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NEWS
April 24, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
The desert has come to Japan. Workmen have installed a piece of China's Taklimakan Desert in Nara Park, sealed inside a tent-like structure surrounded by gamboling deer and lush green hills. They imported 30 tons of authentic Taklimakan sand and used heaters and dehumidifiers to recreate the desert's harsh climate, allowing people to experience a landscape so alien to these misty islands that it might as well be from the moon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 28, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Satoru "Tiger Mask" Sayama emerges from his campaign van pulling on his signature pro-wrestling mask in the 90-degree heat and performs a spinning high kick. "Did you see that impressive blow?" a campaign worker screams over a loudspeaker. A few scattered claps shadow a sweating Sayama back to the van, mostly from his own campaign workers. "Thank you. Thank you. Vote for Sayama," the loudspeaker blares as the vehicle edges back into traffic.
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NEWS
November 12, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against a backdrop of violent protest by clandestine radicals opposing Japan's imperial system, Emperor Akihito declared to the world today his accession to the ancient Chrysanthemum Throne. Royalty, heads of state and special envoys from 158 nations assembled under strict rules of protocol at the Imperial Palace in central Tokyo to attend the stiff, 30-minute enthronement rite--the first such ceremony in 62 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The International Jazz Party is an annual opportunity to celebrate the jazz connections that have existed for decades between Japanese and American musicians. And this year's free-to-the-public event was no exception, with three concerts last weekend at the Century Plaza Hotel featuring Frank Capp's "Juggernaut" big band, tenor saxophonist Scott Hamilton, singer Stephanie Haynes, the Bill Berry L.A.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | From Reuters
Despite his illness, Emperor Hirohito viewed the moon through a mirror from his palace sickbed to mark Sunday's traditional moon-viewing festival. "The moon is a little bit chipped," the 87-year-old emperor quipped to his stewards, palace officials said. Usually on festival nights he observes the moon directly from a palace terrace.
NEWS
December 31, 1988 | ANNE Z. COOKE
Don't sweep your house on New Year's Day, an ancient Japanese belief admonishes. Or run the vacuum cleaner and dishwasher, one might also assume. According to time-honored custom, the Japanese gods of good luck will be slipping into your home Sunday morning bringing peace and good fortune for another year. And they're easily frightened away by excessive domestic bustle. So leave the remains of tonight's jollity in peace and quiet and celebrate New Year's Day the traditional Japanese way.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A homemade projectile fired from a car landed near the home of Emperor Akihito's younger brother in Tokyo on Monday, and another such object was found near the imperial garden in Kyoto, police said. No injuries or damage were reported. Police suspect leftist radicals opposed to the monarchy in the attacks, which took place at about the same time in Tokyo and Kyoto.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atsuko Iizuka spent the last two days of December doing what generations of Japanese women before her have done to ring in the New Year: simmering, boiling, baking and broiling 15 separate items for an elaborate feast called osechi . A highlight of the three-day holiday season that begins today, the New Year's feast is a dazzling array of colors and tastes with meaning imbued in each of the main elements. ( Osechi can also be dazzlingly expensive.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buzzing overhead in the Japanese capital these days is a peculiar statement on the times: a police surveillance blimp painted with slogans admonishing citizens on the ground below to be on the lookout for guerrillas. Loyal subjects of the emperor are asked to call a police hot line with tips on suspicious behavior. Not that one would need a telephone to reach authority in central Tokyo--the streets are thick with thousands of police officers, many in full riot gear.
NEWS
July 28, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Satoru "Tiger Mask" Sayama emerges from his campaign van pulling on his signature pro-wrestling mask in the 90-degree heat and performs a spinning high kick. "Did you see that impressive blow?" a campaign worker screams over a loudspeaker. A few scattered claps shadow a sweating Sayama back to the van, mostly from his own campaign workers. "Thank you. Thank you. Vote for Sayama," the loudspeaker blares as the vehicle edges back into traffic.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | KOZO MIZOGUCHI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They once lived in vast colonies throughout Japan. Now, only one Japanese crested ibis remains alive, alone on an island preserve. The highly publicized near-extinction of the snowy-feathered, long-beaked ibis has focused attention on the country's scores of other endangered species--and has prompted some soul-searching about the destruction of nature that has accompanied Japan's economic growth.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atsuko Iizuka spent the last two days of December doing what generations of Japanese women before her have done to ring in the New Year: simmering, boiling, baking and broiling 15 separate items for an elaborate feast called osechi . A highlight of the three-day holiday season that begins today, the New Year's feast is a dazzling array of colors and tastes with meaning imbued in each of the main elements. ( Osechi can also be dazzlingly expensive.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against a backdrop of violent protest by clandestine radicals opposing Japan's imperial system, Emperor Akihito declared to the world today his accession to the ancient Chrysanthemum Throne. Royalty, heads of state and special envoys from 158 nations assembled under strict rules of protocol at the Imperial Palace in central Tokyo to attend the stiff, 30-minute enthronement rite--the first such ceremony in 62 years.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buzzing overhead in the Japanese capital these days is a peculiar statement on the times: a police surveillance blimp painted with slogans admonishing citizens on the ground below to be on the lookout for guerrillas. Loyal subjects of the emperor are asked to call a police hot line with tips on suspicious behavior. Not that one would need a telephone to reach authority in central Tokyo--the streets are thick with thousands of police officers, many in full riot gear.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A homemade projectile fired from a car landed near the home of Emperor Akihito's younger brother in Tokyo on Monday, and another such object was found near the imperial garden in Kyoto, police said. No injuries or damage were reported. Police suspect leftist radicals opposed to the monarchy in the attacks, which took place at about the same time in Tokyo and Kyoto.
NEWS
December 31, 1988 | ANNE Z. COOKE
Don't sweep your house on New Year's Day, an ancient Japanese belief admonishes. Or run the vacuum cleaner and dishwasher, one might also assume. According to time-honored custom, the Japanese gods of good luck will be slipping into your home Sunday morning bringing peace and good fortune for another year. And they're easily frightened away by excessive domestic bustle. So leave the remains of tonight's jollity in peace and quiet and celebrate New Year's Day the traditional Japanese way.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | KOZO MIZOGUCHI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They once lived in vast colonies throughout Japan. Now, only one Japanese crested ibis remains alive, alone on an island preserve. The highly publicized near-extinction of the snowy-feathered, long-beaked ibis has focused attention on the country's scores of other endangered species--and has prompted some soul-searching about the destruction of nature that has accompanied Japan's economic growth.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The International Jazz Party is an annual opportunity to celebrate the jazz connections that have existed for decades between Japanese and American musicians. And this year's free-to-the-public event was no exception, with three concerts last weekend at the Century Plaza Hotel featuring Frank Capp's "Juggernaut" big band, tenor saxophonist Scott Hamilton, singer Stephanie Haynes, the Bill Berry L.A.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | From Reuters
Despite his illness, Emperor Hirohito viewed the moon through a mirror from his palace sickbed to mark Sunday's traditional moon-viewing festival. "The moon is a little bit chipped," the 87-year-old emperor quipped to his stewards, palace officials said. Usually on festival nights he observes the moon directly from a palace terrace.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
The desert has come to Japan. Workmen have installed a piece of China's Taklimakan Desert in Nara Park, sealed inside a tent-like structure surrounded by gamboling deer and lush green hills. They imported 30 tons of authentic Taklimakan sand and used heaters and dehumidifiers to recreate the desert's harsh climate, allowing people to experience a landscape so alien to these misty islands that it might as well be from the moon.
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