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NEWS
July 7, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Management at Kiyoshi Iida's workplace has urged workers to make the most of the office's new computer network, including using their personal computers to communicate with each other. There are a few problems, however. "My boss has been saying that, with the introduction of a local area network in the office, we should all use the system," Iida said. "But I tried to send a message to him through the electronic mail, and I found out he was not connected."
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BUSINESS
July 19, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a deal that could spur Internet use and provide more opportunities for U.S. players in Japan's $130-billion telecommunications market, Tokyo agreed early today to lower the fees that competitors must pay to connect to Japanese homes and offices. The 20% fee reduction over two years was less than Washington wanted but more than Tokyo hoped to relinquish. As such, both sides appeared to blink.
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NEWS
March 13, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five days before a deadline for U.S. retaliation, Japan and the United States ended a bitter dispute over access to Japan's cellular telephone market Saturday, raising prospects for a resumption of broader talks that could ease trade tensions. The agreement aims to allow Motorola Inc. to compete on an equal basis with Japanese companies in providing cellular phone service in the heavily populated region stretching from Tokyo to Nagoya.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Chinese satellite intended for use by many well-known broadcasters has been launched in defiance of international rules into an orbit where it will disrupt Japanese telecommunications, government officials here have charged.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Telecommunications Deregulation Planned: The government will propose eliminating restrictions on new entrants into the telecommunications industry as part of a package of economic deregulation measures, according to the Nihon Keizai newspaper, Japan's leading financial daily. The package will also propose that some areas zoned for agricultural use be turned into residential districts.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan forged an agreement Wednesday to open the Japanese market to further inroads by U.S. telecommunications firms. The detailed pact, based on a March 30 accord that helped Japan avoid the threat of U.S. trade sanctions, is designed to allow foreign manufacturers to provide sophisticated international telecommunications services and equipment in the largely closed Japanese market. Negotiators faced an Aug. 1 deadline for reaching the final agreement.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Two years ago, when Japan turned giant Nippon Telegraph & Telephone over to private ownership and deregulated the telecommunications industry, tension between Japan and the United States reached fever pitch. After negotiations that involved intervention by President Reagan and Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone, the trouble was resolved.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
A crowd gathers along the old wooden veranda of Ryoanji on a recent Sunday to gaze upon the enigmatic rock garden that has made this temple one of the most cherished sites in Zen Buddhism. Suddenly, the scene is pierced by a woman's voice from an unseen loudspeaker. "Please look at the garden in silence," she instructs the visitors. The recording then proceeds to chat in Japanese about all aspects of the garden.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Management at Kiyoshi Iida's workplace has urged workers to make the most of the office's new computer network, including using their personal computers to communicate with each other. There are a few problems, however. "My boss has been saying that, with the introduction of a local area network in the office, we should all use the system," Iida said. "But I tried to send a message to him through the electronic mail, and I found out he was not connected."
BUSINESS
May 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Telecommunications Deregulation Planned: The government will propose eliminating restrictions on new entrants into the telecommunications industry as part of a package of economic deregulation measures, according to the Nihon Keizai newspaper, Japan's leading financial daily. The package will also propose that some areas zoned for agricultural use be turned into residential districts.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five days before a deadline for U.S. retaliation, Japan and the United States ended a bitter dispute over access to Japan's cellular telephone market Saturday, raising prospects for a resumption of broader talks that could ease trade tensions. The agreement aims to allow Motorola Inc. to compete on an equal basis with Japanese companies in providing cellular phone service in the heavily populated region stretching from Tokyo to Nagoya.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tokyo-based electronics giant Toshiba Corp. decided in 1984 to bolster its telecommunications business, company officials decided that it would be foolhardy to challenge Fujitsu Ltd. and NEC Corp., which dominated the Japanese market. But the U.S. market, newly opened to competition after the court-ordered breakup of American Telephone & Telegraph, offered Toshiba another path into telecommunications.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan forged an agreement Wednesday to open the Japanese market to further inroads by U.S. telecommunications firms. The detailed pact, based on a March 30 accord that helped Japan avoid the threat of U.S. trade sanctions, is designed to allow foreign manufacturers to provide sophisticated international telecommunications services and equipment in the largely closed Japanese market. Negotiators faced an Aug. 1 deadline for reaching the final agreement.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a deal that could spur Internet use and provide more opportunities for U.S. players in Japan's $130-billion telecommunications market, Tokyo agreed early today to lower the fees that competitors must pay to connect to Japanese homes and offices. The 20% fee reduction over two years was less than Washington wanted but more than Tokyo hoped to relinquish. As such, both sides appeared to blink.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Chinese satellite intended for use by many well-known broadcasters has been launched in defiance of international rules into an orbit where it will disrupt Japanese telecommunications, government officials here have charged.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Rush hour comes every night--the electronic rush hour, that is. Offices are dark and locked up in Los Angeles and other U.S. cities, but from across the Pacific the high-tech traffic streams in: fax and telex messages sent by Japanese companies to their American subsidiaries. "Most of the traffic from Tokyo to Los Angeles comes at about midnight our time," said Fumio Katsumata, a Los Angeles administrator with Marubeni America, a trading company that has more than 140 offices worldwide.
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