japan's first discount carrier, said it hopes Japan Airlines Co.'s takeover of Japan Air System Co. will give it more access to high-volume domestic routes. Skymark hopes the merger will give fair opportunities for other airlines to add routes, said spokesman Soemu Kurashige. "We hope the merger won't give consumers disadvantages, such as some routes being more expensive than others."
BUSINESS
May 25, 1993 | From Bloomberg Business News
After 12 years of haggling with American aviation officials, Japan Airlines Co. is once again asking for permission to truck cargo inland from its U.S. gateway airports. The renewed effort by JAL, which filed a request with the Department of Transportation last month, reflects the growing importance of freight business to passenger airlines. With most flight costs linked to passenger traffic, cargoes tucked into the underbellies of airliners represent a steady profit stream.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1993 | From Bloomberg Business News
Japan Airlines Co. said Thursday that it will trim expenses and investments by a total of $1.6 billion to counter the one-two punch of a heavy debt load and declining revenue from international flights. Japan's largest carrier has been expanding its fleet in preparation for a new international airport in Japan, only to get hit by increasing competition for international flights during a global economic slowdown.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner operated by Japan Airlines had to return to Boston's Logan International Airport after an indicator light came on in the cockpit. Japan Airlines Co. Flight 7 was bound for Tokyo, but instead made a U-turn over Canada and landed in Boston. “As a standard precautionary measure due to a maintenance message -- fuel pump indicator -- JL007 bound for Tokyo-Narita is returning to Boston Logan for check,” airline spokeswoman Carol Anderson said. FULL COVERAGE: Boeing's troubled Dreamliner The Federal Aviation Administration said the 787 circled in the vicinity of the airport to burn off fuel before landing.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Four U.S. airlines stepped up to the plate to take advantage of a new market-opening U.S.-Japan aviation agreement. AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, Delta Air Lines Inc., US Airways Group Inc., and Trans World Airlines Inc. all filed requests with the Transportation Department for permission to offer new service to Japan. AMR applied for four new routes, including one between Chicago and Tokyo that the carrier has sought for more than a decade. The U.S.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Boeing Co. has received about $2.2 billion in new orders from two airlines, including the first orders for its new 777-300X model. Japan Airlines Co. will take possession of the first 777-300X by 2004 and seven more by 2008, Boeing said. Boeing did not give a value for the eight-plane order, but based on company list prices it would be worth about $1.5 billion.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Boeing Co.'s planned "sonic cruiser" high-speed plane, aimed at travelers willing to pay a premium for quick flights, isn't winning orders from the world's biggest carriers, which face passengers seeking deeply discounted fares, Business Week said. Executives at carriers including AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, Delta Air Lines Inc., UAL Corp.'s United Airlines, British Airways and Japan Airlines Co. all have said they don't plan on buying the new plane.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aviation Talks to Resume Soon: The United States and Japan made the agreement to discuss new routes and related issues, a Japanese Transport Ministry official said. Tokyo canceled talks in 1993 to protest a U.S. decision to withhold approval of a new Sendai-Honolulu route for Japan Airlines Co. Washington approved the route in November. Tokyo charges that U.S. airlines take passengers from Japanese carriers by making connecting flights to other Asian and Pacific destinations from Japan.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1993 | From Bloomberg Business News
After 12 years of haggling with American aviation officials, Japan Airlines Co. is once again asking for permission to truck cargo inland from its U.S. gateway airports. The renewed effort by JAL, which filed a request with the Department of Transportation last month, reflects the growing importance of freight business to passenger airlines. With most flight costs linked to passenger traffic, cargoes tucked into the underbellies of airliners represent a steady profit stream.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1993 | From Bloomberg Business News
Japan Airlines Co. said Thursday that it will trim expenses and investments by a total of $1.6 billion to counter the one-two punch of a heavy debt load and declining revenue from international flights. Japan's largest carrier has been expanding its fleet in preparation for a new international airport in Japan, only to get hit by increasing competition for international flights during a global economic slowdown.
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