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NEWS
July 28, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rousing, come-from-behind, five-set victory by the U.S. men's volleyball team Sunday in the opening game of the Summer Olympics became a stunning four-set loss 24 hours later, when the International Volleyball Federation upheld Japan's protest. The federation announced Monday that 20 of its Control Committee's 24 members voted without dissent, after a five-hour meeting, to award the victory to Japan. Three Japanese members and an international federation technical director did not vote.
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SPORTS
September 16, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As early as today, Karl "Tuffy" Rhodes could break a Japanese record of 55 home runs in a season that has stood since 1964. . If he gets half a chance. Frequently when foreign players in Japan get close to a major milestone, pitchers try to keep the title in Japanese hands by refusing to throw within a yard of their bats.
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SPORTS
July 11, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is she just too un-Japanese to represent Japan in the Olympics? That's the question that Suzu Chiba and her supporters have been asking since the outspoken swimmer won her qualifying event and national title but nevertheless was denied a spot on the swimming team that will represent Japan at Sydney. Chiba isn't keeping her frustrations to herself, either, a most un-Japanese thing to do.
SPORTS
July 11, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ichiromania, already at feverish levels, reached a zenith this morning as the All-Star game was broadcast here live. Everyone, it seemed, carried a Walkman or clustered around a television, be it in an office, a restaurant, a town hall or a department store, transfixed by their hero, Ichiro Suzuki, the top vote-getter in the game at Seattle.
SPORTS
August 23, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The opportunity to speak with Sohn Kee Chung is the opportunity to hear a lesson in 20th-Century Korean history, and that is what he gave as he entertained guests at his modern sixth-floor apartment in a middle-class part of the city. Outside, although it was Saturday morning, children who were dressed in uniforms walked with various degrees of enthusiasm toward school for a half-day of studies, and street vendors sold Heinz ketchup, Smuckers jam, Velveeta cheese and other U.S.
SPORTS
June 27, 1992 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel first baseman Alvin Davis saw his past and his future this week, getting the chance to relive his success with the Mariners and a chance to recreate that success in Japan. Davis, unable to regain the swing that brought him 160 home runs and 667 runs batted in with Seattle, was released Friday so that he can join the Kintetsu Buffaloes of the Japanese Pacific League.
SPORTS
March 29, 2000 | By BILL SHAIKIN,
The Chicago Cubs are perfectly capable of losing games by themselves. No sports franchise is more celebrated, in prose and song, for its bumbling and stumbling. But if the Cubs miss out on a playoff berth by a game or two, they might be justified in pointing a finger at major league baseball.
SPORTS
March 30, 2000 |
A sumo wrestler waddled to his seat and Crown Prince Naruhito sat in the Royal Box. Fans snacked on sushi with chopsticks, and some even wore surgical masks. Mike Hampton, however, turned the first major league game played outside North America into a truly wild opening day Wednesday.
SPORTS
February 22, 1997 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Casting a wary eye at the Nagano Winter Olympics, which will end one year from today, the speaker somberly assessed: "If it continues like this, I think the Nagano Games will not be successful." And the speaker was? (a) The president of the Japanese Olympic Committee, inspecting the preparations firsthand. (b) Billy Payne, thinking wishfully.
SPORTS
January 23, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hawaiian-born Akebono, the first foreigner anointed a grand champion in Japan's rarefied world of sumo wrestling, is hanging up his loincloth. Hobbling on bad knees, clad in a gray kimono and dabbing away tears, Akebono on Monday announced that he will retire from the clay ring, where he has spent the last dozen years winning fame and fortune.
SPORTS
January 12, 2001 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The plane had not yet landed when Bill LeSuer noticed the two dozen reporters assembled nearby. Surely they were awaiting the arrival of celebrities. LeSuer had driven to Los Angeles International Airport to pick up two Japanese pitchers arriving for several weeks of physical therapy and conditioning. As the passengers disembarked, LeSuer could barely extend his hand to welcome the pitchers before they were swallowed by the sea of cameras, microphones and note pads.
SPORTS
November 11, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan is in mourning for perhaps its most popular baseball hero ever, Ichiro Suzuki, who appears headed for a spot on the Seattle Mariners' roster. But his departure from Japan could be more significant than simply losing a seven-time batting champion, ace right fielder and national heartthrob. It could presage a major loss in stature for baseball here, if the man who is known by his first name, Ichiro, does well.
SPORTS
July 11, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is she just too un-Japanese to represent Japan in the Olympics? That's the question that Suzu Chiba and her supporters have been asking since the outspoken swimmer won her qualifying event and national title but nevertheless was denied a spot on the swimming team that will represent Japan at Sydney. Chiba isn't keeping her frustrations to herself, either, a most un-Japanese thing to do.
SPORTS
March 30, 2000 |
A sumo wrestler waddled to his seat and Crown Prince Naruhito sat in the Royal Box. Fans snacked on sushi with chopsticks, and some even wore surgical masks. Mike Hampton, however, turned the first major league game played outside North America into a truly wild opening day Wednesday.
SPORTS
March 29, 2000 | By BILL SHAIKIN,
The Chicago Cubs are perfectly capable of losing games by themselves. No sports franchise is more celebrated, in prose and song, for its bumbling and stumbling. But if the Cubs miss out on a playoff berth by a game or two, they might be justified in pointing a finger at major league baseball.
SPORTS
October 12, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How much would an American baseball team offer a 20-year-old rookie center fielder who set a record for reaching base safely in consecutive games, broke the old mark for the most hits--with an average of 1.6 a game--batted around .400 nearly all season and lifted his team into pennant contention? In Japan, the price is $120,000. No, that's not the pay per hit, or per game. That's the salary for the entire 1994 season.
SPORTS
September 23, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel sluggers Bo Jackson and Chili Davis, each of whom could become free agents, will explore the possibility of playing in Japan next season, according to their agents. "In a weird way, it may be advantageous to be a free agent this year," said Arn Tellem, Jackson's agent. "If you don't have a contract with one club, it gives you the opportunity to go overseas to make a living. We'll consider all options.
SPORTS
March 28, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine 55,000 fans so well behaved that no one belts out obscenities or boos the opposing team, sitting politely, clapping rhythmically in ultra-clean seats where whiskey, vodka and sake are served without fear of a riot. The Japanese fans turning out for Wednesday's historic season opener between the Chicago Cubs and New York Mets in the Tokyo Dome--the first ever outside North America--will be subdued by U.S. standards. But major league baseball hopes the excitement of the U.S.
SPORTS
August 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
Toms River, N.J., Manager Mike Gaynor brought his team to the Little League World Series in 1995 and went 1-2. He says this time around hasn't been much easier. And about that 4-0 record this week, coach? "I think there's a little more parity this time," he insists. He may have a point. The East champions needed 11 innings to beat Jenison, Mich.; defeated Greenville, N.C., by only a couple of runs--twice--and defeated Cypress on a homer late in the game.
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