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NEWS
December 17, 1987
The Consulate General of Japan in Los Angeles is planning its second cultural exchange program to intensify English language instruction in Japan, the 1988 JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching Program). JET enrolls instructors from the United States and other English-speaking countries to teach English in Japan among local governments, schools and small companies for one year. The program is being expanded from 800 to 1,300 instructors. Applications for the 1988 program, which begins on Aug.
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WORLD
September 22, 2011 | By Tom Miyagawa Coulton and John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
The unmarked envelope floated into the living room of the home in northeastern Japan, riding the wave of tsunami floodwaters. Inside, the astounded resident found $40,000 in yen notes. More money has been found in wallets, paper bags, and other containers swept away from their owners and scattered across a landscape ripped apart by the March 11 earthquake. One woman found $26,000 in a purse she had spotted atop a pile of debris. One police locksmith opened the heavy door of a recovered safe to find $1.3 million in yen notes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1985 | JOSEPH KRAFT, Joseph Kraft is a Los Angeles Times columnist in Washington.
Hiroshima and the end of World War II have a bearing on the current trade dispute between this country and Japan. But not in the simple sense that the Japanese, defeated in war, then took commercial revenge. On the contrary, a deep cultural disconnection underlies both military and trade confrontations. Now, as in the past, conflicts far more deadly than intended could develop unless each country takes special care not to misread the other. Japan is a consensus society.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2010 | Yuriko Nagano
Aya Yokura spends her days hunched over white sheets of paper, drawing intricately costumed characters whose creation can be painstaking and time-consuming. For the last two years, she has spent up to 100 hours a week at her workstation — a low-paying, labor-intensive job that helps bring Japan's famous style of animated cartoons to life. Although the 26-year-old earns only about $10,000 a year and lives with her mom to make ends meet, she and a few thousand Japanese artists like her fill a crucial role in the technical process of creating this visual entertainment form, known as anime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | KEVIN F. SHERRY
The Ventura County Japanese-American Citizens' League will host its 10th annual Japanese Cultural Festival on Sunday. The event will feature traditional Japanese music, dancing and martial arts, as well as storytelling and crafts for kids. Visitors will see demonstrations of flower arranging, a tea ceremony, brush painting, koi and bonsai. The festival runs from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday at the Camarillo Community Center, 1605 E. Burnley St.
MAGAZINE
October 26, 2003 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
When Stuart Levy started Tokyopop Inc. in 1997, he had a tough time convincing venture capitalists that Japanese comic books could be popular in America. But "comic books" doesn't adequately describe the mass appeal of manga, full-length black-and-white graphic novels spanning every genre from hard-boiled action-adventure sagas to sci-fi and fantasy. Today L.A.-based Tokyopop has a projected revenue of $35 million for 2003 and brings to the U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 1 p.m. Sunday, there wasn't enough breeze to budge the balloon arches that festooned the plaza at the Japan American Culture Center in downtown Los Angeles. It was hot outdoors, verging on beastly. And Jack Shakely, director of the California Community Foundation, was worried. The free, multicultural festival scheduled from 1 to 5 p.m.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | T. R. REID, THE WASHINGTON POST
With characteristic efficiency and ingenuity, the Japanese have brought the full force of modern technology to bear on a timeless human endeavor: the secret afternoon tryst. All over the country, a special breed of hotels exists just for couples who want a quick fling in complete confidentiality.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | DAVID LAZARUS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Frances Lotochinski has been in Japan only three weeks, is having a hard time getting around and, for the life of her, she just can't make chopsticks work. "How do they come together?" asked Lotochinski, a Tennessean married to an American Telephone and Telegraph Co. executive, as her fingers contort around the unfamiliar utensils. Kazuko Iwatsuki eases Lotochinski's hand into the correct position and assures her that learning new skills, while not always easy, can be done.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2001 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The art of every civilization is a mixture of tradition, observation and imagination. Maybe that's why a special exhibition at the Pacific Asia Museum is, initially, a little puzzling. Titled "The Nature of the Beast," about 50 drawings, scrolls and screens set out to show us how traditional Japanese art depicts animals. Earlier Japanese artists copied Chinese art. They were less interested in what animals really looked like than what they symbolized.
