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February 2, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Like most people, I've long regarded the Abstract Expressionist painting done in San Francisco in the decade after World War II to have been a quick, sometimes deft response to extraordinary artistic developments principally being generated in New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011 | Daina Beth Solomon
A few years before he died in 1988, artist Isamu Noguchi established a 24,000-square-foot museum to house representative samples of his seven-decade-long career: paintings, ceramics, furniture, sculptures, landscaping designs and set designs. Noguchi opted to locate the museum in his adopted hometown, New York City. Here on the West Coast, Southern Californians must rely on individual installations to view Noguchi's work. The Laguna Art Museum offers a chance to see a different perspective on Noguchi's accomplishments with "Noguchi: California Legacy," which devotes three compact galleries to a sampling of his work from 1979 to 1986.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The multimillion-dollar artworks snapped up by Japanese collectors at highly publicized auctions are only "a tiny, tiny portion of the iceberg" in the Japanese art market, Ikkan Sanada told his audience at the 1989 Artnews World Art Market Conference. A two-day meeting this week at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan offered about 300 participants a tightly packed program on market-related topics ranging from business tips for dealers to "untapped potentials" for collectors. "Inside the Japanese Art Market" was the subject addressed late Thursday afternoon by Sanada, director of Ikkan Art International Inc., a Japanese art advisory service in Manhattan.
TRAVEL
June 6, 1999 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Absolute Asia is offering tourists the chance to visit the home of one of Japan's folk artists and to wander through traditional farming villages in the Japanese alps. "Highlights of Folk Japan," a 12-night tour on various dates throughout the year, emphasizes the country's finest artists, museums, architecture and natural scenery with a combination of group touring and time to explore independently. Guests will visit Tokyo, Hakone, Mt. Fuji, Takayama and Kyoto.
TRAVEL
June 6, 1999 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Absolute Asia is offering tourists the chance to visit the home of one of Japan's folk artists and to wander through traditional farming villages in the Japanese alps. "Highlights of Folk Japan," a 12-night tour on various dates throughout the year, emphasizes the country's finest artists, museums, architecture and natural scenery with a combination of group touring and time to explore independently. Guests will visit Tokyo, Hakone, Mt. Fuji, Takayama and Kyoto.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES
The Japan Folkloric Art Dance Troupe has so refined and prettified whatever authentic sources it can lay claim to that the works the troupe danced Saturday at the Japan America Theatre often seemed like picture post cards of a never-never land. Founded in 1963, the company puts emphasis on ever-smiling faces, colorful costumes, phalanxes of dancers in drill-team precision, genial generalities and speedy resolutions of any hint of dramatic tension.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | CLAYTON JONES, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
As coach of Japan's judo team, Yasuhiro Yamashita knows how to give way to an assailant. After all, that's how one wins in the art of judo, which in Japanese means "gentle way." But the former world champ is not willing to give way when his country's only contribution to Olympic sports is looking less and less like its original self, and Japan is losing its historic dominance in judo.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
In Tokyo one day last summer, Los Angeles independent curator Noriko Fujinami stumbled into a colleague from back home. Curator Judi Freeman of the L.A. County Museum of Art had flown to Japan on business too. The same thing happened to Howard Fox. Last fall the County Museum of Art curator ran into Alexandra Munroe, an independent curator from New York, six times in one week. Freeman and another associate experienced an uncanny number of near-miss meetings.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011 | Daina Beth Solomon
A few years before he died in 1988, artist Isamu Noguchi established a 24,000-square-foot museum to house representative samples of his seven-decade-long career: paintings, ceramics, furniture, sculptures, landscaping designs and set designs. Noguchi opted to locate the museum in his adopted hometown, New York City. Here on the West Coast, Southern Californians must rely on individual installations to view Noguchi's work. The Laguna Art Museum offers a chance to see a different perspective on Noguchi's accomplishments with "Noguchi: California Legacy," which devotes three compact galleries to a sampling of his work from 1979 to 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON
Despite its vibrant Japanese community, Los Angeles has not seen a major exhibition of contemporary art from Japan in living memory. At one time such an oversight might have been explicable, if not forgivable. For years, nobody was certain if the nation produced new art that could be called either Japanese or contemporary.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | CLAYTON JONES, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
As coach of Japan's judo team, Yasuhiro Yamashita knows how to give way to an assailant. After all, that's how one wins in the art of judo, which in Japanese means "gentle way." But the former world champ is not willing to give way when his country's only contribution to Olympic sports is looking less and less like its original self, and Japan is losing its historic dominance in judo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON
Despite its vibrant Japanese community, Los Angeles has not seen a major exhibition of contemporary art from Japan in living memory. At one time such an oversight might have been explicable, if not forgivable. For years, nobody was certain if the nation produced new art that could be called either Japanese or contemporary.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The multimillion-dollar artworks snapped up by Japanese collectors at highly publicized auctions are only "a tiny, tiny portion of the iceberg" in the Japanese art market, Ikkan Sanada told his audience at the 1989 Artnews World Art Market Conference. A two-day meeting this week at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan offered about 300 participants a tightly packed program on market-related topics ranging from business tips for dealers to "untapped potentials" for collectors. "Inside the Japanese Art Market" was the subject addressed late Thursday afternoon by Sanada, director of Ikkan Art International Inc., a Japanese art advisory service in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
In Tokyo one day last summer, Los Angeles independent curator Noriko Fujinami stumbled into a colleague from back home. Curator Judi Freeman of the L.A. County Museum of Art had flown to Japan on business too. The same thing happened to Howard Fox. Last fall the County Museum of Art curator ran into Alexandra Munroe, an independent curator from New York, six times in one week. Freeman and another associate experienced an uncanny number of near-miss meetings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES
The Japan Folkloric Art Dance Troupe has so refined and prettified whatever authentic sources it can lay claim to that the works the troupe danced Saturday at the Japan America Theatre often seemed like picture post cards of a never-never land. Founded in 1963, the company puts emphasis on ever-smiling faces, colorful costumes, phalanxes of dancers in drill-team precision, genial generalities and speedy resolutions of any hint of dramatic tension.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bernstein, Fellini Honored: Conductor Leonard Bernstein and Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini were among artists who received $100,000 each Thursday with their Praemium Imperiale awards, an international prize awarded by the Japan Art Assn. for lifetime achievement in the arts. Other winners were Italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro, Spanish painter Antoni Tapies and Scottish architect James Stirling.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Praemium Prizes: Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman was one of five people named Tuesday to receive a $100,000 Praemium Imperiale prize awarded by the Japan Art Assn. for lifetime achievement. The Oct. 30 awards ceremony also will honor French painter Klossowski de la Balthus, Spanish sculptor Eduard Chillida, Italian architect Gae Aulenti and Austrian musician Gyorgy Ligeti.
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