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NEWS
May 2, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One-third of Japanese voters, an 11% increase, favor revision of the nation's "peace constitution," a Yomiuri newspaper poll disclosed today. A bare majority--51%--remain opposed to revision, down six points from the last such poll in 1986.
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OPINION
January 11, 2013 | By Bruce Ackerman and Tokujin Matsudaira
Japan's new prime minister, Shinzo Abe, has announced plans to revise his country's famous pacifist constitutional provision, Article 9, which renounces "war as a sovereign right of the nation. " On the surface, Abe's proposal may seem merely symbolic, suggesting that he simply wants to add an explicit recognition of the country's right to military self- defense. Since Japan has long maintained "self-defense" forces, the predictable expressions of concern in foreign capitals may seem overblown.
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NEWS
February 5, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last four decades, to advocate revising Japan's so-called "peace constitution" was a taboo subject for most Japanese. The silence was steadfastly observed by mainstream politicians and journalists and was reinforced by public fears that any revision could lead to Japan once again becoming a military giant. Now, suddenly, the taboo is gone. Proponents of change have sprung up within both the ruling Liberal Democratic Party and the opposition.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's largest newspaper today broke a 48-year taboo by urging a sweeping revision of the nation's postwar constitution that would formally ban Japan from possessing nuclear weapons. Not once since the constitution was promulgated in 1946 during the U.S. occupation has any general newspaper advocated specific proposals for constitutional revision.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After nearly a month of procrastination, Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Wednesday announced a carefully limited package of financial and other non-military assistance for the international effort in response to Iraqi moves in the Persian Gulf region. Kaifu and his government rebuffed repeated U.S. requests for greater Japanese participation in the current Mideast operations, such as a naval presence, minesweepers, military airlifts or the dispatch of noncombatant military personnel.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | JIM MANN and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Japanese government has told the Bush Administration it plans to unveil a series of proposals next week to help the United States bear the huge costs of the American military operations in the Persian Gulf, sources said Thursday. The package will be aimed at heading off growing criticism in this country that Japan--and other U.S. allies--are benefiting from the massive U.S. troop deployment in the Mideast but not paying enough to offset the costs to the American economy.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a provocative call to expand the nation's military role, a special panel of the ruling party has proposed reinterpreting Japan's strict no-war constitution to allow the use of military forces overseas for U.N. peacekeeping activities. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and other government leaders appeared to reject the idea Friday, saying there should be no change in constitutional interpretation.
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | Associated Press
Japan's new emperor said today he will help safeguard the democratic constitution, and leftist politicians urged vigilance against any government effort to use the monarchy for "reactionary" ends. One Communist and five Socialist legislators boycotted the ceremony at which Emperor Akihito pledged himself to the constitution imposed by the United States after World War II, but two Socialists did attend.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's largest newspaper today broke a 48-year taboo by urging a sweeping revision of the nation's postwar constitution that would formally ban Japan from possessing nuclear weapons. Not once since the constitution was promulgated in 1946 during the U.S. occupation has any general newspaper advocated specific proposals for constitutional revision.
OPINION
January 11, 2013 | By Bruce Ackerman and Tokujin Matsudaira
Japan's new prime minister, Shinzo Abe, has announced plans to revise his country's famous pacifist constitutional provision, Article 9, which renounces "war as a sovereign right of the nation. " On the surface, Abe's proposal may seem merely symbolic, suggesting that he simply wants to add an explicit recognition of the country's right to military self- defense. Since Japan has long maintained "self-defense" forces, the predictable expressions of concern in foreign capitals may seem overblown.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last four decades, to advocate revising Japan's so-called "peace constitution" was a taboo subject for most Japanese. The silence was steadfastly observed by mainstream politicians and journalists and was reinforced by public fears that any revision could lead to Japan once again becoming a military giant. Now, suddenly, the taboo is gone. Proponents of change have sprung up within both the ruling Liberal Democratic Party and the opposition.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a provocative call to expand the nation's military role, a special panel of the ruling party has proposed reinterpreting Japan's strict no-war constitution to allow the use of military forces overseas for U.N. peacekeeping activities. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and other government leaders appeared to reject the idea Friday, saying there should be no change in constitutional interpretation.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One-third of Japanese voters, an 11% increase, favor revision of the nation's "peace constitution," a Yomiuri newspaper poll disclosed today. A bare majority--51%--remain opposed to revision, down six points from the last such poll in 1986.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After nearly a month of procrastination, Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Wednesday announced a carefully limited package of financial and other non-military assistance for the international effort in response to Iraqi moves in the Persian Gulf region. Kaifu and his government rebuffed repeated U.S. requests for greater Japanese participation in the current Mideast operations, such as a naval presence, minesweepers, military airlifts or the dispatch of noncombatant military personnel.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | JIM MANN and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Japanese government has told the Bush Administration it plans to unveil a series of proposals next week to help the United States bear the huge costs of the American military operations in the Persian Gulf, sources said Thursday. The package will be aimed at heading off growing criticism in this country that Japan--and other U.S. allies--are benefiting from the massive U.S. troop deployment in the Mideast but not paying enough to offset the costs to the American economy.
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | Associated Press
Japan's new emperor said today he will help safeguard the democratic constitution, and leftist politicians urged vigilance against any government effort to use the monarchy for "reactionary" ends. One Communist and five Socialist legislators boycotted the ceremony at which Emperor Akihito pledged himself to the constitution imposed by the United States after World War II, but two Socialists did attend.
OPINION
September 2, 1990 | David J. Scheffer, David J. Scheffer, an international lawyer, is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
The winds of war are swirling across the Arabian sands. If Iraq stands firm, endures the U.N. economic sanctions and takes no action to provoke a massive military response from U.S. or multinational forces, the enforcement of international law either will have to be ventured or forsaken. Since upholding international law closely parallels U.S. objectives in the Middle East, this will become the most critical decision ever to confront the U.N. Security Council in its 45-year history.
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