NEWS
February 5, 2006 | Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press Writer
Masa sits on the couch in his apartment with his arm around Konoha's shoulders, gently brushing her hair away from her bright blue eyes. Iris stands behind them, decked out in a frilly dress. Masa speaks warmly to Konoha and Iris, greeting them brightly each morning and when he returns from work, but they never answer. His companions are life-sized dolls. Konoha is his favorite.
MAGAZINE
October 26, 2003 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
When Stuart Levy started Tokyopop Inc. in 1997, he had a tough time convincing venture capitalists that Japanese comic books could be popular in America. But "comic books" doesn't adequately describe the mass appeal of manga, full-length black-and-white graphic novels spanning every genre from hard-boiled action-adventure sagas to sci-fi and fantasy. Today L.A.-based Tokyopop has a projected revenue of $35 million for 2003 and brings to the U.S.
WORLD
August 21, 2002 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They cost as much as $20,000, hurt like you wouldn't believe and virtually guarantee pariah status in proper Japanese society. So why in the world would anyone seek such a thing? For those with full-body tattoos, known as horimono, it's about inner satisfaction, a link with centuries-old tradition and the chance to show you're a "real man"--or woman.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newspapers in Japan have written extensive articles about the stores Nissan Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn prefers when he goes suit shopping. Hundreds of photographers at the recent Tokyo Motor Show jammed to the front of the stage when Ghosn introduced the new Nissan Z--not to take pictures of the car but to grab some candid shots of the heavy-browed executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2001 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The art of every civilization is a mixture of tradition, observation and imagination. Maybe that's why a special exhibition at the Pacific Asia Museum is, initially, a little puzzling. Titled "The Nature of the Beast," about 50 drawings, scrolls and screens set out to show us how traditional Japanese art depicts animals. Earlier Japanese artists copied Chinese art. They were less interested in what animals really looked like than what they symbolized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | KEVIN F. SHERRY
The Ventura County Japanese-American Citizens' League will host its 10th annual Japanese Cultural Festival on Sunday. The event will feature traditional Japanese music, dancing and martial arts, as well as storytelling and crafts for kids. Visitors will see demonstrations of flower arranging, a tea ceremony, brush painting, koi and bonsai. The festival runs from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday at the Camarillo Community Center, 1605 E. Burnley St.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japanese government-financed "cultural exchange" fund designed to help repair the nation's emotionally frayed relations with the United States is about to be launched. But it has already been criticized by Americans who are concerned that it will become yet another effort by Japan to win commercial success in the U.S. market by buying influence.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Rice is the Japanese culture that has lasted for several thousand years. It is the Japanese people themselves," Tomio Yamamoto, Japan's new agriculture minister, declared as he took over his job. Rice, however, is no longer the culture it once was. Indeed, Japanese are eating less of it every year. Farmers themselves are cutting consumption even faster than city dwellers. Not even 15 years of campaigns to promote rice consumption have halted the decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, Stanley Meisler is a Times staff writer
In 1615, Tokugawa Ieyasu, the Japanese shogun, or military feudal overlord, defeated his remaining rivals to emerge as unchallenged ruler of Japan, bringing on 2 1/2 centuries of unprecedented peace and prosperity under army rule. The calm and the riches during the reign of 15 successive Tokugawa shoguns fostered an incredible outburst of art--on screens and scrolls and kimonos and textiles and porcelain and lacquer and helmets and woodblocks--in an era that is known as the Edo period in Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1995 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More and more, agree the ladies of the San Fernando Valley Japanese American Community Center in Sylmar, it's up to the second generation--the Nisei--to keep the Japanese traditions of New Year's celebrations alive. These women, who frequent the weekly senior lunch and activities day, say their relatives in Japan buy prepackaged food, and their children and grandchildren would rather eat Chinese chicken salad and watch football.
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