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NEWS
April 17, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge Thursday awarded a woman $12,400 in a ruling that for the first time recognized verbal sexual harassment as illegal in the Japanese workplace. "Although the term sexual harassment was not used, the judge recognized that sexual discrimination is illegal," said Ikuko Tsujimoto, lawyer for the plaintiff. The case was widely called the first sexual harassment suit in Japan, a country where women traditionally have remained silent about unwelcome physical actions and verbal abuse from men.
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BUSINESS
September 1, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
A Tokyo court has sided with Samsung in its patent battle with Apple, ruling the South Korean electronics company did not infringe one of its rival's patents. It's the latest development in the complex global fight between the two companies over mobile device technology. Court battles on four continents have created a patchwork of rulings and product bans. Last week, for instance, a nine-member federal jury in San Jose found in Apple's favor, awarding the company $1.05 billion in damages.
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NEWS
June 2, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
In a major setback for advocates of stronger separation of religion and state in Japan, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday against a Christian woman who sued the government for violating her rights by enshrining her husband in a Shinto ceremony after he died on military duty. The high court overturned two lower-court rulings that the "personal religious rights" of the widow, Yasuko Nakaya, 54, had been violated by Self-Defense Forces officials who helped in the enshrinement over her objections.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2004 | From Reuters
Japan's Supreme Court ruled that troubled bank UFJ Holdings Inc. can pull out of a deal to sell its trust business to a smaller rival, clearing the way for a full takeover of UFJ by larger rival Mitsubishi Tokyo Financial Group Inc. The court rejected an appeal by Sumitomo Trust & Banking Co., which had agreed in May to buy the trust unit from UFJ.
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | From the Washington Post
A Japanese court has ruled in favor of a 33-year-old woman who divorced her husband after he demanded that every day she cook him breakfast, press his pants and clean the house. The woman worked full time, but the husband said it was the wife's job to do all the housework. The husband, a 35-year-old public servant, filed a lawsuit demanding that his wife pay him about $38,000 in damages because she did not live up to her end of the marriage arrangement.
NEWS
August 18, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japan Federation of Bar Assns., which has criticized police and prosecutors for abusing the rights of Aum Supreme Truth members accused of a host of heinous crimes, is now beginning to worry about its own members, who will have to defend the cultists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1988
In a case that created a sensation in Japan, prosecutors in Tokyo on Thursday indicted Kazuyoshi Miura and Yoshikuni Okubo on charges of murdering Miura's wife in Los Angeles seven years ago to collect $700,000 on three insurance policies. The indictment follows the arrest of Miura, 41, and Okubo, 36, on Oct. 21. Miura was already in custody, serving a six-year sentence for an earlier, unsuccessful plot against his wife. Miura's wife, Kazumi, then 28, was shot in the head with a .
NEWS
December 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
In a major victory for Japan's working women, a court Friday upheld a lower court ruling that 12 women had been sexually discriminated against in promotions and pay, ordering their company to pay $1.6 million in damages. The Tokyo High Court handed down the ruling in a lawsuit initially filed in 1987 against Tokyo-based Shiba Credit Assn. The legal battle has been closely watched in male-dominated Japan as setting a precedent for decisions on sexual discrimination in the workplace.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a defeat for activists seeking to oust the U.S. military from Okinawa, Japan's Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the island's governor must cooperate with the central government in forcing hostile landowners to renew leases on land occupied by U.S. bases. The court took less than one minute to announce its verdict, then adjourned without explaining its reasoning, infuriating the Okinawans. About 20 protesters stood up in the courtroom and shouted at the backs of the departing justices.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the mountains of Kyushu, a small group of elderly villagers huddled around a kerosene stove last month to talk about their long battle with arsenic, bureaucracy and the courts--in their view, three equally virulent strains of poison. Their experiences tell a sorry tale about the state of justice in Japan today. Forty-one villagers filed suit against Sumitomo Metal Mining Co.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a lengthy search that highlighted weaknesses in the Japanese criminal justice system, police on Friday announced the discovery of dismembered body parts believed to be those of a 22-year-old Briton missing since July. The case of Lucie Blackman, which was front-page news here, focused attention on Japan's heavy reliance on confessions to solve crimes.
NEWS
December 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
In a major victory for Japan's working women, a court Friday upheld a lower court ruling that 12 women had been sexually discriminated against in promotions and pay, ordering their company to pay $1.6 million in damages. The Tokyo High Court handed down the ruling in a lawsuit initially filed in 1987 against Tokyo-based Shiba Credit Assn. The legal battle has been closely watched in male-dominated Japan as setting a precedent for decisions on sexual discrimination in the workplace.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | MARI YAMAGUCHI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Keawprapa Supaporn couldn't understand her court-appointed interpreter's broken Thai and had to guess at what the judge was saying. So she asked the court to provide a new interpreter. Her request was denied. She was convicted of murdering her pimp and sentenced to eight years in prison. Case closed. After drawing a flood of foreigners during its boom years, Japan is facing a soaring caseload of crimes committed by them.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | MARI YAMAGUCHI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Etsuko Yamada has spent almost half of her life on trial for murder. Prosecutors first hauled her into court in 1978 for allegedly drowning a mentally handicapped child in a septic tank at the school where Yamada was a teacher. She was found innocent in 1985. But the prosecution exercised its right under Japanese law to appeal the verdict. She was acquitted again in late March. Again, prosecutors are appealing.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic decision ending an ideologically charged 32-year legal battle, the Japanese Supreme Court on Friday ruled that it was illegal for the government to censor from textbooks unsavory facts about Japan's wartime past.
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | From the Washington Post
A Japanese court has ruled in favor of a 33-year-old woman who divorced her husband after he demanded that every day she cook him breakfast, press his pants and clean the house. The woman worked full time, but the husband said it was the wife's job to do all the housework. The husband, a 35-year-old public servant, filed a lawsuit demanding that his wife pay him about $38,000 in damages because she did not live up to her end of the marriage arrangement.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a lengthy search that highlighted weaknesses in the Japanese criminal justice system, police on Friday announced the discovery of dismembered body parts believed to be those of a 22-year-old Briton missing since July. The case of Lucie Blackman, which was front-page news here, focused attention on Japan's heavy reliance on confessions to solve crimes.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 19-year legal struggle over the biggest scandal to strike post-World War II Japan ended Wednesday when the Supreme Court upheld guilty verdicts against the last two of 16 defendants in the Lockheed bribery case. The ruling also confirmed the guilt of the late Prime Minister Kakuei Tanaka for accepting a $1.8-million Lockheed bribe and brought to 11 the number of Lockheed defendants whose convictions were made final.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a defeat for activists seeking to oust the U.S. military from Okinawa, Japan's Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the island's governor must cooperate with the central government in forcing hostile landowners to renew leases on land occupied by U.S. bases. The court took less than one minute to announce its verdict, then adjourned without explaining its reasoning, infuriating the Okinawans. About 20 protesters stood up in the courtroom and shouted at the backs of the departing justices.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A court ruled that Okinawa's governor must renew land leases for U.S. bases on the island. The Fukuoka High Court branch in Naha, Okinawa's capital, ordered Gov. Masahide Ota to sign papers renewing U.S. leases in cases where Okinawan landowners refused to sign the leases themselves. If Ota still refuses to sign despite the ruling, Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto is authorized to sign in his place.
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