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NEWS
April 14, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa declared Monday that failure to enact bills authorizing the dispatch of Japan's armed forces overseas for peacekeeping missions would make Japan look like a "strange" nation to the rest of the world. He also said the deceleration of Japan's economy is at an end and predicted that statistics for the January-March period, when announced in June, will show that an upward climb has begun.
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NEWS
March 7, 2001 | Reuters
A former Japanese naval officer, arrested last year in Japan's biggest spy scandal in two decades, was handed a 10-month jail sentence today for passing military secrets to Russia, a court official said. Shigehiro Hagisaki, 38, a former lieutenant commander in the Maritime Self-Defense Force, was arrested in September on suspicion of giving classified documents to a Russian attache.
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NEWS
December 7, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here, by a grove of cherry trees whose thick, dark canopy trembles with a flock of brilliantly white doves, stands the altar of Japanese militarism. The spirits of foot soldiers and generals, cannon fodder and war criminals are enshrined as deities in this place and rest eternally, without judgment, blame or sin. At Yasukuni Jinja, the "Shrine of the Nation at Peace," stoop-backed widows pray for the repose of their husbands who fell in Manchuria.
NEWS
September 9, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Police on Friday arrested a senior Japanese naval officer suspected of passing secrets to a Russian Embassy official--a move that comes just three days after Japan and Russia pledged to cooperate in regional security. The 38-year-old officer, a researcher at Japan's National Institute for Defense Studies, is accused of handing over classified documents to a Russian military attache in Tokyo on several occasions, said Masatoshi Konomi, a spokesman for the Tokyo Metropolitan Police.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
In a major setback for advocates of stronger separation of religion and state in Japan, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday against a Christian woman who sued the government for violating her rights by enshrining her husband in a Shinto ceremony after he died on military duty. The high court overturned two lower-court rulings that the "personal religious rights" of the widow, Yasuko Nakaya, 54, had been violated by Self-Defense Forces officials who helped in the enshrinement over her objections.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through three generations, the dead Japanese soldier's diary remained tucked away in Albert Elsbernd's bottom desk drawer, a mysterious journal in a complicated foreign script, a former enemy's thoughts on a war waged half a century ago. Picked up in a battle-scarred building in the Philippines in 1945, brought home to a 14-year-old Elsbernd by a returning U. S. soldier, the indecipherable chronicle was treasured as a young boy's war memento.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
The Japanese Striking Force The Japanese carrier striking task force that attacked Pearl Harbor set sail from the Kuril Islands on Nov. 26. It was made up of six aircraft carriers, two battleships and had a support force of nine destroyers, one light cruiser, two heavy cruisers and eight tankers. Three I-class submarines were positioned in front of the task force to act as scouts. U.S. Ships That Missed the Attack Many ships of the U.S. fleet were not present at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The diminutive military commander who devised the operational plan for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor would many years later win a U.S. decoration for his contributions to American security. But he never apologized for his World War II role and contended that the only problem with the Pearl Harbor raid was that Japan failed to follow it up aggressively enough. Proud and ramrod-straight at 5 feet 3 inches and 103 pounds, sharp-featured Minoru Genda remained devoted to his career to the end.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Admitting that its pre-1945 government recruited women from Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, the Philippines and Indonesia to provide sex for Japanese soldiers, Japan on Monday officially expressed its "remorse" for the "indescribable pain and suffering" of those it euphemistically called "comfort women." Koichi Kato, chief Cabinet secretary, made the long-awaited announcement that concluded a seven-month investigation by the government.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | Reuters
A former Japanese naval officer, arrested last year in Japan's biggest spy scandal in two decades, was handed a 10-month jail sentence today for passing military secrets to Russia, a court official said. Shigehiro Hagisaki, 38, a former lieutenant commander in the Maritime Self-Defense Force, was arrested in September on suspicion of giving classified documents to a Russian attache.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hangar at Van Nuys Airport sits a once-airborne connection to World War II. The war bird conjures up images of machine-gun fire, shot up planes dueling in the skies and kamikazes crashing into the sea. Aviation experts say only half a dozen Japanese-made Mitsubishi Zeros are left and one of them, a 1943 model, is being repaired by airplane mechanic Peter Regina.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hangar at Van Nuys Airport, a relic of World War II conjures up images of machine gun fire, shot-up planes smashing into U.S. warships and kamikaze pilots crashing into the sea. Aviation experts say only half a dozen Japanese-made Mitsubishi Zeros are left, and one of them, a 1943 model, is being repaired by airplane mechanic Peter Regina in Van Nuys.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Don't look now but Japan is developing a more independent military capability just in case its alliance with the United States should someday fall apart. That is the blunt conclusion drawn by the U.S. intelligence community in two reports over the last three months. These soberly written studies say that Japan is now "hedging its bets" by strengthening its security ties to the United States while preparing for a time when Japan may stand on its own.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
After tracking Nazi war criminals for 17 years, the Justice Department took its first action against Japanese army veterans suspected of medically experimenting on prisoners and operating forced sex camps during World War II. Sixteen men who served in the Imperial Army were barred from ever entering the United States.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | Associated Press
A senior officer of the Japanese navy apologized in person Thursday to the wife of an American pilot whose warplane was accidentally shot down by a Japanese destroyer. Vice Adm. Yasuki Sugiyama, commander of air forces for Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Forces, expressed his regrets to Carol Royster at the U.S. military base in Atsugi, where her husband is stationed. The Japanese vessel Yugiri rescued Lt. Cmdr. William Royster and his bombardier-navigator, Lt.
NEWS
June 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
Dazed, bleeding and battered after punching out of his crippled attack bomber, Lt. Cmdr. William Royster had only one thought as his parachute carried him downward toward the blue Pacific. "He couldn't believe he was alive," Royster's wife, Carol, said after he called her Wednesday at their home in Japan from his hospital bed aboard the aircraft carrier Independence. Royster and his bombardier-navigator, Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hangar at Van Nuys Airport sits a once-airborne connection to World War II. The war bird conjures up images of machine-gun fire, shot up planes dueling in the skies and kamikazes crashing into the sea. Aviation experts say only half a dozen Japanese-made Mitsubishi Zeros are left and one of them, a 1943 model, is being repaired by airplane mechanic Peter Regina.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
After tracking Nazi war criminals for 17 years, the Justice Department took its first action against Japanese army veterans suspected of medically experimenting on prisoners and operating forced sex camps during World War II. Sixteen men who served in the Imperial Army were barred from ever entering the United States.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japanese destroyer accidentally shot down a U.S. bomber in the Pacific during joint military exercises Monday, and naval forces of both nations temporarily suspended all live-fire exercises as they sought an explanation for the incident. The aircraft's two crew members ejected safely and were rescued after a U.S.
NEWS
May 14, 1996 | From Reuters
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto won agreement Monday from his coalition partners to carry out a military review aimed at breaking long-standing taboos on action not directly involving the country's defense. The proposal for the review, which will focus on the so-called 1978 Guidelines for Japan-U.S. Defense Cooperation, could have brought down Hashimoto's government if the coalition partners had not agreed to it.
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