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NEWS
January 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Japan on Saturday announced a defense buildup plan that formally scraps a decade-old ceiling limiting defense spending to 1% of the country's gross national product. The announcement, which followed a special Cabinet session, said defense expenditures for the five-year period ending March 31, 1991, would be about $120 billion. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone told reporters the defense expenditures for each fiscal year are expected to average about 1.02% of gross national product.
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WORLD
April 9, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Japan readied its missile defense systems Tuesday against a possible North Korean weapons test, saying it would shoot down any missiles or debris if Japanese territory was threatened. Patriot anti-missile batteries were deployed on the grounds of the Defense Ministry in Tokyo and at military installations in and around the capital, according to Japanese news reports. The PAC-3 batteries will also be based on the island of Okinawa, which hosts the bulk of U.S. troops in Japan, sooner than planned in response to North Korea's threats, the Asahi Shimbun reported . Deploying the anti-missile system in Tokyo is “part of our moves to establish a system to protect the lives of our citizens and ensure their safety,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said at a news conference, according to Jiji Press . Suga earlier said that the missiles will be used solely to protect Japan, according to the Japan Times . Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has pushed for Japan to reinterpret its constitution, which bans waging war, to allow Japan to intercept missiles fired at United States targets.
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NEWS
December 25, 1989 | From Reuters
Japan's defense budget is set to slip next year below the key level of 1% of gross national product, though actual military spending will rise, Finance Ministry officials said Sunday. Strong growth of the Japanese economy means a proposed 5.5% increase in 1990-91 defense spending, to $29 billion, will still put it beneath 1% of GNP for the first time in four years.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
One of the great cliches commonly accepted in this country is that China is the rising power in Asia. You can hear this fashionable belief everywhere, whether in academic seminars, political debates or working-class bars. Yet within the depths of the Pentagon and the U.S. intelligence community, one hears a contrary argument, It goes like this: There are two rising powers in Asia. Two? You guessed it. China and Japan. Japan's attitude toward its military is quietly transforming.
NEWS
May 31, 1987
Yuko Kurihara, director general of the Japan Defense Agency, said he has assured Chinese officials that there is "no possibility" of Japan again becoming a military threat in Asia, despite efforts to strengthen Japan's defense capabilities, the New China News Agency reported. Kurihara spoke at a news conference in Beijing after two days of talks with top Chinese officials, including Defense Minister Zhang Aiping.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | From Reuters
Japan's Defense Agency, citing a continued threat from the Soviet Union, asked Friday for an increase in spending next year to cover new ships, tanks and aircraft. Agency officials said they also need a 6.35% increase in the annual budget starting next April 1 to shoulder a bigger share of the cost of keeping U.S. troops in the country. The budget request is for $29 billion, up $1.7 billion over the current year's budget.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | United Press International
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said Friday he was pleased at increases in Japan's new defense budget for the support of U.S. forces stationed there. In a statement issued at the Pentagon while he is vacationing in Wyoming, Cheney said he welcomed the announcement of Japan's 1990 draft budget and was encouraged at the decision to fund the final year of the current Japanese defense plan.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1988 | United Press International
Japan and the United States signed an agreement to begin a multibillion-dollar joint venture to develop a state-of-the-art jet fighter for Japan's air defense. The agreement, signed Tuesday, calls for St. Louis-based General Dynamics Corp. and three Japanese companies--Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. and Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.--to jointly develop the new fighter based on the General Dynamics F-16.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan on Tuesday revised its national defense policy for the first time in nearly two decades, calling for a high-tech, streamlined military force and reaffirming the security alliance with the United States. The new policy, approved by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama and other Cabinet members of the Security Council of Japan after extensive political wrangling, also spells out new duties for the force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1999
When Japan's Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi lands in Los Angeles today--a bow to strong and growing economic ties with California--he will be carrying onward to Washington a set of new laws designed to strengthen the security alliance between the two countries. The defense guidelines established by Tokyo represent a small but potentially significant change in Japan's attitude toward its role in the defense of its neighborhood. Few contentious issues are expected to be addressed in the visit.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Don't look now but Japan is developing a more independent military capability just in case its alliance with the United States should someday fall apart. That is the blunt conclusion drawn by the U.S. intelligence community in two reports over the last three months. These soberly written studies say that Japan is now "hedging its bets" by strengthening its security ties to the United States while preparing for a time when Japan may stand on its own.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | JIM MANN
No one paid much attention to Japanese Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi's visit here this week-except, undoubtedly, the Chinese and the Russians. Obuchi's trip demonstrated to them how the United States is attempting to redesign its old Cold War alliances for the future-not just in Europe, where NATO is fighting a new kind of war, but also in Asia, where America and Japan are quietly establishing new sorts of military links.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1999
When Japan's Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi lands in Los Angeles today--a bow to strong and growing economic ties with California--he will be carrying onward to Washington a set of new laws designed to strengthen the security alliance between the two countries. The defense guidelines established by Tokyo represent a small but potentially significant change in Japan's attitude toward its role in the defense of its neighborhood. Few contentious issues are expected to be addressed in the visit.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's lower house of parliament approved long-awaited legislation today that spells out how this nation will assist U.S military forces in case conflict breaks out in its neighborhood. The guidelines for U.S.-Japan defense cooperation do not require Japan to change its "no war" constitution or to fight unless directly attacked.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When North Korea launched a crude satellite-bearing rocket in August, it was not just a remarkable technological achievement by one of the world's poorest and most isolated nations. The test-firing of the multistage ballistic missile, which disintegrated over the north Pacific, created a political and military fallout that stretched from Tokyo to Washington to Beijing.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid rising political tensions on the Korean peninsula, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen urged Japanese leaders Thursday to get parliament moving on guidelines that would enable Japan to back up the United States in military conflicts in the Asia-Pacific region. But long-stalled action on the guidelines--which were signed by the two countries in September 1997 but still require approval by parliament--is no slam-dunk.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | JIM MANN
Nothing's going to change. Nothing's going to change. Honest. Everything's fine. Go back to sleep. That was going to be the message of next week's state visit by Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto to Washington. President Clinton was going to give Ryu a big dinner, tell him he's more handsome than Chinese President Jiang Zemin and proclaim America's alliance with Japan to be as smooth-running and repair-free as a Toyota Camry. Whoops.
OPINION
September 28, 1997 | Robert A. Manning, Robert A. Manning, a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute, was a State Department policy advisor from 1989-93
At first glance, it seemed a modest step when the United States and Japan unveiled new guidelines last week upgrading their security alliance. After all, the accord simply details the ways Japan would cooperate with the United States in peacetime or wartime in "areas surrounding Japan." Indeed, most Americans would probably be shocked to learn that before this accord, it was uncertain if wounded American soldiers could be treated at Japanese hospitals or if U.S.
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