Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan American Society Of Southern California
IN THE NEWS

Japan American Society Of Southern California

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 24, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California charities can expect to see more Japanese corporations loosen their purse strings as the companies realize that their future prosperity may be linked to their ability to give to the communities in which they operate. "Japanese corporate donations will greatly increase in the future" as more Japanese executives learn to participate in community development, Noriyasu Hattori, president of Makita U.S.A. Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 24, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California charities can expect to see more Japanese corporations loosen their purse strings as the companies realize that their future prosperity may be linked to their ability to give to the communities in which they operate. "Japanese corporate donations will greatly increase in the future" as more Japanese executives learn to participate in community development, Noriyasu Hattori, president of Makita U.S.A. Inc.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 5, 1995
A relief fund organized by several local Japanese organizations to help the victims of the Jan. 17 earthquake in Kobe, Japan, has raised $1.18 million. The Kobe Relief Fund was created for victims of the earthquake in which 5,357 people were killed and 210,000 were left homeless. The fund was begun hours after the quake. The money is being distributed through a Kobe-area government agency to earthquake victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1995
Southern Californians who experienced last year's Northridge earthquake surely have been touched in an extraordinary way by the images of death and destruction in Kobe. Rightly, many are impelled to reach across the Pacific to help the victims of Japan's most deadly temblor in seven decades. In 1994 the Japanese extended a hand in our time of need. Japanese companies donated $3 million to victims and relief efforts after the Northridge quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yukiyasu "Yuki" Togo, the former president and chairman of Torrance-based Toyota Motor Sales USA who steered Japanese funds to support Southern California charitable and cultural organizations, including purchasing a million-dollar pipe organ for the Disney Concert Hall now under construction, has died. He was 75. Company officials in Torrance said Togo, who retired in 1993 but remained an advisor to the automobile company, died Saturday in Yokohama, Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1991
Four UC Irvine alumni have been named to the board of directors of the university's alumni association, campus officials said. Appointed to two-year terms were George Sakioka, who handles real estate development and finances for the family's Sakioka Farms in Costa Mesa; Barbara Davidson, UC Irvine's director of arts, lectures and student affairs communications; and Irvine attorneys William Grenner and Richard Derevan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Victor M. Carter, who built a fortune in building supplies and motion pictures and spent much of it in philanthropic efforts in Southern California, has died. He was 94. Carter died Saturday at Century City Hospital of natural causes, said his daughter, Fanya Carter. In 1949, Carter bought an ailing Van Nuys lumber and hardware store called Builders Emporium.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | TIA GINDICK
There's a story that tells a lot about philanthropist-businessman Victor M. Carter. It happened in 1967 when Carter was chairman of the annual United Way fund-raising campaign. First he raised his own donation from $6,000 to $10,000. Then he found that individuals in other cities were giving as much as $25,000. So Carter talked it over with Leonard Firestone, and the two businessmen each upped their donations to $25,000 and persuaded 10 others to do the same.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within a public opinion study that unveiled a great deal of America's concern over U.S.-Japanese economic relations was some advice for any Japanese firm interested in improving its standing in the United States: Forge partnerships with U.S. firms and develop good relations with American communities. Those suggestions were contained in the second part of a two-pronged study sponsored by advertising giant Saatchi & Saatchi, a firm with a number of Japanese corporate clients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman from Reseda, whose family is still living in a house heavily damaged in the Northridge earthquake, brought a carload of clothing, food and special treats to Little Tokyo to be forwarded to victims of last week's deadly Kobe temblor. And Long Beach mail carrier Yamira Ybarra spent her day off with her son, Jonathan, carting the items she had collected during her mail delivery route to Little Tokyo's earthquake relief center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2007 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Walter F. Beran, a businessman whose deep civic involvement and philanthropy reflected his belief that "we must put ourselves in the place of another" if America is to continue to be a productive society, died Saturday of respiratory failure at a nursing home in Los Angeles, his son Jim Beran said. He was 81. For decades Beran worked at Ernst & Whinney, a predecessor of Ernst & Young.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|