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BUSINESS
May 22, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
A year ago, construction projects in Japan were virtually closed to American contractors, engineers and architects, although Japanese firms were rapidly increasing their participation in U.S. projects. Then, under pressure from the U.S. government, the Japanese agreed last year to open the door to its construction market slightly. Since then, Americans have made measurable progress, primarily through joint ventures with Japanese firms. Still, some American industry officials complain that the pace is too slow.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2002 | Associated Press
Japan's hobbled economy sank deeper into recession, shrinking 1.2% during the three months ending in December, the third consecutive quarter of contraction, the government said. Last quarter, which ended in September, Japan slid into its third recession in a decade--sinking 0.5% or an annual rate of 2.1%. Recession is generally defined as two consecutive quarters of contraction. The contraction for the latest quarter translates to an annual 4.5% contraction.
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NEWS
March 30, 1988 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
In an attempt to defuse an increasingly volatile trade issue, U.S. and Japanese officials Tuesday announced a plan that would allow American builders to bid for billions of dollars of construction work in Japan, including airports, roads, bridges and buildings. The accord came after two years of on-and-off negotiations, prompted by growing White House protests that Japan was unfairly blocking U.S.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Motorola Inc. was awarded a contract that analysts value at $1.5 billion or more to supply cellular phone equipment to two companies that are building wireless networks in Japan. DDI Corp., Japan's second-largest phone company, and Nippon Idou Tsushin, a Toyota Motor Corp. affiliate, said they will combine their networks to form a nationwide cellular system early next year.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
After more than 30 years of slugging away on the fringes of Japan's construction market, PAE International still had trouble hiring local subcontractors, so strong was the taboo against collaborating with foreigners. When a PAE executive complained about the dilemma in an interview televised here last year, however, he was quickly surprised by telephone calls from several sympathetic Japanese subcontractors. It seemed that a major shift in attitude was afoot. They were actually asking for work.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan May File Charges in Bid-Rigging Cases: Japan's anti-monopoly watchdog is poised to file rare criminal charges against nine electronics firms and their executives, alleging bid-rigging going back as far as January, Japanese media said. The Fair Trade Commission has been investigating suspicions that the firms, which include industry leaders, repeatedly rigged bids and arranged in advance the winners of contracts for water supply and sewage systems for regional governments.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Government to Revise Computer Purchase Standards: Foreign computer makers locked out of the Japanese government's computer procurement program may stand a better chance after officials revise purchase standards, according to a Japanese financial newspaper. The government will replace its current price-only standard with a more detailed list of assessment factors in selecting bids from computer manufacturers, the Nihon Keizai Shimbun said.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Audit Faults Bidding System: Results of a Japanese government audit found fault with its bidding system in public works, lending credence to U.S. arguments that Japan's construction market is closed to foreign competition. The report by the government's Management and Coordination Agency said 20 out of 35 government ministries and public corporations had not adopted a fair open-bidding system.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing fresh evidence of how some Japanese markets are kept closed, Japan's Fair Trade Commission on Monday accused nine electrical machinery makers of illegal bid rigging. Among the firms accused of anti-competitive practices are some of Japan's most famous electronics firms, including Hitachi Ltd., Toshiba Corp. and Mitsubishi Electric Corp.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan May File Charges in Bid-Rigging Cases: Japan's anti-monopoly watchdog is poised to file rare criminal charges against nine electronics firms and their executives, alleging bid-rigging going back as far as January, Japanese media said. The Fair Trade Commission has been investigating suspicions that the firms, which include industry leaders, repeatedly rigged bids and arranged in advance the winners of contracts for water supply and sewage systems for regional governments.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to domestic construction scandals and the threat of U.S. trade sanctions, Japan on Tuesday approved a plan to open major public works projects to foreign contractors. But the practical impact of the program was unclear because some key details were not spelled out, and U.S. officials reserved comment until they could study it further.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Audit Faults Bidding System: Results of a Japanese government audit found fault with its bidding system in public works, lending credence to U.S. arguments that Japan's construction market is closed to foreign competition. The report by the government's Management and Coordination Agency said 20 out of 35 government ministries and public corporations had not adopted a fair open-bidding system.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S.-Based Firm in Architectural Venture: RTKL Associates Inc. said it was selected in a joint venture with two Japanese architectural firms to design for the government a $500-million, 2.7 million-square-foot office complex in a Tokyo suburb. The company, with offices in Los Angeles, said the contract results from intensive efforts by the U.S. government to open the Japanese construction market to U.S. participation.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
Japan said Tuesday that it will retaliate if the United States makes good on a threat to bar Japanese companies from its government-funded construction projects. The United States said last week that it intended to bar the Japanese companies because talks had produced no agreement on a wider opening of Japan's construction market.
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